[Image: Herebert page]

Manuscript Studies
Medieval and Early Modern

Bibliography: Manuscript Culture


You are here: > Main Page > Bibliography > Manuscript culture


Baswell, Christopher. "Multilingualism on the Page." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 38-50. [* Subject Heading: Manuscript culture; Middle English literature; multilingual manuscripts, scribes *]

Bourgain, Pascale, and Laura Light. Bestsellers. Primer 4. Paris and New York: Les Enluminures, 2014. [Publisher's description: A short illustrated pamphlet which "assembles a group of manuscripts that survive in many hundreds of copies to explore the idea of the medieval 'bestseller.' Medieval 'bestsellers' were the texts considered truly important, and thus preferentially copied, during the Middle Ages. The texts in this collection include some that are still read today, alongside others, of equal significance, that are hardly known even to scholars and almost certainly seldom read."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; types of manuscripts; frequently copied works *]

Boyle. Leonard E. Integral Palaeography. Intro. F. Troncarelli. Textes et études du moyen âge 16. Turnhout: Brepols, 2001. [A collection of Father Boyle's articles on manuscripts and palaeography.] [Contents: Manuscripts and incunabula in the Library of San Clemente, Rome -- The emergence of Gothic handwriting, in the year 1200 -- Optimist and recensionist: 'common errors' or 'common variations'? -- Peciae, apopeciae, and a Toronto manuscript of the 'Sententie libri ethicorum' of Aquinas -- Pecia, apopeciae, epipecia -- 'Epistulae venerunt parum dulces': la place de la codicologie dans l'édition des textes latins médiévaux -- Tonic accent, codicology and literacy -- The ways of prayer of St. Dominic -- The 'Basilicanus' of Hilary revisited -- The Nowell Codex and the poem of Beowulf -- The 'Breviary of St. Dominic' -- The friars and reading in public.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; scribes and scribal practices; paleography; codicology *]

Brantley, Jessica. "Vision, Image, Text." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 315-334. [* Subject Heading: Manuscript culture; Middle English literature *]

Brown, George Hardin, and Linda Ehrsam Voigts, eds. The Study of Medieval Manuscripts of England: Festschrift in Honor of Richard W. Pfaff. Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies 384; Arizona Studies in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance 35. Tempe, AZ, and Turnhout, Belgium: ACMRS (Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies), in collaboration with Brepols, 2010. [A collection of sixteen studies of manuscripts produced in medieval England.] [Contents: Rebellion and perseverance: the profession of lay brothers in the Order of Sempringham and the votive mass for conversi / Janet Sorrentino -- A lost treatise by Amalarius: new evidence from the twelfth century / Christopher A. Jones -- Pembroke College 302: abbreviated Gospel book or Gospel lectionary? / Elizabeth C. Teviotdale -- Page design for the Becket vigil: making something out of nothing / Andrew Hughes -- The role of Old Sarum in the processions of Salisbury Cathedral / William Peter Mahrt -- The sanctorals of early Sarum missals and breviaries, c. 1250-c.1350 / Nigel Morgan -- Unexpected texts for saints in some Sarum breviary manuscripts / Sherry Reames -- Priests and pastoral care in early Anglo-Saxon England / Alan Thacker -- The Wilfridian annals in Winchester Cathedral Library MS 1 and Durham Cathedral Library MS B. ii. / Joshua A. Westgard -- The old English Boethius, the Latin commentaries, and Bede / Joseph Wittig -- The panorama of the crusades, 1096 to 1218, as seen in Yates Thompson MS 12 in the British Library / Jaroslav Folda -- William Reed, Bishop of Chichester (d. 1385), bibliophile / Rodney Thomson -- Who was Gilbert the Englishman? / Michael McVaugh -- The monks of Westminster and the peculium / Barbara F. Harvey -- Curiosities from a sermon book / Siegfried Wenzel -- Moral philosophy in England after Grosseteste: an "underground" history / Charles F. Briggs.] [* Subject heading: Manuscript Culture: medieval England *]

Brown, Michelle P. The Book and the Transformation of Britain, c.550-1050: A Study in Written and Visual Literacy and Orality. Sandars Lectures in Bibliography. London: British Library, 2011. [Contents: Introduction: What does 'literacy' mean in this period? -- Conversion: scribes, the sacred and social change -- Creating communities of reading -- Language, literature and libraries.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture: early Middle Ages; literacy and education, medieval and early modern; readers and reading; Old English literature; Anglo-Saxon period; illustration (illumination) of books and manuscripts *]

Brown, Michelle P. The Lindisfarne Gospels: Society, Spirituality, and the Scribe. The British Library Studies in Medieval Culture. London: British Library, 2003. [Publisher's description: "The questions of where and when the Lindisfarne Gospels were made are addressed, but just as importantly the 'why' is explored, in the context of new research concerning the technical innovation of its maker, his spiritual motivation and the needs of the society in which he worked."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; codicology; paleography (history of handwriting); Lindisfarne Gospels (London, British Library, Cotton MS Nero D.iv); early medieval England: Northumbria; Anglo-Saxon period; illuminated manuscripts *]

