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Manuscript Studies
Medieval and Early Modern

Bibliography: Early printed books and incunabula: early modern book culture


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Adams, David, and Adrian Armstrong, eds. Print and Power in France and England, 1500-1800. Aldershot, Hants., and Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing, 2006. [* Subject heading: Early modern book culture; early modern education and literacy *]

Baker, David J. On Demand: Writing for the Market in Early Modern England. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2010. [Publisher's description: "In early modern England, while moralists railed against the theater as wasteful and depraved, and inflation whittled away at the value of wages, people attended the theater in droves. This book draws on recent economic history and theory to account for this puzzling consumer behavior. The author shows that during this period, demand itself, with its massed acquisitive energies, transformed the English economy. Over the long sixteenth century, consumption burgeoned, though justifications for it lagged behind. People were in a curious predicament: they practiced consumption on a mass scale but had few acceptable reasons for doing so. In the literary marketplace, authors became adept at accommodating such contradictions, fashioning works that spoke to self-divided consumers: Thomas Nashe castigated and satiated them at the same time; William Shakespeare satirized credit problems; Ben Jonson investigated the problems of global trade; and Robert Burton enlisted readers in a project of economic betterment."] [Contents: Marvelously altered -- Thomas Nashe, Pierce Penilesse, and the demon of consumption -- William Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida: credit risks -- "Allegory of a china shop": Ben Jonson's Entertainment at Britain's Burse and Volpone -- "Idleness is an appendix to nobility": the preface to Robert Burton's The anatomy of melancholy -- Coda: Butter buyers.] [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; early printed books and incunabula: production; authors and authorship; book industries and trade; economics and literature; commerce, commercial; sale of books *]

Barker, Sara K., and Brenda Hosington, eds. Renaissance Cultural Crossroads: Translation, Print and Culture in Britain, 1473-1640. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2012. [* Subject heading: early printed books and incunabula: early modern book culture; book history: early modern; books and reading; translating and interpreting; language and culture *]

Bayman, Anna. Thomas Dekker and the Culture of Pamphleteering in Early Modern London. Farnham, Surrey, and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2014. [Publisher's description: "Thomas Dekker (c.1572-1632) was a prolific playwright and pamphleteer chiefly remembered for his vivid and witty portrayals of everyday London life. This book uses Dekker's prose pamphlets (published between 1613 and 1628) as a way in to a crucial and relatively neglected period of the history of pamphleteering. Under James I, after the aggressive Elizabethan exploitation of the new media, pamphleteers carved out a discursive space in which claims about truth and authority could be deconstructed. Avoiding the dangerous polemic employed by the Marprelate pamphleteers, they utilised playful, deliberately ambiguous language that drew readers' attention to their own literary devices and games. Dekker shows pamphlets to be unstable and roguish, and the nakedly commercial imperatives of the book trade to be central to the world of Jacobean cheap print, as he introduces us to a world in which overlapping and competing discourses jostled for position in London's streets, markets and pulpits. Contributing to the history of print and to the history of Jacobean London, this book also provides an appraisal of the often misunderstood prose works of an author who deserves more attention, especially from historians, than he has so far received. Critics are slowly becoming aware that Dekker was not the straightforward, simple hack writer of so many accounts; his works are complex and richly reward study in their own right as well as in the context of his more famous predecessors and contemporaries. As such this book will further contribute to a post-revisionist historiography of political consciousness and print cultures under the early Stuarts, as well as illuminate the career of a neglected writer."] [Contents: Introduction: "This printing age of ours" -- The pamphlets in London -- Debts of various kinds: Dekker's relationships -- The Eares brothell: Dekker's London -- Vice, folly and rogues -- Sin, plague and the politics of peace.] [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; history of the book *]

Beal, Peter and Grace Ioppolo, eds. Elizabeth I and the Culture of Writing. London: British Library, 2007. [Publisher's description: "As Queen of England for nearly forty-five years, Elizabeth I left behind a formidable and fascinating paper trail. She wrote copiously, including works in verse and in prose, original works and translations, treatises, prayers, and speeches, but as the essays collected in Elizabeth I and the Culture of Writing demonstrate, Elizabeth did not simply participate in the cultural phenomenon of the growth of writing--as the most powerful person in Britain, her example played an instrumental part in its spread. These essays consider all facets of Elizabeth's role in the culture of writing from the private to the political and bring to light many newly discovered documents. Ultimately this textual record of the Queen's reign reveals a dauntingly complex identity--at once sovereign, spectator, friend, woman, creator, muse, and icon."] [Contents: "The Queen's own hand: a preliminary account," H. R. Woudhuysen; "Elizabeth I and her 'good George': unpublished letters," Katherine Duncan-Jones; "'Your Majesties most humble faythfullest and most affectionate seruant': the Earl of Essex constructs himself and his Queen in the Hulton letters," Grace Ioppolo; "Delightful teaching: Queen Elizabeth and Sidney's Arcadia," Blair Worden; "The Queen and the hermit: the 'tale of Hemetes' (1575)," Gabriel Heaton; "'From a seruant of Diana' to the libellers of Robert Cecil: the transmission of songs written for Queen Elizabeth I," Joshua Eckhardt; "This remebrance of the New Year: books given to Queen Elizabeth as New Year's gifts," Jane Lawson; "Elizabeth's execution warrants," Peter Beal; "Queen Elizabeth prays for the living and the dead," Steven W. May.] [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; authors and authorship; intellectual life; Elizabeth I, Queen of England, 1533-1603 *]

