Writers with Entries

Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles from the Beginnings to the Present is an on-line cultural history generated from the lives and works of women writers. The 1305 writers listed below—as British women, men, and other women—have their own entries in Orlando. Women whose nationality shifted are listed twice. More than 31,000 people and 7,500 organizations are mentioned or discussed somewhere in the textbase (in others’ entries and in the thousands of free-standing events), and dozens of these are writers without dedicated entries. For more information on Orlando visit http://www.cambridge.org/online/orlandoonline

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British Women Writers

 


Other Women Writers

 


Male Writers

 


Summary of Content
1,305 entries (1,025 British women writers, 175 male writers, 166 other women writers—listed twice if their nationality shifted); 13,607 free-standing chronology entries; 26,278 bibliographical listings; 2,499,869 tags; 8,075,393 words (exclusive of tags).

Writers with Entries (Initial Release)

Writers with Entries (January 2007 Update)

Writers with Entries (July 2007 Update)

Writers with Entries (January 2008 Update)

Writers with Entries (July 2008 Update)

Writers with Entries (January 2009 Update)

Writers with Entries (July 2009 Update)

Writers with Entries (January 2010 Update)

Writers with Entries (July 2010 Update)

Writers with Entries (January 2011 Update)

Writers with Entries (July 2011 Update)

Writers with Entries (January 2012 Update)

Writers with Entries (July 2012 Update)

Writers with Entries (January 2013 Update)

Writers with Entries (July 2013 Update)

Reviews of Orlando

Devoney Looser in Huntington Library Quarterly

The experiment is unquestionably a successful one. Orlando‘s most obvious utility, as with the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, involves the ability to turn to its entries on more than 800 individual British women writers for specific biographical or bibliographical information. For example, Orlando‘s entry on Jane Austen or Frances Burney is in many ways more useful than the ODNB’s: it supplies more specific dates and employs a hierarchical structure that enables the reader to jump easily to specific portions of each entry. . . . Orlando, in that sense, offers one-stop biographical and book-historical shopping. Orlando’s unique value is in providing ‘materials [that] are capable of a high degree of interaction.’ To be sure, one can do a full-text search in the ODNB for the word ‘antiquarian’ or ‘bluestocking’ and come up with some surprising and valuable results, but in Orlando, the ability to quickly investigate not only such keywords but also circles of writers—particularly by tracing connections among individual writers (male and female)—is unprecedented. One can learn not only about interpersonal connections and literary influences but also about locations, events, occupations, genres, birth position, and other categories that link British women writers (and a smaller selection of male or non-British women writers) to each other.

Two books under review in this essay: William McCarthy’s Anna Letitia Barbauld: Voice of the Enlightenment and Nicholas D. Smith’s The Literary Manuscripts and Letters of Hannah More.

Devoney Looser, “Enlightenment Women’s Voices”, Huntington Library Quarterly 73:2 (June 2010), 295-302. (Available from JSTOR).

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