Brown, Michelle P. The Lindisfarne Gospels and the Early Medieval World. London: British Library, 2011. [Subject heading: manuscript culture; Lindisfarne Gospels (London, British Library, Cotton MS Nero D.iv); early medieval England: Northumbria; Anglo-Saxon period; illuminated manuscripts *]

Brown, Michelle P. Manuscripts from the Anglo-Saxon Age. 2nd ed. London: British Library; Toronto and Buffalo: University of Toronto Press, 2007. [Publisher's description: "Anglo-Saxon England was one of the most sophisticated states in the medieval West, renowned for its ecclesiastical and cultural achievements. The written word was of tremendous importance in this transformation. Within in a century of the introduction of Christianity and literacy, the book had become a central element of Anglo-Saxon society, and a rich vehicle for cultural and artistic expression. This new book by a leading expert on the period, Michelle P. Brown, provides an authoritative introduction to the art of book production in the Anglo-Saxon period and an historical overview of the period by means of its book culture. It illustrates in colour over 140 examples of the finest Anglo-Saxon books, from the British Library and other major collections."] [Contents: The Insular World: Celts, Britons and Anglo-Saxons -- Southumbria: the Rise of Mercia and Wessex -- Shaping England: from Alfred to Ælfric -- The second Viking Age: Cnut to the Conquest.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture: early Middle Ages; manuscript production; illumination of books and manuscripts; Old English manuscripts; Anglo-Saxon period *]

Brown, Michelle P. Painted Labyrinth: The World of the Lindisfarne Gospels. London: British Library, 2003. [Publisher's description: "The Lindisfarne Gospels is one of the world's greatest works of art in book form. It is an 8th-century Latin Gospelbook, with a 10th-century gloss, which is the earliest surviving translation of the Gospels into the English language. Its maker was one of the greatest artists of the Anglo-Saxon and Celtic worlds, receptive to new influences and prepared to experiment with new techniques. The book is thought to have been made around 715-720 in the island monastery of Lindisfarne (Holy Island) in the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Northumbria in north-eastern England. It is without doubt one of the great landmarks of human cultural achievement: the attempt of a gifted individual to express a whole society's identity and belief with an energy and passion that still inspire. Painted Labyrinth is a general introduction to the background and history of this breathtaking artwork and symbol of Christian faith. Highly illustrated and very readable, the book is divided into short sections, each examining an aspect of the Anglo-Saxon world, the heritage of the people who lived and ruled at this time, and how and why this great book was created."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; Lindisfarne Gospels (London, British Library, Cotton MS Nero D.iv); early medieval England: Northumbria; Anglo-Saxon period; illuminated manuscripts; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination) *]

Brown, Michelle P. Understanding Illuminated Manuscripts: A Guide to Technical Terms. "Looking at" Series: Getty Trust Publications, J. Paul Getty Museum. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (glossaries); manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination) *]

Caillet, Jean-Pierre, and Marie-Pierre Laffitte, eds. Les manuscrits carolingiens: Actes du colloque de Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, le 4 mai 2007. Bibliologia 27. Turnhout: Brepols, 2009. [Papers presented at a colloquium held in conjunction with the exhibition "Trésors carolingiens," which was on display at the Bibliothèque nationale in Paris from Mar. 2 to June 24, 2007.] [Contents: Caractères et statut du livre d'apparat carolingien: origines et affirmation / Jean-Pierre Caillet -- Les Évangiles de Saint-Denis et l'influence de l'école de la cour de Charlemagne sur les scriptoria de Francie occidentale / Fabrizio Crivello -- Entre imitation et invention: un livre d'Évangiles de style tourangeau (Paris, BnF, ms. latin 269) / Charlotte Denoël -- Jerome and Vergil in Carolingian frontispieces and the uses of translation / Herbert L. Kessler -- Le redécouverte des manuscrits carolingiens par les érudits et les collectionneurs français (VXIe-XVIIIe siècles) / Marie-Pierre Laffitte -- Early Carolingian manuscripts and ivories / Lawrence Nees -- La visibilité de Dieu dans les Bibles carolingiennes / Anne-Orange Poilpré -- Étude technique sur les décors de manuscrits carolingiennes / Patrica Roger -- Le renouvellement des études scientifiques autour des manuscrits carolingiens: de Léopold Delisle à Bernhard Bischoff / Jean Vezin.] [* Subject heading: Manuscript Culture: medieval; northern Europe: Carolingian period *]

Chaytor, H. J. From Script to Print: An Introduction to Medieval Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1945. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); early printed books: production; incunabula; relation of manuscripts and books *]

Coleman, Joyce. "Aurality." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 68-85. [* Subject Heading: Manuscript culture; Middle Ages; Middle English literature *]