Birrell, T. A. Aspects of Book Culture in Early Modern England. Ed. Jos Bloom. Variorum Collected Studies. Farnham, Surrey, and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2013. [* Subject heading: early printed books and incunabula: early modern book culture; book history: early modern; books and reading *]

Brooks, Douglas A. From Playhouse to Printing House: Drama and Authorship in Early Modern England. Cambridge Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; history of printing; authors and authorship; literary transmission *]

Brooks, Douglas A., ed. Printing and Parenting in Early Modern England. Women and Gender in the Early Modern World. Aldershot, Hants., and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2005. [Publisher's description: "The relation between procreation and authorship, between reproduction and publication, has a long history. In this volume, renowned scholars demonstrate that during the early modern period, the awkward, incomplete transition from manuscript to print brought on by the invention of the printing press temporarily exposed and disturbed the epistemic foundation of English culture. As a result, the discursive field of parenting was profoundly transformed."] [* Subject heading: early printed books and incunabula: early modern book culture; book history: early modern; literacy and education, early modern; early printed books; authors and authorship; reading and readers (female, woman, women) *]

Burner, Sandra A. James Shirley: A Study of Literary Coteries and Patronage in Seventeenth-Century England. Stony Brook, NY: State University of New York; Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1988. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; history of publishing; authors and authorship; literary transmission reading and readers (patronage) *]

Cormack, Bradin, and Carla Mazzio. Book Use, Book Theory, 1500-1700. [Exhibition catalogue.] Chicago: University of Chicago Library, 2005. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; history of the book *]

Cormack, Bradin, and Carla Mazzio. "Book Use, Book Theory (1500-1700)." Web exhibits, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library. <http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/webexhibits/bookusebooktheory/>. ["This Web exhibit is based on the exhibit 'Book Use, Book Theory: 1500 - 1700,' held in the Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library, March-June 2005." Introduction: "What does it mean to use a book, rather than read it? How do books define the conditions of their own use, and in so doing imagine the social and theoretical significance of that use? This exhibition explores the inseparable relationship between technologies of book use and forms of thought and theory in the period between 1500 and 1700. Prioritizing the material and social phenomenon of book use, in contrast to the relatively abstracted notion of reading, foregrounds the place of practice in the history of the book. It thereby disrupts clear distinctions between author and reader, text and context, the book as knowledge and the book as material object. Understanding the early book as a practical tool makes it possible to see its many material forms (e.g., binding, typography, title page, margins, index, illustrations) in terms of the knowledge systems that both shaped and were shaped by them."] [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; history of the book *]

Daybell, James, and Peter Hinds, eds. Material Readings of Early Modern Culture: Texts and Social Practices, 1580-1730. Early Modern Literature in History. Basingstoke, Hants., and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. [Contents: "Introduction: Material Matters," James Daybaell and Peter Hinds. Part 1: The Material Letter. "Losing and Regaining the Material Meanings of Epistolary and Gift Texts," Cedric C. Brown; "Secret Letters in Elizabethan England," James Daybell; "Copycopia; or, The Uses of Copied Correspondence in Manuscript Culture: A case study," Andrew Gordon. Part 2: The Material Book: Print and Social Practices of Reading. "Possessing the Visual: The Materiality of Visual Print Culture in Later Stuart Britain," Mark Knights; "'Hackney Poets and Hireling Pamphleteers': Professional Authorship and the Book Trade in Late-Seventeenth-Century London," Peter Hinds; "Early Modern Sermon Paratexts and the Religious Politics of Reading," Mary Ann Lund; "Textuality, Privacy and Politics: Katherine Philips's Poems in Manuscript and Print," Gillian Wright. Part 3: Material Manuscripts. "Neighbourhood, Social Networks, and the Making of a Family's Manuscript Poetry Collection: The Case of British Library Additional MS 25707," Arthur F. Marotti; "Casting Off Blanks: Hidden Structures in Early Modern Paper Books," Jonathan Gibson; "The Use and Re-Use of Early-Seventeenth-Century Student Notebooks: Inside and Outside the University," Christopher Burlinson; "'The art of Numbering well': Late Seventeenth-Century Arithmetic Manuscripts Compiled by Quaker Girls," Victoria E. Burke.] [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; history of the book; early printed books and incunabula; literacy and education; medieval and early modern (readers and reading); authorship; social aspects; English literature; seventeenth century; letter writing; transmission texts *]

Dolan, Frances E. Whores of Babylon: Catholicism, Gender and Seventeenth-Century Print Culture. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1999. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; history of printing; early printed books (female, woman, women); literacy and religion *]

