[Image: Herebert page]

Manuscript Studies
Medieval and Early Modern

Bibliography: Manuscript Production


You are here: > Main Page > Bibliography > Manuscript Production


Alexander, J[onathan] J[ames] G[raham]. Medieval Illuminators and their Methods of Work. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1992. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination) *]

Alexander, J[onathan] J[ames] G[raham]. The Decorated Letter. New York: G. Braziller, 1978. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination) *]

Backhouse, Janet. The Illuminated Page: Ten Centuries of Manuscript Painting in the British Library. London: British Library; Toronto and Buffalo: University of Toronto Press, 1997. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination) *]

Banks, Doris H. Medieval Manuscript Bookmaking: A Bibliographic Guide. Metuchen, NJ, and London: Scarecrow Press, 1989. [Rev.: (Laura Light) Speculum 67 (1992): 371-372 (considers this book to be unreliable).] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; general bibliography (study of the book) *]

Beadle, Richard. "English Autograph Writings of the Later Middle Ages: Some Preliminaries." In Gli autografi medievali: Problemi paleografici e filologici; Atti del convegno di studio della Fondazione Ezio Franceschini, Erice, 25 settembre-2 ottobre 1990. Ed. Paolo Chiesa and Lucia Pinelli. Pref. Claudio Leonardi. Quaderni di cultura mediolatina 5. Spoleto: Centro Italiano di Studi Sull'alto Medioevo, 1994. Pp. 249-268. [A catalogue of autograph manuscripts by medieval English authors (including Thomas Hoccleve, William Herebert, and others), with some "preliminary" discussion of the significance of such manuscripts.] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; authorial copies (autographs, holographs) *]

Bell, H. E. "The Price of Books in Medieval England." The Library 4th ser. 17 (1936-1937): 312-332. [* Subject heading: manuscript production *]

Benson, C. David, and Barry A. Windeatt. "The Manuscript Glosses to Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde." Chaucer Review 25 (1990-1991): 33-53. [The manuscript glosses help us to measure some aspects of fifteenth-century response to the work (their ideas of important passages, of structural divisions, etc.).] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology; marginalia *]

Blake, N[orman] F. "The Chaucer Canon: Methodological Assumptions." Neuphilologische Mitteilungen 90 (1989): 295-310. [Manuscripts and authorship attribution.] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; authors and authorship *]

Blake, N[orman] F. "The Relationship between the Hengwrt and the Ellesmere MSS of the 'Canterbury Tales.'" Essays and Studies 32 (1979): 1-18. [Aberystwyth, National Library of Wales, MS Peniarth 392D (Hengwrt MS 154); San Marino, CA, Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery, MS EL 26.C.9 (Ellesmere MS).] [* Subject heading: manuscript production *]

Bliss, A. J. "Notes on the Auchinleck Manuscript." Speculum 26 (1951): 652-658. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology; Auchinleck MS (Edinburgh, National Library of Scotland, Advocates MS 19.2.1) *]

Boffey, Julia. "French Lyrics and English Manuscripts: The Transmission of Some Poems in Trinity College, Cambridge, MS R.3.20, and British Library MS Harley 7333." Text 4 (1988): 135-146. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript culture (literary transmission) *]

Boffey, Julia. Manuscripts of English Courtly Love Lyrics in the Later Middle Ages. Manuscript Studies 1. Cambridge: D. S. Brewer / Boydell and Brewer, 1985. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript culture (literary transmission) *]

Bologna, Giulia. Illuminated Manuscripts: The Book before Gutenberg. Trans. Jay Hyams. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1988. [Includes a section on papyrology; includes sections on writing materials, tools, etc.; includes a list of the names (with short biographies) of known illuminators; includes a section of short descriptions of modern repositories. The bulk of the book, though, consists of 149 colour reproductions of MS pages in roughly chronological order. Trans. of Manoscritti e miniature (Milan: Fenice 2000 / Anaya Editoriale, 1988).] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; material production (paper, parchment, vellum); material production (writing implements); manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination) *]