Connolly, Margaret, and Raluca Radulescu, eds. Insular Books: Vernacular Manuscript Miscellanies in Late Medieval Britain. Proceedings of the British Academy 201. Oxford: Oxford University Press, for the British Academy, 2015. [Publisher's description: "Medieval miscellanies are multi-text manuscripts, made up of varied contents, often in a mixture of languages. They might be the work of one compiler or several, and might have been put together over a short period of time or over many years (even over several generations). Such mixed manuscripts are much more common that we might imagine and indeed are a typical environment for the survival of medieval texts. . . . The essays in this volume discuss a great number of manuscript miscellanies produced in Britain in the 14th, 15th, and 16th centuries. Some of the essays offer new insights into very well-known miscellanies, whilst others draw attention to little-known volumes. Whilst previous studies of the miscellany have restricted themselves to disciplinary or linguistic boundaries, this collection uniquely draws on the expertise of specialists in the rich range of vernacular languages used in Britain in the later Middle Ages (Anglo-French, Middle English, Older Scots, Middle Welsh). As a result it has been possible to draw illuminating comparisons between miscellany manuscripts that were the products of different geographical areas and cultures. Collectively the essays in Insular Books explore the wide range of heterogeneous manuscripts that may be defined as miscellanies, and model approaches to their study that will permit a deeper and more nuanced understanding of the production of these assemblages, as well as their circulation and reception in their own age and beyond."] [Contents: Introduction / Margaret Connolly and Raluca Radulescu -- Texts in Conversation: Charlemagne Epics and Romances in Insular Plural-Text Codices / Marianne Ailes and Phillipa Hardman -- Multilingualism, the Harley Scribe, and Johannes Jacobi / Keith Busby -- Literary Scribes: The Harley Scribe and Robert Thornton as Case Studies / Susanna Fein -- The Organisation of Multilingual Miscellanies: the Contrasting Fortunes of Middle English Lyrics and Romances / Ad Putter -- John Northwood's Miscellany Revisited / Wendy Scase -- Vying for Attention: the Contents of Trinity College Dublin MS 432 / Raluca Radulescu -- The Chivalric Miscellany: Classifying John Paston's 'Grete Boke' / Andrew Taylor -- Amateur Book Production and the Miscellany in Late-Medieval East Anglia: Tanner 407 and Beinecke 365 / Carol Meale -- Writing Without Borders: Multilingual Content in Welsh Miscellanies from Wales, the Marches and Beyond / Ceridwen Lloyd-Morgan -- Welsh Bardic Miscellanies / Dafydd Johnston -- Lancelot of the Laik and the Literary Manuscript Miscellany in Fifteenth- and Sixteenth-Century Scotland / Emily Wingfield -- Entertainment Networks, Reading Communities, and the Early Tudor Anthology: Bodliean Library, MS Rawlinson C. 813 / Deborah Youngs -- Aberystwyth, National Library of Wales, MS Peniarth 12: The Development of a Bilingual Miscellany - Welsh and English / William Marx -- Towards a Taxonomy of Middle English Manuscript Assemblages / Julia Boffey and A. S. G. Edwards -- The Whole Book and the Whole Picture: Editions and Facsimiles of Medieval Miscellanies and their Influence / Margaret Connolly -- Afterword / Ardis Butterfield.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; manuscript miscellanies, medieval and early modern (nature, types); medieval audience; social context *]

Crosby, Everett U., C. Julian Bishko, Robert L. Kellogg, eds. Medieval Studies: A Bibliographical Guide. Garland Reference Library of the Humanities 427. New York and London: Garland Publishing, 1983. [Includes sections on Manuscripts, the Illumination of Manuscripts, Paleography, and Medieval Libraries, among many other interesting subjects.] [* Subject heading: manuscript studies (bibliographies) *]

D'Amico, John F. "Manuscripts." In The Cambridge History of Renaissance Philosophy. Ed. Charles B. Schmitt, Quentin Skinner, Eckhard Kessler, and Jill Kraye. Cambridge, New York, New Rochelle, Melbourne, and Sydney: Cambridge University Press, 1988. Pp. 11-24. ["A comprehensive history of the role played by manuscripts in Renaissance thought is yet to be written. . . ."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); early modern manuscripts *]

Dagenais, John. The Ethics of Reading in Manuscript Culture: Glossing the "Libro de buen amor." Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1994. ["Reexamining the roles played by author, reader, scribe, and text in medieval literary practice, John Dagenais argues that the entire physical manuscript must be the basis of any discussion of how meaning was made. Medievalists, he maintains, have relied too heavily on critical editions that seek to create a single, definitive text reflecting an author's intentions. In reality, manuscripts bear not only authorial texts but also a variety of elements added by scribes and readers. Using the surviving manuscripts of the fourteenth-century Libro de buen amor, Dagenais shows how consideration of the physical manuscripts and their cultural context can shed new light on interpretive issues that have puzzled modern readers" [publisher's summary].] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; authors and authorship; reading and readers *]