Duggan, Mary Kay. "Reading Liturgical Books." In Incunabula and their Readers: Printing, Selling and Using Books in the Fifteenth Century. Ed. Kristian Jensen. London: British Library, 2003. Pp. 71-81. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; literacy and education, medieval and early modern (reading and readers); incunabula; history of printing (fifteenth-century) *]

Echard, Siân. Printing the Middle Ages. Material Texts. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008. [Publisher's description: "In Printing the Middle Ages Siân Echard looks to the postmedieval, postmanuscript lives of medieval texts, seeking to understand the lasting impact on both the popular and scholarly imaginations of the physical objects that transmitted the Middle Ages to the English-speaking world."] [* Subject heading: early printed books and incunabula: early modern book culture; book history: early modern; literary transmission; reception history; Middle English literature; relation of manuscripts and books; Geoffrey Chaucer (early printed editions); John Lydgate (early printed editions); John Gower (early printed editions) *]

Eisermann, Falk. "Mixing Pop and Politics: Origins, Transmission, and Readers of Illustrated Broadsides in Fifteenth-Century Germany." In Incunabula and their Readers: Printing, Selling and Using Books in the Fifteenth Century. Ed. Kristian Jensen. London: British Library, 2003. Pp. 159-177. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; history of printing (fifteenth-century); literary transmission; reading and readers; ballads and broadsides *]

Ellinghuasen, Laurie. Labor and Writing in Early Modern England, 1567-1667. Aldershot, Hants., and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2008. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; early modern education and literacy; authors and authorship; labour, work, working *]

Ezell, Margaret J. M. Social Authorship and the Advent of Print. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999. [Publisher's description: "How did academic and literary writers living in rural Britain in the 1680s establish their careers and find audiences for their work? What factors influenced the choices of essayists and dramatists who lived outside London and the university cities? Who read the works of regional poets and natural scientists and how were they circulated? In this engaging study of the development of literary industry and authorship in early modern Britain, Margaret Ezell examines the forces at work at a time when print technology was in competition with older manuscript authorship practices and the legal status of authors was being transformed. She also explores the literary concepts that subsequently developed out of new commercial practices, such as the rise of the 'classic' text and the marketing of uniform series editions."] [Contents: Introduction: The Changing Culture of Authorship and the History of the Book -- The Social Author: Manuscript Culture, Writers, and Readers -- Literary Pirates and Reluctant Authors: Some Peculiar Institutions of Authorship -- The Very Early Career of Alexander Pope -- Getting into Print: London and the Social Author -- Getting into Print: Literary Life outside London -- Making a Classic: The Advent of the Literary Series and the National Author.] [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; history of printing; authors and authorship *]

Ford, Margaret Lane. "Private Ownership of Printed Books." In The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain, Vol. 3: 1400-1557. Ed. Lotte Hellinga and J. B. Trapp. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. Pp. 205-228. [* Subject Heading: early modern book culture; early printed books: ownership and collecting *]

Frye, Susan. Pens and Needles: Women's Textualities in Early Modern England. Material Texts. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010. [Contents: Political designs: Elizabeth Tudor, Mary Stuart, and Bess of Hardwick -- Miniatures and manuscripts: Levina Teerlinc, Jane Segar, and Esther Inglis as professional artisans -- Sewing connections: narratives of agency in women's domestic needlework -- Staging women's relations to textiles in Shakespeare's Othello and Cymbeline -- Mary Sidney Wroth: clothing romance.] [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; early printed books and incunabula: production; women and gender studies; readers and reading (woman, women, female) *]

Fudge, John D. Commerce and Print in the Early Reformation. The Northern World 28. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2007. [Publisher's description: "Communications and the spread of nonconformist views were key to the spiritual upheaval that gripped many parts of northern Europe in the 1520s. Emphasising economic and cultural hegemony, this book explores the transmission of innovation through networks of trade. Interrelated themes include commercial typography, legal and illicit book distribution, espionage, and censorship. These are elaborated through a series of episodes involving printers and patrician oligarchs, spies and fugitives, and pamphleteers and entrepreneurs. The accent on commerce and print broadens the interpretive scope for study of the early Reformation beyond national, political, or exclusively religious contexts. It also leads to a reassessment of some conventional assumptions about merchants as distributors of Scripture texts and reformist propaganda."] [Contents: Commerce, Books, and Decrees -- Bonfires and Threatening Words -- Diplomacy and Espionage -- Subversion and Prosecution.] [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; early printed books and incunabula: production; authors and authorship; book industries and trade; economics and literature; commerce, commercial; sale of books; religion and literature; history of printing *]