Boyle, Leonard E. "The Nowell Codex and the Poem of Beowulf." In The Dating of Beowulf. Ed. Colin Chase. Toronto Old English Series 6. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1981. Pp. 21-32. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology; "Beowulf" manuscript (London, British Library MS Cotton Vitellius A.xv) *]

Bradley, John [William]. Illuminated Manuscripts. Little Books on Art. London: Methuen, 1905. [Rpt. London: Bracken, 1996.] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination) *]

Brook, G. L. "A Piece of Evidence for the Study of Middle English Spelling." Neuphilologische Mitteilungen 73 (1972): 25-28. [* Subject heading: manuscript production *]

Brown, Michelle P. Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts. London: British Library, 1991. [A short and general account of manuscripts from the early Middle Ages, using examples from the collections of the British Library.] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology; history of the book *]

Brown, Michelle P., and Scott McKendrick, eds. Illuminating the Book: Makers and Interpreters; Essays in Honour of Janet Backhouse. British Library Studies in Medieval Culture. London: British Library, 1998. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination) *]

Brownrigg, Linda L., ed. Making the Medieval Book: Techniques of Production. Los Altos Hill, CA: Anderson-Lovelace / Red Gull, 1995. [* Subject heading: manuscript production *]

Brownrigg, Linda L., ed. Medieval Book Production: Assessing the Evidence; Proceedings of the 2nd Conference of the Seminar in the History of the Book to 1500, Oxford, July 1988. Los Altos Hill, CA: Red Gull Press / Anderson-Lovelace, 1990. [Rev.: (Pamela Robinson) The Library, 6th ser. 16 (1994): 332-335.] [* Subject heading: manuscript production *]

Bruns, Gerald L. "The Originality of Texts in a Manuscript Culture." Comparative Literature 32 (1980): 113-129. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript culture (literary transmission); early modern manuscripts *]

Calkins, Robert G. Illuminated Books of the Middle Ages. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1983. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination) *]

Camille, Michael. Image on the Edge: The Margins of Medieval Art. Essays in Art and Culture. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1992. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination); marginalia *]

Clement, Richard W. "Codicology as an Introduction to Medieval Literature." In Teaching the Middle Ages II. Ed. Robert V. Graybill, John Hallwas, Judy Hample, Robert L. Kindrick, Robert E. Lovell. SMART: Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Teaching. Warrensburg: Central Missouri State University, 1985. Pp. 159-169. [Clement recommends an introduction to some aspects of codicology as an introduction to medieval literature especially to make vivid the cultural differences between our age and the Middle Ages. Clement discusses some of the aspects of codicology he introduces in his classes such as the origins of some terms like codex and liber; the early forms of codices in the Christian era; book construction techniques (such as the hair-to-flesh stacking of parchment sheets, methods of ruling, collation, the use of singletons, methods of trimming and binding, and various anomalies in these); scriptoria differences; the description of bindings [abstract by John Morris].] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; codicology *]

Clemoes, Peter. Liturgical Influence on Punctuation in Late Old English and Early Middle English Manuscripts. Occasional Papers 1. Cambridge: Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Department of Anglo-Saxon, 1952. [The system of "neums" used in medieval music manuscripts is not a system of musical notation as we know it. The marks do not provide precise details about pitch and duration but serve as reminders of how to sing pieces already committed to memory by the singers. The neums function like many medieval punctuation systems for works intended for oral reading where the reader is cued to raise or lower the pitch or pause for rhetorical effect [abstract by John Morris].] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; history of punctuation *]

Cockshaw, Pierre, et al., eds. Miscellanea Codicologica F. Masai Dicata, MCMLXXIX. Pubs. de Scriptorium 8. Ghent: Story-Scientia, 1979. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; codicology *]

De Hamel, Christopher. A History of Illuminated Manuscripts. Oxford: Phaidon, 1986. [Rev.: Speculum 65 (1990): 651-654.] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination) *]