Donaldson, E. Talbot. "The Manuscripts of Chaucer's Works and their Use." In Geoffrey Chaucer: Writers and their Background. Ed. D. S. Brewer. London: G. Bell and Sons, 1974. Pp. 85-108. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Dwyer, R. A. "The Appreciation of Handmade Literature." Chaucer Review 8 (1974): 221-240. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Farr, Carol Ann. The Book of Kells: Its Function and Audience. British Library Studies in Medieval Culture 4. London: British Library, 1997. [Dublin, Trinity College Library, MS 58.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Fox, Peter, ed. The Book of Kells: MS 58, Trinity College Library, Dublin: Commentary. Lucerne: Faksimile Verlag Luzern, 1990. [Dublin, Trinity College Library, MS 58.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Gellrich, Jesse M. The Idea of the Book in the Middle Ages: Language Theory, Mythology, and Fiction. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1985. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); reading and readers *]

Gerritsen, Johan. "Have with You to Lexington! The Beowulf Manuscript and Beowulf." In In Other Words: Transcultural Studies in Philology, Translation, and Lexicology Presented to Hans Heinrich Meier on the Occasion of His Sixty-Fifth Birthday. Ed. J. Lachlan Mackenzie and Richard Todd. Dordrecht: Foris, 1989. Pp. 15-34. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; "Beowulf" manuscript (London, British Library MS Cotton Vitellius A.xv) *]

Gillespie, Alexandra. "Books." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 86-103. [* Subject Heading: Manuscript culture; Middle English literature *]

Green, Richard Firth. Poets and Princepleasers: Literature and the English Court in the Late Middle Ages. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1980. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); reading and readers *]

Hall, Thomas N., and Donald Scragg, eds. Anglo-Saxon Books and Their Readers: Essays in Celebration of Helmut Gneuss's "Handlist of Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts." Publication of the Richard Rawlinson Center. Kalamazoo, MI: Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, 2008. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; Old English manuscripts; Anglo-Saxon period; readers and reading *]

Hand, Joni M. Women, Manuscripts, and Identity in Northern Europe, 1350-1550. Farnham, Surrey, and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2013. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; northern Europe; art patronage (female); education and literacy: late medieval and early modern; women; gender studies *]

Hanna, Ralph, III. Pursuing History: Middle English Manuscripts and Their Texts. Figurae: Reading Medieval Culture. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1995. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Harrington, John Henry. "The Production and Distribution of Books in Western Europe to the Year 1500." D.L.S. Diss., New York, Columbia University, 1956. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Henderson, George. From Durrow to Kells: The Insular Gospel-Books, 650-800. London: Thames and Hudson, 1987. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture: early Middle Ages; Insular Gospels; Northumbrian Renaissance; Irish manuscripts; Old English manuscripts; Anglo-Saxon period *]

Hennessy, Marlene Villalobos, ed. Tributes to Kathleen L. Scott: English Medieval Manuscripts and their Readers. Tributes 4. Turnhout: Harvey Miller / Brepols, 2008. [Contents: Jonathan J. G. Alexander, "Two English Fifteenth-Century Manuscripts in the Biblioteca Estense with Illumination Attributable to the 'Caesar Master'"; Linda L. Brownrigg, "Bibliography of Kathleen L. Scott"; Christopher de Hamel, "The Baldry Pattern Book"; Lynda Dennison, "Penwork Decoration and its Significance in English Manuscripts of the Fourteenth Century"; A. I. Doyle, "Pen-Work Flourishing of Initials in England from c.1380"; A. S. G. Edwards, "Books Owned by Medieval Members of the Percy Family"; J. B. Friedman, "The Merda Philosophorum: An English Problem"; Phillipa Hardman, "The Mobile Page: 'Special Effects' in Some Late Medieval Manuscripts"; Marlene Villalobos Hennessy, "Introduction: A Tribute to Kathleen Scott from Her Friends"; George R. Keiser, "John Lydgate's Magnificat: Magnifying Scribal Difficulties"; Jeanne Krochalis, "The Newberry Library Stations of Rome Manuscript"; Ann Eljenholm Nichols, "'O Vernicle': Illustrations of an Arma Christi Poem"; Michael T. Orr, "Hierarchies of Decoration in Early Fifteenth-Century English Books of Hours"; Derek Pearsall, "Beyond Fidelity: The Illustration of Late Medieval Literary Texts"; P. R. Robinson, "'Lewdecalenders' from Lynn"; Lucy Freeman Sandler, "The Last Bohun Hours and Psalter"; Michael G. Sargent, "The Program of Illustration in National Library of Scotland, Advocates' Library MS 18.1.7 and Pierpont Morgan Library MS 648 of Nicholas Love's Mirror of the Blessed Life of Jesus Christ."] [* Subject Heading: Manuscript Culture; Middle Ages; England; illuminated manuscripts *]

Hindman, Sandra. Book of Hours: A Medieval Bestseller. Paris and New York: Les Enluminures, 2008. [Publisher's description: "This catalogue presents 25 books of hours with pictures and short descriptions. It also provides an informative tutorial that illustrates their structure section by section."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; catalogues and finding aids (thematic) *]