Fumerton, Patricia, Anita Guerrini, eds. Ballads and Broadsides in Britain, 1500-1800. Farnham, Surrey, and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2010. [Publisher's description: "Bringing together diverse scholars to represent the full historical breadth of the early modern period, and a wide range of disciplines (literature, women's studies, folklore, ethnomusicology, art history, media studies, the history of science, and history), Ballads and Broadsides in Britain, 1500-1800 offers an unprecedented perspective on the development and cultural practice of popular print in early modern Britain. Fifteen essays explore major issues raised by the broadside genre in the early modern period: the different methods by which contemporaries of the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries collected and "appreciated" such early modern popular forms; the preoccupation in the early modern period with news and especially monsters; the concomitant fascination with and representation of crime and the criminal subject; the technology and formal features of early modern broadside print together with its bearing on gender, class, and authority/authorship; and, finally, the nationalizing and internationalizing of popular culture through crossings against (and sometimes with) cultural Others in ballads and broadsides of the time."] [Contents: "Introduction: straws in the wind," Patricia Fumerton and Anita Guerrini; "Remembering by dismembering: databases, archiving, and the recollection of seventeenth-century broadside ballads," Patricia Fumerton; "The art of printing was fatal: print commerce and the idea of oral tradition in long eighteenth-century ballad discourse," Paula McDowell; "Child's ballads and the broadside conundrum," Mary Ellen Brown; "Journalism vs. tradition in the early English ballads of the murdered sweetheart," Thomas Pettit; "Do you take this hog-faced woman to be your wedded wife?" Tassie Gniady; "Advertising monstrosity: broadsides and human exhibition in early eighteenth-century London," Anita Guerrini; "'And I my vowe did keepe': oath making, subjectivity, and husband murder in 'murderous wife' ballads," Simone Chess; "Tracking the petty traitor across genres," Frances Dolan; "Ballads and the emotional life of crime," Joy Wiltenburg; "The maiden's bloody garland: Thomas Warton and the elite appropriation of popular song," Steve Newman; "'Ne sutor ultra crepidam': political cobblers and broadside ballads in late seventeenth-century England," Angela McShane; "William Hogarth's pregnant ballad sellers and the engraver's matrix," Elizabeth Mitchell; "War and the media in border minstrelsy: the ballad of 'Chevy Chase,'" Ruth Perry; "Heroines gritty and tender, printed and oral, late-breaking and traditional: revisiting the Anglo-American female warrior," Dianne Dugaw; "Music and Indians in John Gay's 'Polly,'" Noelle Chao; "Afterword: ballad futures," by Bruce R. Smith.] [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; history of the book; early printed books and incunabula; popular print; history of printing (sixteenth- and seventeenth-century); ballads and broadsides *]

Gillespie, Alexandra. Print Culture and the Medieval Author: Chaucer, Lydgate, and Their Books, 1473-1557. Oxford English Monographs. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. [* Subject heading: early printed books and incunabula: early modern book culture; book history: early modern; literary transmission; reception history; Middle English literature; relation of manuscripts and books; Geoffrey Chaucer (early printed editions); John Lydgate (early printed editions) *]

Greene, Jody. The Trouble with Ownership: Literary Property and Authorial Liability in England, 1660-1730. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005. [* Subject heading: early printed books and incunabula: early modern book culture; book history: early modern; authors and authorship; book ownership and collecting; intellectual property and responsibility *]

Gutjahr, Paul C. An American Bible: A History of the Good Book in the United States, 1777-1880. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1999. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; Bible, history of; reading and readers *]

Hindman, Sandra, and Laura Light. Paths to Reform: "Things New and Old." Intro. David Lyle Jeffrey. TextManuscripts 3. Paris and New York: Les Enluminures, 2013. [Publisher's description: This catalogue presents a set of manuscripts which illustrate "the evolution and different facts of Christianity which led up to the Protestant Reformation."] [* Subject heading: early printed books and incunabula: early modern book culture; book history: early modern; religious literature; reform movements; catalogues and finding aids (thematic) *]

Hirst, Derek, and Richard Strier, eds. Writing and Political Engagement in Seventeenth-Century England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; history of publishing (censorship); authors and authorship; literary transmission; reading and readers *]

Hosington, Brenda M. "Translation, Early Printing, and Gender in England, 1484-1535." Florilegium 23.1 (2006): 41-67. [Florilegium 23.1 is a special issue entitled "Confronting the Present with the Past: Essays in Honour of Sheila Delany," ed. A. E. Christa Canitz and Andrew Taylor.] [Abstract: "The introduction of printing to England at the beginning of the early modern period intersected with an ongoing interest in matters concerning the querelle des femmes. One result was the production of fourteen translations from Latin and French, twelve of medieval and two of humanist origin. Discussing all fourteen translations, this article proposes an overview of the varying ways in which translation, publishing, and gender were closely intertwined. The source texts, spanning almost four hundred years, varied in provenance, style, and genre and appealed to different audiences. The translating methods used are equally varied, but all owe something to what Sheila Delany calls 'the literature of sexual politics.'"] [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; early printed books and incunabula; women and gender studies; reading and readers (female, woman, women) *]

Hotchkiss, Valerie R., and Fred C. Robinson. English in Print from Caxton to Shakespeare to Milton. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 2008. [Publisher's description: "English in Print from Caxton to Shakespeare to Milton examines the history of early English books, exploring the concept of putting the English language into print with close study of the texts, the formats, the audiences, and the functions of English books. Lavishly illustrated with more than 130 full-color images of stunning rare books, this volume investigates a full range of issues regarding the dissemination of English language and culture through printed works, including the standardization of typography, grammar, and spelling; the appearance of popular literature; and the development of school grammars and dictionaries. Valerie Hotchkiss and Fred C. Robinson provide engaging descriptions of more than a hundred early English books drawn from the Rare Book and Manuscript Library at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and the Elizabethan Club of Yale University. The study nearly mirrors the chronological coverage of Pollard and Redgrave's famous Short-Title Catalogue (1475-1640), beginning with William Caxton, England's first printer, and ending with John Milton, the English language's most eloquent defender of the freedom of the press in his Areopagitica of 1644."] [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; literary transmission; history of publishing; William Caxton; John Milton *]

