Funding

The Orlando Project has been generously supported by the Vice-President (Research), the Vice-President (Academic), the Director of Libraries, the Dean of Graduate Studies, the Dean of Arts, and the Department of English and Film Studies at the University of Alberta; and by the School of English and Theatre Studies, the Faculty of Arts, and the Vice-President Research at the University of Guelph.

The first phase in Orlando’s development – creation of the Project infrastructure, the DTDs, and extensive encoding – was funded by a Major Collaborative Research Initiatives Grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, and the Council has since awarded Standard Research Grants to each of Dr. Brown, Dr. Clements, and Dr. Grundy for work on the Orlando narrative history.

The Canada Foundation for Innovation invested in the second phase of Orlando work, the development of the production system capable of exploiting the SGML markup for delivery on the Internet.

Inso Corporation provided the Orlando Project with an in-kind grant of software.

The Orlando Project Team is moved by, and grateful for, personal donations from Don Buchanan and Shirley and Christopher Head.

Reviews of Orlando

In Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies

The Orlando textbase is one of those online resources that can swallow hours of your life in pleasurable, work-related browsing. This seductive capacity to devour time may or may not be a good thing, depending on whether you should actually be planning a lecture or marking essays, but it is certainly enjoyable and, joking apart, Orlando is also undoubtedly useful. Those working in the long eighteenth century will find it an informative and in some respects unique research tool, with much of interest for scholars of the period.” (277).

Bibliographic citation links allow you to see where just about everything has come from, and also mean that anyone coming fresh to a particular writer has a useful starting-point for building up a bibliography. This is one of the many ways in which Orlando provides something very different from the various printed dictionaries, encyclopaedias and guides to women’s writing available (277).

Gillian Skinner, “Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles from the Beginnings to the Present (review).” Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 22:2 (March 2010), 277-78. (Available from Project MUSE).
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