De Hamel, Christopher. Scribes and Illuminators. Medieval Craftsmen. London: British Museum, 1992. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination) *]

De Hamel, Christopher. The British Library Guide to Manuscript Illumination: History and Techniques. The British Library Guides. London: British Library, 1998. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination) *]

Deanesly, M. "Vernacular Books in England in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries." Modern Language Review 15 (1920): 349-358. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Diringer, David. The Hand-Produced Book. New York: Philosophical Library, 1953. [* Subject heading: manuscript production *]

Doyle, A. I. "Book Production by the Monastic Orders in England (c. 1375-1530): Assessing the Evidence." In Medieval Book Production: Assessing the Evidence; Proceedings of the Second Conference of The Seminar in the History of the Book to 1500, Oxford, July 1988. Ed. Linda L. Brownrigg. Los Altos Hills, CA: Red Gull Press / Anderson-Lovelace, 1990. Pp. 1-19. [According to Brownrigg's Introduction, p. xii, Doyle's essay was originally planned as part of the volume Book Production and Publishing in Britain, 1375-1475, ed. Jeremy Griffiths and Derek Pearsall, Cambridge Studies in Publishing and Printing History (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989), "which explains its first limit of date."] [* Subject heading: manuscript production (monastic scriptoria) *]

Doyle, A. I. "The English Provincial Book Trade before Printing." In Six Centuries of the Provincial Book Trade in Britain. Ed. Peter Isaac. Winchester: St. Paul's Bibliographies, 1990. Pp. 13-29. ["The papers published in this volume were presented at the Eighth Seminar on the British Book Trade, Durham, July 1990, the silver jubilee of the History of the Book Trade in the North." A survey of what is known about provincial centres of manuscript production.] [* Subject heading: manuscript production *]

Doyle, A. I. "The Shaping of the Vernon and Simeon Manuscripts." In Chaucer and Middle English Studies in Honour of Rossell Hope Robbins. Ed. Beryl Rowland. London: George Allen and Unwin, 1974. Pp. 328-341. [Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Eng. poet. a.1 (Sum. Cat. 3938-3942) (Vernon MS); London, British Library, MS Addit. 22283 (Simeon MS).] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology *]

Doyle, A. I., Elizabeth Rainey, and D. B. Wilson. Manuscript to Print: Tradition and Innovation in the Renaissance Book. Durham University Library Guides, Special Series 1. Durham: Durham University Library, 1975. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; early printed books: production; incunabula; relation of manuscripts and books *]

Doyle, A. I., and M. B. Parkes. "The Production of Copies of the Canterbury Tales and the Confessio Amantis in the Early Fifteenth Century." In Medieval Scribes, Manuscripts and Libraries: Essays Presented to N. R. Ker. Ed. M. B. Parkes and Andrew G. Watson. London: Scolar Press, 1978. Pp. 163-210. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; Geoffrey Chaucer; John Gower *]

Edwards, A. S. G. "Beinecke MS 661 and Early Fifteenth-Century English Manuscript Production." Yale University Library Gazette 66 supp. (1991): 181-196. [New Haven, Yale University, Beinecke Library, MS 661.] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology *]

Fein, Susanna. "Roll or Codex? The Diptych Layout of Thomas of Hales' 'Love Rune.'" Trivium 31 (1999): 13-23. [Vol. 31 of Trivium is a special issue: "Sources, Exemplars, and Copy-Texts: Influence and Transmission; Essays from the Lampeter Conference of the Early Book Society, 1997," ed. William Marx.] [Re: Oxford, Jesus College MS 29.] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology; page layout and design (mise en page; mise en texte); ordinatio; Thomas of Hales, "Luve Ron" *]

Fisher, John H. "The Intended Illustrations in MS Corpus Christi 61 of Chaucer's Troylus and Criseyde." In Medieval Studies in Honor of Lillian Herlands Hornstein. Ed. Jess B. Bessinger, Jr., and Robert R. Raymo. New York: New York University Press, 1976. Pp. 111-119. [Cambridge, Corpus Christi College Library, MS 61.] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination); Geoffrey Chaucer (Troilus and Criseyde) *]