Howsam, Leslie. Old Books and New Histories: An Orientation to Studies in Book and Print Culture. Studies in Book and Print Culture. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2006. [Publisher's description: "Rooted within three major academic disciplines--history, literary studies, and bibliography--that focus respectively upon the book as a cultural transaction, a literary text, and a material artefact, Old Books and New Histories serves as a guide to this rich but sometimes confusing territory, explaining how different scholarly approaches to what may appear to be the same entity can lead to divergent questions and contradictory answers."] [* Subject heading: early printed books and incunabula: early modern book culture; book history: early modern; history of the book: theory and approaches *]

Jensen, Kristian. "Printing the Bible in the Fifteenth Century: Devotion, Philology and Commerce." In Incunabula and their Readers: Printing, Selling and Using Books in the Fifteenth Century. Ed. Kristian Jensen. London: British Library, 2003. Pp. 115-138. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; Bible, history of; book industries and trade; economics and literature; commerce, commercial; sale of books *]

Kastan, David Scott. Shakespeare and the Book. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; history of publishing; early modern books; authors and authorship *]

Kate, Van Orden. Music, Authorship, and the Book in the First Century of Print. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2013. [Contents: The world of books -- Music books and their authors -- Authors of lyric -- The book of poetry becomes a book of music -- Resisting the press: performance.] [* Subject heading: early printed books and incunabula: early modern book culture; book history: early modern; music printing; 16th century; music genres and styles; music publishing *]

Kearney, James [Joseph]. The Incarnate Text: Imagining the Book in Reformation England. Material Texts. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2009. [Publisher's description: "In the course of the Reformation, artistic representation famously came under attack. The iconoclastic impulse that sparked these attacks however, proved remarkably productive, generating a profusion of theological, polemical and literary writing from Catholics and Protestants alike. The Incarnate Text tells the story of how this crisis of the book helped to change the way the modern world apprehends both texts and things."] [Contents: Relics of the mind: Erasmian humanism and textual presence -- Rewriting the letter: Textual icons and linguistic artifacts in Book I of The Faerie Queene -- Reading of the damned: Doctor Faustus and textual conversion -- Book, trinket, fetish: letters and mastery in The Tempest -- Epilogue: Bacon's impossible book.] [* Subject heading: early printed books and incunabula: early modern book culture; book history: early modern; religious literature; reform movements *]

Kintgen, Eugene R. Reading in Tudor England. Pittsburgh Series in Composition, Literacy, and Culture. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1996. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; literacy and education, medieval and early modern (readers and reading) *]

Knapp, James A. Illustrating the Past in Early Modern England: The Representation of History in Printed Books. Aldershot, Hants., and Brookfield, VT: Ashgate, 2003. [* Subject heading: early printed books and incunabula: early modern book culture; book history: early modern; history of printing; early printed books; early modern books; illustration *]

Light, Laura, and Sandra Hindman. Before the King James Bible. TextManuscripts 2. Paris and New York: Les Enluminures, 2012. [Publisher's description: "This catalogue explains the pre-history of the King James Bible, 'the book that changed the world,' with a complete introduction and shorts essays on 37 manuscripts (organized in five different categories)."] [* Subject heading: early printed books and incunabula: early modern book culture; book history: early modern; religious literature; catalogues and finding aids (thematic); sacred texts *]

Longfellow, Erica. Women and Religious Writing in Early Modern England. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; literacy and education, medieval and early modern; reading and readers (female, woman, women); religion; religious non-conformity *]

Myers, Robin, Harris Michael, and Mandelbrote Giles, eds. Books for Sale: The Advertising and Promotion of Print since the Fifteenth Century. Publishing Pathways. New Castle, DE: Oak Knoll Press; London: British Library, 2009. [Contents: "Sale advertisements for books printed in the fifteenth century," Lotte Hellinga; "Selling the Biblia Regia: the marketing and distribution methods for Christopher Plantin's polyglot Bible," Julianne Simpson; "Printed advertisements: some variations in their use around 1700," Michael Harris; "Advertising books in eighteenth-century Paris: evidence from Waddesdon Manor's trade card collection," Phillippa Plock; "Many good books: advertising and the book trade in early nineteenth-century Ireland," Charles Benson; "From protection to promotion: the uses of the book jacket," Alan Powers; "The use and effect of literary prizes in the late twentieth century," Peter Straus; "Advertising books online: yesterday, today and tomorrow," Udo Göllmann.] [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; book industries and trade; economics and literature; commerce, commercial; sale of books; books: marketing and advertising; booksellers and bookselling *]

