Funding

The Orlando Project has been generously supported by the Vice-President (Research), the Vice-President (Academic), the Director of Libraries, the Dean of Graduate Studies, the Dean of Arts, and the Department of English and Film Studies at the University of Alberta; and by the School of English and Theatre Studies, the Faculty of Arts, and the Vice-President Research at the University of Guelph.

The first phase in Orlando’s development – creation of the Project infrastructure, the DTDs, and extensive encoding – was funded by a Major Collaborative Research Initiatives Grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, and the Council has since awarded Standard Research Grants to each of Dr. Brown, Dr. Clements, and Dr. Grundy for work on the Orlando narrative history.

The Canada Foundation for Innovation invested in the second phase of Orlando work, the development of the production system capable of exploiting the SGML markup for delivery on the Internet.

Inso Corporation provided the Orlando Project with an in-kind grant of software.

The Orlando Project Team is moved by, and grateful for, personal donations from Don Buchanan and Shirley and Christopher Head.

Reviews of Orlando

In Eighteenth-Century Fiction

… each Orlando Project entry serves the beginning student and advanced researcher alike; it provides an introductory survey of a particular author, but can also function as a source of the latest critical understandings of the author and an encouragement for further advanced research on the themes, influences, and cultural contexts radiating out from that author (377).

[...] Orlando‘s most innovative contribution to humanities scholarship is the modelling of more interpretive, open-ended, thematic database research. The database encourages what it terms “Tag Searches,” in which entries have been tagged to highlight key terms relating to topics unique to literary history; searches can return information relating to biographical details, literary production, literary reception, textual features, and essential or “core tag” details such as dates and names. Orlando allows searches for topics that are not part of a “typical” database search—such as editions, circulation, anthologization, and type of press—but are of keen interest to researchers of reading and writing culture. Orlando thus captures some of the most recent trends in history of the book and material culture studies and translates those interests into research queries that can be performed quickly and efficiently (377).

[...] Orlando enacts exciting new approaches to women’s history, literary history, and the history of the book by translating those approaches into an equally exciting database organization. The textbase features authoritative summaries of women’s lives and writing, new cultural and thematic topics for “tagged” investigations, and innovative processes for performing searches across disciplines and time periods. Perhaps most importantly, Orlando encourages the researcher to see new patterns, new connections, and new traditions—and thus to think in new ways. The transformative effect of women’s writing is keenly felt by the Orlando researcher. With its ability to encourage new thinking in both the entry-level student and the advanced researcher, Orlando deserves a prominent place in the electronic database collection of every research library (378).

Ros Ballaster et al. The Orlando Project (review).” Eighteenth Century Fiction 22:2 (2009): 371-379. (Available from Project MUSE).
1 2 3 4 5
  • Contact Us

    3-5 Humanities Centre,

    Department of English and Film Studies

    University of Alberta

    Edmonton, AB, Canada

    T6G 2E5