Galway, M. "The Troilus Frontispiece." Modern Language Review 44 (1949): 161-177. [Cambridge, Corpus Christi College Library, MS 61.] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination); Geoffrey Chaucer (Troilus and Criseyde) *]

Gameson, Richard, ed. The Early Medieval Bible: Its Production, Decoration and Use. Cambridge Studies in Palaeography and Codicology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination) *]

Greenberg, Cheryl. "John Shirley and the English Book Trade." The Library 6th ser. 4 (1982): 369-380. [* Subject heading: manuscript production *]

Griffiths, Jeremy, and Derek Pearsall, eds. Book Production and Publishing in Britain 1375-1475. Cambridge Studies in Publishing and Printing History. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989. [Contents: R. J. Lyall, "Materials: The Paper Revolution"; Kathleen L. Scott, "Design, Decoration, and Illustration"; Mirjam M. Foot, "English Decorated Bookbindings"; C. Paul Christianson, "Evidence for the Study of London's Late Medieval Manuscript-Book Trade"; A. I. Doyle, "Publication by Members of the Religious Orders"; Anne Hudson, "Lollard Book Production"; Andrew Wathey, "The Production of Books of Liturgical Polyphony"; Kate Harris, "Patrons, Buyers and Owners: The Evidence for Ownership, and the Rôle of Book Owners in Book Production and the Book Trade"; Carol Meale, "Patrons, Buyers and Owners: Book Production and Social Status"; R. J. Lyall, "Books and Book Owners in Fifteenth-Century Scotland"; A. S. G. Edwards and Derek Pearsall, "The Manuscripts of the Major English Poetic Texts"; Julia Boffey and John J. Thompson, "Anthologies and Miscellanies: Production and Choice of Texts"; Vincent Gillespie, "Vernacular Books of Religion"; Linda Ehrsam Voigts, "Scientific and Medical Books"; N. F. Blake, "Manuscript to Print."] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination); paleography (history of handwriting); material production (bookbinding, paper); reading and readers (patronage); libraries and repositories (historical); provenance; manuscript ownership and collecting; early printed books: production; incunabula; relation of manuscripts and books *]

Hanna, Ralph, III. "Miscellaneity and Vernacularity: Conditions of Literary Production in Late Medieval England." In The Whole Book: Cultural Perspectives on the Medieval Miscellany. Ed. Stephen G. Nichols and Siegfried Wenzel. Recentiores: Later Latin Texts and Contexts. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1996. Pp. 37-51. [* Subject heading: manuscript production *]

Hanna, Ralph, III. "The Production of Cambridge University Library MS Ff.i.6." Studies in Bibliography 40 (1987): 62-70. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology *]

Hellinga, Lotte. "The Codex in the Fifteenth Century: Manuscript and Print." In A Potencie of Life: Books in Society; The Clark Lectures 1986-1987. Ed. Nicolas Barker. London: British Library, 1993. Pp. 63-88. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; early printed books; incunabula *]

Hellinga, Lotte, and Hilton Kelliher. "The Malory Manuscript." British Library Journal 3 (1977): 91-113. [On the "Winchester manuscript" of Malory (now London, British Library MS Addit. 59678). The authors summarize the evidence that this is the manuscript that Caxton used; they then outline the history of the manuscript since that time.] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology; history of printing; early printed books: production; incunabula: copy-texts and exemplars; relation of manuscripts and books; manuscript ownership and collecting *]

Henderson, George. From Durrow to Kells: The Insular Gospel-books, 650-800. London: Thames and Hudson, 1987. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology; Anglo-Saxon period; Bible; Book of Kells (Dublin, Trinity College Library, MS 58); Book of Durrow (Dublin, Trinity College Library, MS 57) *]