Holzknecht, Karl Julius. Literary Patronage in the Middle Ages. Philadelphia: Collegiate Press, 1923. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers (patronage) *]

Humphreys, Kenneth W. "Some Progress towards the History of the Manuscript Book and Its Users?" In Miscellanea Codicologica F. Masai Dicata, MCMLXXIX. Ed. Pierre Cockshaw, et al. Pubs. de Scriptorium 8. Ghent: Story-Scientia, 1979. Pp. 589-595. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; history of the book *]

Jordan, William Chester. "Western Medieval Manuscripts and Teaching at Princeton." Princeton University Library Chronicle 51 (1989): 26-30. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Kelliher, Hilton, and Sally Brown. English Literary Manuscripts. London: British Library, 1986. [A brief and popular introduction to some of the manuscripts (primarily of works in the traditional English literary canon) which are preserved in the British Library.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Kingshirn, William E., and Linda Safran. The Early Christian Book. Intro. Philip Rousseau. CUA Studies in Early Christianity. Washington, DC: Catholic Press of America, 2007. [Publisher's description: "From the very beginning Christianity was a religion of books--a lived, but also a written faith. The essays in this collection focus on the ways in which books were produced, used, treasured and conceptualized in the early Christian centuries (AD 100-600)."] [* Subject heading: history of the book (late antiquity and early Middle Ages); the Bible; literary transmission; reading and readers; reception history *]

L'Engle, Susan, and Ariane Bergeron-Foote. Law. Primer 3. Paris and New York: Les Enluminures, 2014. [Publisher's description: A short illustrated pamphlet which "provides an overview of one of the most complex genre of codices of the Middle Ages. The twelve manuscripts present a coherent collection tracking the development of western European law--civil and canon--from Justinian to the sixteenth century."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; types of manuscripts; legal manuscripts *]

Laistner, M. Thought and Letters in Western Europe, A.D. 500-900. 2nd ed. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1957. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Lerer, Seth, ed. Reading from the Margins: Textual Studies, Chaucer, and Medieval Literature. A special issue of Huntington Library Quarterly 58 (1996). [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; Ellesmere Manuscript of the Canterbury Tales (San Marino, Huntington Library, MS EL 26.C.9); Geoffrey Chaucer *]

Light, Laura. Sermons. Primer 1. Paris and New York: Les Enluminures, 2013. [Publisher's description: A short illustrated pamphlet which introduces the genre of sermon manuscripts.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; types of manuscripts; homiletic works *]

Light, Laura. Women and the Book in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Intro. Anne Winston-Allen. TextManuscripts 5. Paris and New York: Les Enluminures, 2015. [Publisher's description: "This catalogue showcases 36 manuscripts that demonstrate the important role that women played as authors, artists, scribes, patrons and book-owners throughout the Middle Ages and the Renaissance."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; catalogues and finding aids (thematic); reading and readers (female, woman, women); female patronage *]

Light, Laura, and Susan Boynton. Sacred Song: Chanting the Bible in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. TextManuscripts 4. Paris and New York: Les Enluminures, 2014. [Publisher's description: This catalogue "brings together thirty-two manuscripts from the fourteenth to the nineteenth centuries that represent different aspects of the chant tradition, as well as other forms of sacred music."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; catalogues and finding aids (thematic) *]

Lionarons, Joyce Tally, ed. Old English Literature in its Manuscript Context. Medieval European Studies 5. Morgantown: West Virginia University Press, 2004. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; paleography (history of handwriting); Old English manuscripts; Anglo-Saxon period *]

Mann, Jill, and Maura Nolan, eds. The Text in the Community: Essays on Medieval Works, Manuscripts, Authors, and Readers. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 2006. [* Subject heading: Manuscript Culture; literature; history and criticism; medieval manuscripts; social contexts *]

Meale, Carol M., and Derek Pearsall, eds. Makers and Users of Medieval Books: Essays in Honour of A. S. G. Edwards. Cambridge, and Rochester, NY: D. S. Brewer / Boydell and Brewer, 2014. [Publisher's description: "Late medieval manuscripts and early modern print history form the focus of this volume. It includes new work on the compilation of some important medieval manuscript miscellanies and major studies of merchant patronage and of a newly revealed woman patron, alongside explorations of medieval texts and the post-medieval reception history of Langland, Chaucer and Nicholas Love. It thus pays a fitting tribute to the career of Professor A. S. G. Edwards, highlighting his scholarly interests and demonstrating the influence of his achievements."] [* Subject Heading: Manuscript Culture; patrons and patronage; manuscripts; codicology and palaeography; book production in the Middle Ages *]

Morse, Charlotte Cook, Penelope Reed Doob, and Marjorie Curry Woods, eds. The Uses of Manuscripts in Literary Studies: Essays in Memory of Judson Boyce Allen. Studies in Medieval Culture 31. Kalamazoo: Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, 1992. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; archival research *]