Narveson, Kate. Bible Readers and Lay Writers in Early Modern England. Material Readings in Early Modern Culture. Farnham, Surrey, and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2012. [Contents: Reading the Bible: clerical prescriptions and lay reading practices -- The emergence of lay composition -- Application to the self: reading and the restructuring of identity -- Recording identity: scripturalist devotion among ordinary layfolk -- Discursive horizons and the question of gender -- The devotional page and the schoolroom of print -- Grace Mildmay's meditations: love letters from God and their Scriptural authorization.] [* Subject heading: early printed books and incunabula: early modern book culture; book history: early modern; religious literature; reform movements; Bible, devotional use; reading in early modern England *]

Nickel, Holger. "Orations Crossing the Alps." In Incunabula and their Readers: Printing, Selling and Using Books in the Fifteenth Century. Ed. Kristian Jensen. London: British Library, 2003. Pp. 153-158. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; incunabula; literary transmission *]

Norton, David. A Textual History of the King James Bible. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; Bible, history of *]

Parker, Holt N. "Women and Humanism: Nine Factors for the Woman Learning." Viator 35 (2004): 581-616. [Abstract: "This article attempts a survey of the phenomenon of the learned woman in the Renaissance to 1600. It singles out and examines nine factors that increased the possibility of a girl receiving a humanist education; each modifies the notion of humanism exclusively as preparation for men in public life: 1) It helped to be royal. 2) It helped to be noble. 3) It helped to be magnificent. 4) It helped to be at court. 5) It helped to have a humanist father. 6) It helped to have a brother. 7) It helped to have parents who believed in the moral value of humanitas. 8) It helped to be Protestant. 9) It helped to love learning."] [* Subject heading: early printed books and incunabula: early modern book culture; book history: early modern; early modern education and literacy; reading and readers (female); women; gender studies *]

Partridge, Stephen. "Wynkyn de Worde's Manuscript Source for the Canterbury Tales: Evidence from the Glosses." Chaucer Review 41 (2006-2007): 325-359. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (glossaries); literary transmission; incunabula; relationship of manuscripts to printed books; copy-texts and exemplars; marginalia; Wynkyn de Worde; Geoffrey Chaucer (early printed editions) *]

Patterson, Annabel M. Censorship and Interpretation: The Conditions of Writing and Reading in Early Modern England. Madison, WI, and London: University of Wisconsin Press, 1990. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; history of publishing (censorship); reading and readers; early modern education and literacy *]

Patterson, Mary Hampson. Domesticating the Reformation: Protestant Best Sellers, Private Devotion, and the Revolution of English Piety. Madison: Fairleigh Dickinson University Presses, 2007. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; literacy and religon; relious non-conformity; lay piety *]

Peters, Kate. Print Culture and the Early Quakers. Cambridge Studies in Early Modern British History. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; religion; religious non-conformity; early modern education and literacy; history of printing *]

Quitslund, Jon A. "Spenser and the Patronesses of the Fowre Hymnes: 'Ornaments of All True Love and Beautie.'" In Silent but for the Word: Tudor Women as Patrons, Translators, and Writers of Religious Works. Ed. Margaret Patterson Hannay. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 1985. Pp. 184-202. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; patrons and patronage; readers and reading (female, woman, women); Edmund Spenser *]

Raymond, Joad, ed. Cheap Print in Britain and Ireland to 1660. Oxford History of Popular Print Culture 1. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2011. [Publisher's description: "From the early 16th century through to the later 17th, governments, institutions, and individuals learned to use cheaply-produced printed texts to inform, entertain, and persuade. This collection of essays examines the developing role of popular printed texts in the first two centuries of print in Britain and Ireland."] [Contents: "The origins of popular print culture," Joad Raymond; "England and Wales," Michael J. Braddick; "Scotland," Hamish Mathison; "Ireland," Jane Ohlmeyer; "Popular, plebian, culture: historical definitions," Tim Harris; "The development of the book trade in Britain," Joad Raymond; "Printing, learning and the unlearned," Anna Bayman; "Popular literacy and society," Heidi Brayman Hackel; "Reading strategies," Stephen B. Dobranski; "Oral culture and popular print," Julie Crawford; "Manuscript culture and popular print," Andrew McRae; "Libel," Alastair Bellany; "The social life of books," William H. Sherman; "France and Spain," Roger Chartier; "Italy," Ottavia Niccoli; "The Netherlands," Margit Thofner; "Germany," Alisha Rankin; "Religion and cheap print," Peter Lake; "Rhetoric," David Colclough; "Political argument," Markku Peltonen; "Images, representation and counter-representation," Helen Pierce; "Women and print," Sara Mendelson; "London," Mark Jenner; "Parliament and the press," Thomas Cogswell; "War," Nicole Greenspan; "Ballads and broadsides," Angela McShane; "Romance," Lori Humphrey Newcomb; "News," Joad Raymond; "Science," Simon Schaffer; "Popular medical writing," Mary Fissell; "Almanacs and prognostications," Lauren Kassell; "Popular history," Peter Burke; "Pamphlets," Jason Peacey; "Chapbooks," Lori Humphrey Newcomb; "Sermons, primers and prayerbooks," Mary Morrissey; "Popular didactic literature," Natasha Glaisyer; "Playbooks," Zachary Lesser; "1535," Tracey A. Sowerby; "1553," Cathy Schrank; "1588-1589," Jesse M. Lander; "1603," Matthew Woodcock; "1625," Thomas Cogswell; "1641," Jason McElligott; "1649," Martin Dzelzainis; "1660," Gerald MacLean.] [* Subject heading: early printed books and incunabula: early modern book culture; book history: early modern; popular culture; history of printing; history of publishing *]