Heyworth, P. L. "The Punctuation of Middle English Texts." In Medieval Studies for J. A. W. Bennett, Aetatis Suae LXX. Ed. P. L. Heyworth. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1981. Pp. 139-157. [Heyworth objects to the "bad inheritance" of modern editors in their punctuating of Middle English texts, for they punctuate almost exactly as did their immediate predecessors, and he objects to the lack of effort put into new editions to punctuate critically. He re-punctuates Usk's Testament of Love not only to make it flow smoothly, but also to make sense. Usk's work turns out to be better and more valuable than the "bad inheritance" of modern editors suggests. Heyworth also notes important shifts of signification when he re-punctuates Chaucer's Book of the Duchess, Troilus and Criseyde and the "Knight's Tale." Heyworth insists on the obligation of the modern editor to punctuate texts in modern style, but he also insists that it be done with a fresh critical eye with each new edition. He expresses horror at Manly and Rickert's unpunctuated Chaucer [abstract by John Morris].] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; history of punctuation *]

Hodapp, William F. "The Visual Presentation of Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde in Three Fifteenth-Century Manuscripts." Manuscripta 38 (1994): 237-252. [Hodapp considers the visual aspects (layout, decoration, illumination) of three manuscripts (each of them published in the Pilgrim Books series of Chaucer facsimiles): Cambridge, Corpus Christi College, MS 61; Cambridge, St. John's College, MS L.1; New York, Pierpont Morgan Library, MS M.817.] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination); page layout and design (mise en page; mise en texte); ordinatio; Geoffrey Chaucer *]

Howard-Hill, T. H. "'Nor stage, nor stationers stall can showe': The Circulation of Plays in Manuscript in the Early Seventeenth Century." Book History 2 (1999): 28-41. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; scribes and scribal practices; manuscript culture (literary transmission); early modern manuscripts *]

Jenkinson, H[ilary], (Sir). "Notes on the Study of English Punctuation of the Sixteenth Century." Review of English Studies 2 (1926): 152-158. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; history of punctuation *]

Kenyon, F. Books and Readers in Ancient Rome. 2nd ed. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1951. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Ker, Neil R. English Manuscripts in the Century after the Norman Conquest. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1960. [* Subject heading: manuscript production *]

Kiernan, Kevin S. "Digital Image Processing and the Beowulf Manuscript." Literary and Linguistic Computing 6 (1991): 20-27. [L&LC 6.1 is a Special Issue on Computers and Medieval Studies, ed. Marilyn Deegan with Andrew Armour and Mark Infusino. Abstract: "Over the past dozen years forensic and medical applications of technology first developed to record and transmit pictures from outer space have changed the way we see things here on earth, including Old English manuscripts. With their talents combined, an electronic camera designed for use with documents and a digital computer can now frequently enhance the legibility of formerly obscure or even invisible texts. The computer first converts the analogue image, in this case a videotape, to a digital image by dividing it into a microscopic grid and numbering each part by its relative brightness. Specific image processing programs can then radically improve the contrast, for example by stretching the range of brightness throughout the grid from black to white, emphasizing edges, and suppressing random background noise that comes from the equipment rather than the document. Applied to some of the most illegible passages in the Beowulf manuscript, this new technology indeed shows us some things we had not seen before and forces us to reconsider some established readings."] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; uses of computers; "Beowulf" manuscript (London, British Library MS Cotton Vitellius A.xv) *]

Kiernan, Kevin S. Beowulf and the Beowulf Manuscript. 2nd ed. Foreward by Katherine O'Brien O'Keeffe. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1996. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; Anglo-Saxon period; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology; "Beowulf" manuscript (London, British Library MS Cotton Vitellius A.xv) *]

Loomis, Laura Hibbard. "Chaucer and the Auchinleck MS: 'Thopas' and 'Guy of Warwick.'" In Essays and Studies in Honor of Carleton Brown. New York: New York University Press, 1940. Pp. 111-128. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; Geoffrey Chaucer; reading and readers; Auchinleck MS (Edinburgh, National Library of Scotland, Advocates MS 19.2.1) *]