Nix, Linda. "Early Medieval Book Design in England: The Influence of Manuscript Design on the Transmission of Texts." In A Millennium of the Book: Production, Design and Illustration in Manuscript and Print, 900-1900. Ed. Robin Myers, and Michael Harris. Publishing Pathways. Winchester: St Paul's Bibliographies; New Castle, DE: Oak Knoll Press, 1994. Pp. 1-21. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Ogilvy, Jack D. A. Books Known to Anglo-Latin Writers from Aldhelm to Alcuin (670-804). Mediaeval Academy of America, Studies and Documents 2. Cambridge, MA: Mediaeval Academy of America, 1936. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Ogilvy, Jack D. A. Books Known to the English, 597-1066. Cambridge, MA: Mediaeval Academy of America, 1967. [Rev. Helmut Gneuss, Anglia 89 (1971): 129-134; Gneuss considers the book unreliable.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Olson, Glending. Literature as Recreation in the Later Middle Ages. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1982. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); reading and readers *]

Owen-Crocker, Gale R., ed. Working with Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts. Exeter Medieval Texts and Studies. Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 2009. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; manuscripts (catalogues: thematic [English poetry]); Old English manuscripts; Anglo-Saxon period.*]

Parkes, M. B. Scribes, Scripts and Readers: Studies in the Communication, Presentation and Dissemination of Medieval Texts. London, and Rio Grande, OH: Hambledon Press, 1991. [A broad and general study of scribes, manuscript production, and literary transmission. The book includes some consideration (pp. 19-33) of the medieval development of abbreviations and shorthand notation.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); scribes and scribal practices; manuscript production; abbreviations (tachygraphy; Tironian notae [Tiro the scribe, notes], etc.); paleography (history of handwriting); reading and readers *]

Pearsall, Derek, ed. Manuscripts and Readers in Fifteenth-Century England. Cambridge: D. S. Brewer / Boydell and Brewer, 1983. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Pearsall, Derek. "Texts, Textual Criticism, and Fifteenth Century Manuscript Production." In Fifteenth-Century Studies: Recent Essays. Ed. Robert F. Yeager. Hamden, CT: Archon Books, 1984. Pp. 121-136. [On the importance to the student of literature of the study of manuscripts.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; textual criticism and editing *]

Pearsall, Derek. "The Uses of Manuscripts: Late Medieval English." Harvard Library Bulletin ns 4.4 (Winter 1993-1994): 30-36. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; archival research *]

Perry, Curtis, ed. Material Culture and Cultural Materialisms in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Arizona Studies in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance 5. Turnhout: Brepols Publishers, 2000. [* Subject heading: history of the book; manuscript culture; manuscript production *]

Powicke, (Sir) Frederick Maurice. The Medieval Books of Merton College. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1931. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); reading and readers; libraries and repositories (historical); provenance; manuscript ownership and collecting *]

Principe, Lawrence, and Laura Light. Alchemy. Primer 2. Paris and New York: Les Enluminures, 2013. [Publisher's description: A short illustrated pamphlet which "presents ten manuscripts from the collection of Joost R. Ritman in the Bibliotheca Philosophica Hermetica in Amsterdam. Professor Principe's contributions to this volume present a useful up-to-date guide to the often misunderstood subject and argue for the rightful position of alchemy in the development of modern science."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; types of manuscripts; alchemical works *]

Pulsiano, Phillip, and Elaine M. Treharne, eds. Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts and Their Heritage. Aldershot, Hants., and Brookfield, VT: Ashgate, 1998. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; scriptoria; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination); Old English manuscripts; Anglo-Saxon period *]

Reynolds, L. D., and N. G. Wilson. Scribes and Scholars: A Guide to the Transmission of Greek and Latin Literature. 3rd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; scribes and scribal practices *]

Richards, Mary P., ed. Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts: Basic Readings. Garland Reference Library of the Humanities 1434; Basic Readings on Anglo-Saxon England 2. New York and London: Garland Publishing, 1993; New York: Routledge, 2001. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture: early Middle Ages; reading and readers; Old English manuscripts; Anglo-Saxon period *]

Robbins, Rossell Hope. Introduction. Secular Lyrics of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries. Ed. Rossell Hope Robbins. 2nd ed. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1955. Pp. xvii-lv. [The Introduction is very useful on the history, types, and transmission of Middle English lyrics generally. On pp. xvii-xxx, Robbins describes in some detail ten broad types of manuscripts in which Middle English lyrics appear.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Robertson, Kellie. "Authorial Work." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 441-458. [Legal and moral discussions of work, working, labour, and their relationship to authorial "labour."] [* Subject Heading: Manuscript culture; Middle English literature; authors and authorship; writing as labour (work, working) *]

Root, Robert Kilburn. "Publication before Printing." PMLA 28 (1913): 417-431. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Rouse, Mary A., and Richard H. Rouse. Authentic Witnesses: Approaches to Medieval Texts and Manuscripts. Publications in Medieval Studies 27. Notre Dame, IN: The Medieval Institute, University of Notre Dame Press, 1991. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; libraries and repositories (historical); provenance *]