Robertson, Randy. Censorship and Conflict in Seventeenth-Century England: The Subtle Art of Division. Philadelphia: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2009. [Publisher's description: The book "offers a detailed picture of early modern censorship and investigates the pressures that censorship exerted on seventeenth-century authors, printers, and publishers. In the 1600s, Britain witnessed a civil war, the judicial execution of a king, the restoration of his son, and an unremitting struggle among crown, parliament, and people for sovereignty and the right to define 'liberty and property.' This battle, sometimes subtle, sometimes bloody, entailed a struggle for the control of language and representation. Robertson offers a richly detailed study of this 'censorship contest' and of the craft that writers employed to outflank the licensers. He argues that for most parties, victory, not diplomacy or consensus, was the ultimate goal. This book differs from most recent works in analyzing both the mechanics of early modern censorship and the poetics that the licensing system produced--the forms and pressures of self-censorship. Among the issues that Robertson addresses in this book are the workings of the licensing machinery, the designs of art and obliquity under a regime of censorship, and the involutions of authorship attendant on anonymity."] [Contents: Introduction -- "Consider What May Come of It": Prynne's Play and Charles's Stately Theater -- Lovelace and the "Barbed Censurers" -- Free Speech, Fallibility, and the Public Sphere: Milton Among the Skeptics -- The Delicate Arts of Anonymity and Attribution -- The Battle of the Books: Swift's Leviathan and the End of Licensing -- Conclusion: Dividing Lines: 1689, 1695, and Afterward ] [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; censorship, history of; Stationers' Company; Star Chamber; literature and politics; William Prynne, Histriomastix; Richard Lovelace; John Milton; Andrew Marvell; John Dryden; Jonathan Swift *]

Saenger, Paul Henry, and Kimberly Van Kampen, eds. The Bible as Book: The First Printed Editions. New Castle: Oak Knoll, 1999. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; Bible, history of *]

Snook, Edith. Women, Reading, and the Cultural Politics of Early Modern England. Women and Gender in the Early Modern World. Aldershot, Hants., and Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing, 2005. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; literacy and education, medieval and early modern; reading and readers (female, woman, women) *]

Summit, Jennifer. Memory's Library: Medieval Books in Early Modern England. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008. [* Subject heading: early printed books and incunabula: early modern book culture; book history: early modern; literary transmission; reception history; Middle English literature; relation of manuscripts and books; libraries and repositories (historical); ownership and collecting; Sir Robert Cotton *]

Tomita, Soko, comp. A Bibliographical Catalogue of Italian Books Printed in England, 1558-1603. Anglo-Italian Renaissance Studies. Farnham, Surrey, and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2009. [Publisher's description: "Through entries on 291 Italian books (451 editions) published in England during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, covering the years 1558-1603, this catalogue represents a summary of current research and knowledge of diffusion of Italian culture on English literature in this period. It also provides a foundation for new work on Anglo-Italian relations in Elizabethan England. Mary Augusta Scott's 1916 Elizabethan Translations from the Italian forms the basis for the catalogue; Soko Tomita adds 59 new books and eliminates 23 of Scott's original entries. . . . In an attempt to restore each book to its original status, each entry is concerned not only with the physical book, but with the human elements guiding it through production: the relationship with the author, editor, translator, publisher, book-seller, and patron are all recounted as important players in the exploration of cultural significance. Renaissance Anglo-Italian relations were marked by both patriotism and xenophobia; this catalogue provides reliable and comprehensive information about books and publication as well as concrete evidence of what elements of Italian culture the English responded to and how Italian culture was acclimatized into Elizabethan England."] [* Subject heading: Early Modern printed books (catalogues); Italian imprints in England (16th century); translation; literary transmission *]

Wakelin, Daniel. Humanism, Reading, and English Literature, 1430-1530. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. [Publisher's description: "The first book to identify the origins of the humanist tradition in England in the 15th century. Humanism is usually thought to come to England in the early sixteenth century. In this book, however, Daniel Wakelin uncovers the almost unknown influences of humanism on English literature in the preceding hundred years."] [* Subject heading: early printed books and incunabula: early modern book culture; book history: early modern; literacy and education, medieval and early modern (readers and reading) *]

