Writers with Entries

Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles from the Beginnings to the Present is an on-line cultural history generated from the lives and works of women writers. The 1305 writers listed below—as British women, men, and other women—have their own entries in Orlando. Women whose nationality shifted are listed twice. More than 31,000 people and 7,500 organizations are mentioned or discussed somewhere in the textbase (in others’ entries and in the thousands of free-standing events), and dozens of these are writers without dedicated entries. For more information on Orlando visit http://www.cambridge.org/online/orlandoonline

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British Women Writers

 


Other Women Writers

 


Male Writers

 


Summary of Content
1,305 entries (1,025 British women writers, 175 male writers, 166 other women writers—listed twice if their nationality shifted); 13,607 free-standing chronology entries; 26,278 bibliographical listings; 2,499,869 tags; 8,075,393 words (exclusive of tags).

Writers with Entries (Initial Release)

Writers with Entries (January 2007 Update)

Writers with Entries (July 2007 Update)

Writers with Entries (January 2008 Update)

Writers with Entries (July 2008 Update)

Writers with Entries (January 2009 Update)

Writers with Entries (July 2009 Update)

Writers with Entries (January 2010 Update)

Writers with Entries (July 2010 Update)

Writers with Entries (January 2011 Update)

Writers with Entries (July 2011 Update)

Writers with Entries (January 2012 Update)

Writers with Entries (July 2012 Update)

Writers with Entries (January 2013 Update)

Writers with Entries (July 2013 Update)

Reviews of Orlando

Jacqueline Wernimont in Digital Humanities Quarterly

Wernimont takes Orlando, together with Women Writers Online, as “exemplary instances of digital literary scholarship.” Orlando’s DTDs or interpretive markup, she writes, are tools which are generative and transformative, not merely declarative. They "can be read as paratextual with respect to the absent primary texts — the literary texts written by women that Orlando articles discuss. Consequently, we can see this markup as generating a feminist and materialist hermeneutic space through which a reading of primary texts is enabled.”

Jacqueline Wernimont, “Whence Feminism? Assessing Feminist Interventions in Digital Literary Archives” (Digital Humanities Quarterly, 7: 1 (2013), http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/7/1/000156/000156.html#fraiman2008.

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