Loomis, Laura Hibbard. "Chaucer and the Breton Lays of the Auchinleck MS." Studies in Philology 38 (1941): 14-33. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; Geoffrey Chaucer; reading and readers; Auchinleck MS (Edinburgh, National Library of Scotland, Advocates MS 19.2.1) *]

Loomis, Laura Hibbard. "The Auchinleck MS and a Possible London Bookshop of 1330-1340." PMLA 57 (1942): 595-628. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; Auchinleck MS (Edinburgh, National Library of Scotland, Advocates MS 19.2.1) *]

Love, Harold. Scribal Publication in Seventeenth-Century England. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993. [On manuscript production and dissemination in the seventeenth century. The paperback edition (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1998) changed the title: The Culture and Commerce of Texts: Scribal Publication in Seventeenth-Century England.] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript culture (literary transmission); early modern manuscripts *]

Manion, Margaret M., and Bernard J. Muir, eds. Medieval Texts and Images: Studies of Manuscripts from the Middle Ages. Chur, Reading, Paris, Philadelphia, Tokyo, and Melbourne: Harwood Academic Publishers; Sydney: Craftsman House, 1991. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination); manuscript culture (literary transmission) *]

Marotti, Arthur F. Manuscript, Print, and the English Renaissance Lyric. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1995. ["In this historical and cultural study of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century lyric poetry, Marotti examines the interrelationship between systems of literary transmission and shows how in England manuscript and print publication together shaped the emerging institution of literature."] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript culture (literary transmission); early modern manuscripts; early printed books *]

Martin, Henri-Jean, and Jean Vezin, eds. Mise en page et mise en texte du livre manuscrit. Paris: Cercle de la Librarie / Promodis, 1991. [Page layout in medieval and later manuscripts.] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; page layout and design; ordinatio *]

Minnis, A. J., ed. Latin and Vernacular: Studies in Late-Medieval Texts and Manuscripts. York Manuscripts Conference, Proceedings 1. Cambridge: D. S. Brewer / Boydell and Brewer, 1989. [* Subject heading: manuscript production *]

Monks, Peter Rolfe, and D. D. R. Owen, eds. Medieval Codicology, Iconography, Literature and Translation: Studies for Keith Val Sinclair. Litterae Textuales. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1994. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination); manuscript culture (literary transmission) *]

Nichols, Stephen G., and Siegfried Wenzel, eds. The Whole Book: Cultural Perspectives on the Medieval Miscellany. Recentiores: Later Latin Texts and Contexts. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1996. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; compilations *]

Nordenfalk, Carl. Color of the Middle Ages: A Survey of Book Illumination based on Color Facsimiles of Medieval Manuscripts. Pittsburgh: University Art Gallery, 1976. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination) *]

Parkes, M. B. "Punctuation, or Pause and Effect." In Medieval Eloquence: Studies in the Theory and Practice of Medieval Rhetoric. Ed. James J. Murphy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1978. Pp. 127-142. [There are several historical styles of punctuation in the Middle Ages which succeed each other as previous styles fall into disuse. Sometimes punctuation is used to clarify the littera or proper arrangement of words, the sensus or literal meaning, or the sententia or deeper meaning. These terms also become interchanged at different times. Punctuation was also sometimes used as enunciation cues for oratory. Hugh of St. Victor and William of Conches favoured punctuation to reveal the sententia, as did Roger Bacon who wrote as the sententia system was falling into disuse in the 13th century. Nicholas of Lyra, however, favoured a system that made the sensus clear, while Bonus of Florence ridiculed pronuntiatio systems [abstract by John Morris].] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; history of punctuation *]

Parkes, M. B. "The Influence of the Concepts of Ordinatio and Compilatio on the Development of the Book." In Medieval Learning and Literature: Essays Presented to Richard William Hunt. Ed. J. J. G. Alexander and M. T. Gibson. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1976. Pp. 115-141. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; compilations; ordinatio *]