Rust, Martha Dana. Imaginary Worlds in Medieval Books: Exploring the Manuscript Matrix. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. [Publisher's description: "This book envisions the confines of medieval manuscripts as the potential territory of many virtual worlds: realms that readers call forth through their imaginative interactions with a book's material features."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; medieval books; manuscript production; reception history; reading and readers; Middle English; scribes and scribal practices *]

Scase, Wendy, ed. Essays in Manuscript Geography: Vernacular Manuscripts of the English West Midlands from the Conquest to the Sixteenth Century. Medieval Texts and Cultures of Northern Europe 10. Turnhout: Brepols, 2007. [Publisher's description: "The medieval English West Midlands has long been associated with the production of vernacular texts, in Old and Middle English, and with the making of several famous manuscripts. The aim of this volume is to re-think assumptions about medieval literature and the region in the light of new research in medieval book history."] [Contents: Bishops and their texts in the later eleventh century: Worcester and Exeter / Elaine Treharne -- Mobile libraries: Old English manuscript production in Worcester and the West Midlands, 1090-1215 / Mary Swan -- The pastoral context of the Trinity and Lambeth homilies / Bella Millett -- Compilation and purpose in MS Harley 2253 / Susanna Fein -- Oppositional thematics and metanarrative in MS Harley 2253, quires 1-6 / Carter Revard -- Mapping points west of West Midlands manuscripts and texts: Irishness(es) and Midle English literary culture / John J. Thompson -- The Clopton manuscript and the Beauchamp affinity: patronage and reception issues in a West Midlands reading community / Ryan Perry -- Inventing visual history: re-presenting the legends of Warwickshire / Martha W. Driver -- Owners and copyists of John Rous's armorial rolls / David Griffith -- The manuscripts of the West Midlands Catalogue Project / Rebecca Farnham -- Middle English romance and the West Midlands / Alison Wiggins -- Fingerprinting paper in West Midlands medieval manuscripts / Orietta Da Rold.] [* Subject Heading: Manuscript Culture; vernacular texts; Old English; Middle English *]

Schieberle, Misty. Feminized Counsel and the Literature of Advice in England. Disputatio 26. Turnhout: Brepols, 2014. [Publisher's description: "The term 'feminized counsel' denotes the advice associated with and spoken by women characters. This book demonstrates that rather than classify women's voices as an opposite against which to define masculine authority, late medieval vernacular poets embraced the feminine as a representation of their subordination to kings, patrons, and authorities. The works studied include Gower's Confessio Amantis, Chaucer's Legend of Good Women and Melibee, and English translations of Christine de Pizan's Epistre Othea. To advise readers, these texts draw on the politicized genre of mirrors for princes. Whereas Latin mirrors such as the Secretum secretorum and Giles of Rome's De regimine principum represented women as inferior, weak, and detrimental to masculine authority, these vernacular texts break traditional expectations and portray women as essential and authoritative political counsellors. By considering Latin and French sources, historical models of queens' intercessions, and literary models of authoritative female personifications, this study explores the woman counsellor as a literary topos that enabled poets to criticize, advise, and influence powerful readers. Feminized Counsel elucidates the manner in which vernacular poets concerned with issues of counsel, mercy, and power identified with fictional women's struggles to develop authority in the political sphere. These women counsellors become enabling models that paradoxically generate authority for poets who also lack access to traditionally recognized forms of intellectual or literary authority."] [* Subject Heading: manuscript culture; English poetry; Middle English literature; women in literature *]

Snijders, T. Manuscript Communication: Visual and Textual Mechanics of Communication in Hagiographical Texts from the Southern Low Countries, 900-1200. Utrecht Studies in Medieval Literacy 32. Turnhout: Brepols, 2015. ["[T]his book argues that the High Middle Ages witnessed a fundamental process of manuscript diversification and specialisation, which was at the basis of the thirteenth-century revolution in manuscript layout. . . ."] [* Subject heading: Manuscript culture; manuscript composition and layout *]

Steiner, Emily. "Authority." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 142-159. [* Subject Heading: Manuscript culture; Middle English literature *]

Symes, Carol. "Manuscript Matrix, Modern Canon." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 7-22. [* Subject Heading: Manuscript Culture; manuscript contexts of literary works; canon creation; transmission and reception of literary works; medieval *]

Taylor, Andrew. "The Myth of the Minstrel Manuscript." Speculum 66 (1991): 43-73. [Includes refs. to various lyric collections which include items by Lydgate and Chaucer, etc. The codicological category of "Minstrel Manuscript" has a long history (here traced) but remains dubious as a classification for existing manuscripts. Chansons de geste, Middle English romances, and Middle English lyrics are generally preserved in late manuscripts, intended for private libraries in an age of growing lay literacy. Even existing manuscripts which might have been owned by "minstrels" were probably not used by them on their travels but read at home. True minstrel copies of minstrel repertory pieces have probably not survived the hard treatment to which they would have been subjected.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology; libraries and repositories (historical); provenance; manuscript ownership and collecting *]