Wall, Wendy. The Imprint of Gender: Authorship and Publication in the English Renaissance. Renaissance Literature: Gender Studies. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1993. [Publisher's description: "What did it mean to be published at the end of the sixteenth century? While in polite circles gentlemen exchanged handwritten letters, published authors risked association with the low-born masses. Examining a wide range of published material including sonnets, pageants, prefaces, narrative poems, and title pages, Wendy Wall considers how the idea of authorship was shaped by the complex social controversies generated by publication during the English Renaissance."] [Contents: Introduction: To be "a man in print" -- Turning sonnet: The politics and poetics of sonnet circulation -- Author(iz)ing royal spectacle: the politics of publishing pageantry -- Prefatorial disclosures: "violent enlargement" and the voyeuristic text -- Impersonating the manuscript: cross-dressed authors and literary pseudomorphs -- Dancing in a net: the problems of female authorship -- Afterword: the politics of print.] [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; authors and authorship; gender; women and literature (woman, female) *]

Watt, Tessa. Cheap Print and Popular Piety. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992. ["In this provocative study, Watt challenges the traditional divide between a pre-Reformation culture of orality and image and the ensuing Protestant culture of the written word. Cheap print (broadside ballads, chapbooks, wall hangings) offers a response to this 'confrontational' model, since godly ballads and other popular devotional materials juxtapose word and image in ways that suggest gradual modification of traditional piety, rather than a wholesale rejection of previous values. In this light, Watt suggests that print and literacy should not be viewed as 'unchanging technologies which unilaterally replaced other forms of communication.' Instead, as the ballads and other examples of cheap print make clear, such communication is only part of a much larger network of seeing, reading, remembering, and hearing which comprised the post-Reformation devotional (and consumer) experience." (Joshua Fisher, Ballad web-site [URL: students.washington.edu/jbfisher/ballad_pages/index.html])] [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; printing, history of; literacy and religion; religious non-conformity; lay piety *]

White, Eric. Editio Princeps: A History of the Gutenberg Bible. London: Harvey Miller, 2017. [Publisher's description: "The Gutenberg Bible is widely recognized as Europe's first printed book, a book that forever changed the world. However, despite its initial impact, fame was fleeting: for the better part of three centuries the Bible was virtually forgotten; only after two centuries of tenacious and contentious scholarship did it attain its iconic status as a monument of human invention. Editio princeps: A History of the Gutenberg Bible is the first book to tell the whole story of Europe's first printed edition, describing its creation at Mainz circa 1455, its impact on fifteenth-century life and religion, its fall into oblivion during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and its rediscovery and rise to worldwide fame during the centuries thereafter. This comprehensive study examines the forty-nine surviving Gutenberg Bibles, and fragments of at least fourteen others, in the chronological order in which they came to light. Combining close analysis of material clues within the Bibles themselves with fresh documentary discoveries, the book reconstructs the history of each copy in unprecedented depth, from its earliest known context through every change of ownership up to the present day. Along the way it introduces the colorful cast of proud possessors, crafty booksellers, observant travelers, and scholarly librarians who shaped our understanding of Europe's first printed book. Bringing the 'biographies' of all the Gutenberg Bibles together for the first time, this richly illustrated study contextualizes both the historic cultural impact of the editio princeps and its transformation into a world treasure."] [* Subject heading: early printed books and incunabula: early modern book culture; book history: early modern; books and reading; early printed books: ownership and collecting; history of antiquarianism; textual transmission; reception history; literature and society; history of the book *]

Wilson, Bronwen. The World in Venice: Print, the City, and Early Modern Identity. Studies in Book and Print Culture. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2004. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; history of printing; early modern books; history of publishing *]

Wilson, Katharine. Fictions of Authorship in Late Elizabethan Narratives: Euphues in Arcadia. Oxford English Monographs. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2006. [* Subject heading: early modern book culture; history of printing (fifteenth century); authors and authorship *]

Zarnowiecki, Matthew. Fair Copies: Reproducing English Lyric from Tottel to Shakespeare. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2014. [* Subject heading: early printed books and incunabula: early modern book culture; book history: early modern; history of printing; Richard Tottel, Tottel's Miscellany; William Shakespeare; renaissance poetry; lyric verse; songs *]



Bibliography: [ Some basic resources ] | [ General bibliography ] | [ History of the book ] | [ Literacy and education, medieval and early modern (readers and reading) ] | [ Archival research ] | [ Forgeries / bibliographic fraud ] | [ Dictionaries (historical) ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: Early Modern book culture ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: production ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: catalogues ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: facsimiles ] | [ Diplomatics: the study of historical documents ] | [ Printing, history of ] | [ Publishing, history of ] | [ Libraries and repositories, history of; book collecting ] | [ Manuscript culture ] | [ Manuscript culture: patronage ] | [ Manuscripts: codicology ] | [ Manuscripts: paleography ] | [ Manuscript production ] | [ Manuscript production: scribes and scribal practices ] | [ Manuscript production: decoration and illustration ] | [ Manuscript production: material culture (paper, bindings, etc.) ] | [ Manuscripts: catalogues and finding aids ] | [ Manuscripts: facsimiles and facsimile editions ] | [ Sigillography (the study of seals) ] | [ Textual criticism and editing ] | [ Keyword search of entire bibliography ]


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© 1998, 2017 Stephen R. Reimer
English; University of Alberta; Edmonton, Canada
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Created: 30 July 2015; Last revised: 27 Nov. 2017
URLs verified: 27 Nov. 2017

email: Stephen.Reimer@UAlberta.Ca
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