Parkes, M. B. Pause and Effect: An Introduction to the History of Punctuation in the West. Aldershot, Hants.: Scolar Press, 1992. [Rev.: (A. S. G. Edwards) Medium Ævum 63 (1994): 118-119; (Derek Pearsall) Medievalia et Humanistica ns 21 (1994): 191-194; (Carol Percy) Modern Philology 93 (1995-1996): 275-279.] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; history of punctuation *]

Putnam, George H. Books and their Makers during the Middle Ages: A Study of the Conditions of the Production and Distribution of Literature from the Fall of the Roman Empire to the Close of the Seventeenth Century. 2 vols. New York: G. P. Putnam's, 1896-1897. [Rpt. New York: Hilary House Publishers, 1962.] [* Subject heading: manuscript production *]

Ramsey, R[oy] V[ance]. "The Hengwrt and Ellesmere Manuscripts of the Canterbury Tales: Different Scribes." Studies in Bibliography 35 (1982): 133-154. [Aberystwyth, National Library of Wales, MS Peniarth 392D (Hengwrt MS 154); San Marino, CA, Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery, MS EL 26.C.9 (Ellesmere MS).] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; Geoffrey Chaucer; scribes and scribal practices *]

Richards, Mary P., ed. Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts: Basic Readings. Garland Reference Library of the Humanities 1434; Basic Readings on Anglo-Saxon England 2. New York and London: Garland Publishing, 1993. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; Anglo-Saxon period *]

Robinson, Ian. "Manuscript Punctuation." Chap. 7 of Chaucer's Prosody: A Study of the Middle English Verse Tradition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1971. Pp. 132-147. [Describes the manuscript punctuation of late Middle English prose and poetry and argues that fifteenth-century manuscript punctuation is a better guide to correct reading of Chaucer than is the modern punctuation added by modern editors.] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; history of punctuation *]

Robinson, Pamela R. "The 'Booklet': A Self-Contained Unit in Composite Manuscripts." Codicologica 3 (1980): 46-69. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology; compilations *]

Rouse, R[ichard] H., and M[ary] A. Rouse. "The Commercial Production of Manuscript Books in Late-Thirteenth- and Early-Fourteenth-Century Paris." In A Potencie of Life: Books in Society; The Clark Lectures, 1986-1987. Ed. Nicolas Barker. The British Library Studies in the History of the Book. London: British Library, 1993. Pp. 45-61. [As a result of a new tax imposed in the 1290s, there are preserved for six years in that decade the names and street locations of Paris merchants; the Rouses have surveyed these tax rolls for the evidence of the practices of booksellers. Among other things, the Rouses are interested in evidence of collaborations between supposedly "competing" firms: in order to meet deadlines, a bookseller would subcontract some part of a job to a neighbouring firm, possibly in expectation that this neighbour would send a little business back on some other occasion (54). There were two neighbourhoods in which booksellers were frequent: on the Left Bank to serve the university community, and a street on the Isle in front of Notre Dame Cathedral (there was on the Right Bank only one libraire, immediately adjacent to the Louvre "whence his principal business must have come" (47). Not the least remarkable feature of these lists of names is the indication of numbers of women active in the production and trade in books: women as co-owners of shops with their husbands (also mother and son teams), women as inheriting businesses upon a husband's death, women as taking oaths at the before the administrators of the University as illuminators, etc. There is also some evidence of women as consumers of books, and the last part of the article (pp. 56-58) consider the case of "Thomas de Maubeuge's most illustrious steady customer, . . . Mahaut, countess of Artois in her own right and countess of Burgundy by marriage (d. 1329)." We have an account of the books that she commissioned from Thomas (57-58): "Mahaut of Artois dispels some of our myths--about the vernacular book trade, and about the books sold to women of her class. She is not a demure lady who sits with her needlework and her lap dog, caressing her one pretty picture-book of prayers. For the most part, those of her books we have mentioned here are not at all 'coffee-table' books for display, with exquisite full-page illustration by the likes of Master Honoré or Jean Pucelle and with 'gold letters and little apes' (though indeed she had her [58] share of those). This is a vigorous, sometimes belligerent, woman of affairs who reads, really reads. She has the wit to know what she likes, the industry to search out where they may be found, and the money to commission copies for her use."] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; reading and readers (female, woman, women) *]