Toswell, M. J. The Anglo-Saxon Psalter. Medieval Church Studies 10. Turnhout: Brepols, 2014. [Publisher's description: "The first comprehensive analysis of the use of the psalms in Anglo-Saxon England, this book particularly addresses the manuscripts and texts in which the psalms appeared, and the use of those manuscripts and texts in Anglo-Saxon England and later. The psalms are at the heart of Christian devotion, in the Middle Ages and still today. Learned early and sung weekly by every medieval monastic and cleric, the psalms were the language Christ and his ancestor David used to speak to God. Powerful and plaintive, angry and anguished, laudatory and lamenting: the psalms expressed the feelings and thoughts of the individuals who devised them and those who sang them privately or publicly in Anglo-Saxon England many generations later. Psalters from Anglo-Saxon England are the largest surviving single group of manuscripts, and also form a very significant percentage of the fragments of manuscripts extant from the period. Psalters were central to the liturgy, particularly for the daily Office, and were the first schoolbooks for the learning of Latin and Christian doctrine. Moreover, from Anglo-Saxon England comes the earliest complex of vernacular psalter material, including glossed and bilingual psalters, complete psalter translations, and poems based on individual psalms and on psalmic structures. The lament psalms are remarkably similar to the Old English elegies in both form and imagery, and the freedom with which vernacular adaptors of the psalms went about their work in Anglo-Saxon England suggests an appropriation of the psalter not as the sacred and unchanging Word but as words that could be turned to use for meditation, study, reading, and private prayer. Worth investigation are both individual figures who used the psalms such as Bede, Alfred, and Ælfric, and also the unknown compilers and scribes who developed new layouts for psalter manuscripts and repurposed earlier or Continental manuscripts for use in Anglo-Saxon England. In Latin and in the vernacular, these codices were central to Anglo-Saxon spirituality, while some of them also continued to be used well into the later Middle Ages."] [Contents: Introduction: Roles and Functions of the Psalms in Anglo-Saxon England; 1. The Psalms in the Lives of Individuals in Anglo-Saxon England: Bede, Alfred, Ælfric; 2. Psalter Manuscripts in Conception and Use: Three Case Studies; 3. The Psalms in the Material Culture of Anglo-Saxon England; 4. The Bilingual Psalters; 5. The Psalms in Old English Texts: Allusion and Adaptation; 6. The Psalms in Old English Texts: Source and Structure; 7. Afterlife: An Anglo-Saxon Perspective on Some Anglo-Norman Psalters.] [* Subject Heading: Manuscript Culture; Anglo-Saxon England; psalters; medieval devotional literature *]

Trapp, J. B., ed. Manuscripts in the Fifty Years after the Invention of Printing: Some Papers Read at a Colloquium at the Warburg Institute on 12-13 March 1982. London: Warburg Institute, University of London, 1983. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); early printed books: production; incunabula; relation of manuscripts and books *]

Warren, Michelle R. "Translation." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 51-67. [* Subject Heading: Manuscript culture; Middle English literature *]

Wilson, R. M. The Lost Literature of Medieval England. London: Methuen, 1952. [An account, based on the study of references to books in wills and similar documents, of works which were known in the Middle Ages but of which there are no longer any known extant copies.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); reading and readers; libraries and repositories (historical); provenance; manuscript ownership and collecting *]



Bibliography: [ Some basic resources ] | [ General bibliography ] | [ History of the book ] | [ Literacy and education, medieval and early modern (readers and reading) ] | [ Archival research ] | [ Forgeries / bibliographic fraud ] | [ Dictionaries (historical) ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: Early Modern book culture ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: production ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: catalogues ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: facsimiles ] | [ Diplomatics: the study of historical documents ] | [ Printing, history of ] | [ Publishing, history of ] | [ Libraries and repositories, history of; book collecting ] | [ Manuscript culture ] | [ Manuscript culture: patronage ] | [ Manuscripts: codicology ] | [ Manuscripts: paleography ] | [ Manuscript production ] | [ Manuscript production: scribes and scribal practices ] | [ Manuscript production: decoration and illustration ] | [ Manuscript production: material culture (paper, bindings, etc.) ] | [ Manuscripts: catalogues and finding aids ] | [ Manuscripts: facsimiles and facsimile editions ] | [ Sigillography (the study of seals) ] | [ Textual criticism and editing ] | [ Keyword search of entire bibliography ]


[Button: Back to Main page] [Button: Course Notes] [Button: Bibliography] [Button: Site Index]


© 1998, 2015 Stephen R. Reimer
English; University of Alberta; Edmonton, Canada
All rights reserved.
Created: 29 Oct. 1998; Last revised: 28 July 2015

email: Stephen.Reimer@UAlberta.Ca
URL: http://www.ualberta.ca/~sreimer/ms-course.htm