Salter, Elizabeth, and Derek Pearsall. "Pictorial Illustration of Late Medieval Poetic Texts: The Role of the Frontispiece or Prefatory Picture." In Medieval Iconography and Narrative: A Symposium. Ed. Flemming G. Andersen, et al. Odense: Odense University Press, 1980. Pp. 100-123. ["Proceedings of the fourth international symposium organized by the Centre for the Study of Vernacular Literature in the Middle Ages, held at Odense University on 19-20 November 1979."] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination) *]

Schramm, W. L. "The Cost of Books in Chaucer's Time." Modern Language Notes 48 (1933): 139-145. [* Subject heading: manuscript production; Geoffrey Chaucer *]

Sheppard, Jennifer M. The Buildwas Books: Book Production, Acquisition and Use at an English Cistercian Monastery, 1165-c.1400. Oxford: Oxford Bibliographical Society, 1997. [* Subject heading: manuscript production (monastic scriptoria); libraries and repositories (historical); Abbey of Buildwas *]

Southern, R. W. (Sir). "Language, Punctuation and Spelling." Part 2 of his Introduction to The Life of St Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury by Eadmer. Ed. and trans. R. W. Southern. Oxford Medieval Texts. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1972. Pp. xxv-xxxiv. [First published, 1962, in Nelson's Medieval Texts Series; 1972 reprint includes corrections. Southern discusses Eadmer's punctuation (which Southern's edition reproduces). This is also a useful general description of the punctuation of medieval manuscripts. Southern explains Eadmer's system of punctuation as consistent with the 12th-century practice of using neum-like marks to punctuate as an aid to oral delivery. He notes Eadmer's three marks which are used for medial stops, "rising voice" in the main sentence and as an indication of subordination [abstract by John Morris].] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; history of punctuation *]

Spector, Stephen. "The Composition and Development of an Eclectic Manuscript: Cotton Vespasian D VIII." Leeds Studies in English ns 9 (1976-1977): 62-83. [London, British Library, MS Cotton Vespasian D.viii (the "N-Town Plays").] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology; page layout and design; ordinatio *]

Stevens, Martin, and Daniel Woodward, eds. The Ellesmere Chaucer: Essays in Interpretation. San Marino, CA: Huntington Library, 1995. [San Marino, CA, Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery, MS EL .] [* Subject heading: manuscript production; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology; Geoffrey Chaucer *]



Bibliography: [ Some basic resources ] | [ General bibliography ] | [ History of the book ] | [ Literacy and education, medieval and early modern (readers and reading) ] | [ Archival research ] | [ Forgeries / bibliographic fraud ] | [ Dictionaries (historical) ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: production ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: catalogues ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: facsimiles ] | [ Diplomatics: the study of historical documents ] | [ Printing, history of ] | [ Publishing, history of ] | [ Libraries and repositories, history of; book collecting ] | [ Manuscript culture ] | [ Manuscript culture: patronage ] | [ Manuscripts: codicology ] | [ Manuscripts: paleography ] | [ Manuscript production ] | [ Manuscript production: scribes and scribal practices ] | [ Manuscript production: decoration and illustration ] | [ Manuscript production: material culture (paper, bindings, etc.) ] | [ Manuscripts: catalogues and finding aids ] | [ Manuscripts: facsimiles and facsimile editions ] | [ Sigillography (the study of seals) ] | [ Textual criticism and editing ] | [ Keyword search of entire bibliography ]


[Button: Back to Main page] [Button: Course Notes] [Button: People]
[Button: Bibliography] [Button: Links] [Button: Site Index]


© 1998 Stephen R. Reimer
English; University of Alberta; Edmonton, Canada
All rights reserved.
Created: 29 Oct. 1998; Last revised: 22 Feb. 2000

email: Stephen.Reimer@UAlberta.Ca
URL: http://www.ualberta.ca/~sreimer/ms-course.htm