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Manuscript Studies
Medieval and Early Modern

Bibliography: Manuscript Culture


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Baswell, Christopher. "Multilingualism on the Page." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 38-50. [* Subject Heading: Manuscript culture; Middle English literature; multilingual manuscripts, scribes *]

Brantley, Jessica. "Vision, Image, Text." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 315-334. [* Subject Heading: Manuscript culture; Middle English literature *]

Brown, Michelle P. The Lindisfarne Gospels and the Early Medieval World. London: British Library, 2011. [Subject Heading: Manuscript Culture; The Lindisfarne Gospels; Anglo-Saxon Northumbria; illuminated manuscripts; early medieval England *]

Brown, Michelle P. Understanding Illuminated Manuscripts: A Guide to Technical Terms. "Looking at" Series: Getty Trust Publications, J. Paul Getty Museum. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (glossaries); manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination) *]

Chaytor, H. J. From Script to Print: An Introduction to Medieval Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1945. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); early printed books: production; incunabula; relation of manuscripts and books *]

Coleman, Joyce. "Aurality." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 68-85. [* Subject Heading: Manuscript culture; Middle Ages; Middle English literature *]

Connolly, Margaret, and Raluca Radulescu, eds. Insular Books: Vernacular Manuscript Miscellanies in Late Medieval Britain. Proceedings of the British Academy 201. Oxford: Oxford University Press, for the British Academy, 2015. [* Subject heading: Manuscript culture; manuscript miscellanies, medieval and early modern (nature, types); medieval audience; social context *]

Crosby, Everett U., C. Julian Bishko, Robert L. Kellogg, eds. Medieval Studies: A Bibliographical Guide. Garland Reference Library of the Humanities 427. New York and London: Garland Publishing, 1983. [Includes sections on Manuscripts, the Illumination of Manuscripts, Paleography, and Medieval Libraries, among many other interesting subjects.] [* Subject heading: manuscript studies (bibliographies) *]

D'Amico, John F. "Manuscripts." In The Cambridge History of Renaissance Philosophy. Ed. Charles B. Schmitt, Quentin Skinner, Eckhard Kessler, and Jill Kraye. Cambridge, New York, New Rochelle, Melbourne, and Sydney: Cambridge University Press, 1988. Pp. 11-24. ["A comprehensive history of the role played by manuscripts in Renaissance thought is yet to be written. . . ."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); early modern manuscripts *]

Dagenais, John. The Ethics of Reading in Manuscript Culture: Glossing the "Libro de buen amor." Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1994. ["Reexamining the roles played by author, reader, scribe, and text in medieval literary practice, John Dagenais argues that the entire physical manuscript must be the basis of any discussion of how meaning was made. Medievalists, he maintains, have relied too heavily on critical editions that seek to create a single, definitive text reflecting an author's intentions. In reality, manuscripts bear not only authorial texts but also a variety of elements added by scribes and readers. Using the surviving manuscripts of the fourteenth-century Libro de buen amor, Dagenais shows how consideration of the physical manuscripts and their cultural context can shed new light on interpretive issues that have puzzled modern readers" [publisher's summary].] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; authors and authorship; reading and readers *]

Donaldson, E. Talbot. "The Manuscripts of Chaucer's Works and their Use." In Geoffrey Chaucer: Writers and their Background. Ed. D. S. Brewer. London: G. Bell and Sons, 1974. Pp. 85-108. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Dwyer, R. A. "The Appreciation of Handmade Literature." Chaucer Review 8 (1974): 221-240. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Farr, Carol Ann. The Book of Kells: Its Function and Audience. British Library Studies in Medieval Culture 4. London: British Library, 1997. [Dublin, Trinity College Library, MS 58.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Fox, Peter, ed. The Book of Kells: MS 58, Trinity College Library, Dublin: Commentary. Lucerne: Faksimile Verlag Luzern, 1990. [Dublin, Trinity College Library, MS 58.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Gellrich, Jesse M. The Idea of the Book in the Middle Ages: Language Theory, Mythology, and Fiction. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1985. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); reading and readers *]

Gerritsen, Johan. "Have with You to Lexington! The Beowulf Manuscript and Beowulf." In In Other Words: Transcultural Studies in Philology, Translation, and Lexicology Presented to Hans Heinrich Meier on the Occasion of His Sixty-Fifth Birthday. Ed. J. Lachlan Mackenzie and Richard Todd. Dordrecht: Foris, 1989. Pp. 15-34. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; "Beowulf" manuscript (London, British Library MS Cotton Vitellius A.xv) *]

Gillespie, Alexandra. "Books." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 86-103. [* Subject Heading: Manuscript culture; Middle English literature *]

Green, Richard Firth. Poets and Princepleasers: Literature and the English Court in the Late Middle Ages. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1980. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); reading and readers *]

Hanna, Ralph, III. Pursuing History: Middle English Manuscripts and Their Texts. Figurae: Reading Medieval Culture. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1995. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Harrington, John Henry. "The Production and Distribution of Books in Western Europe to the Year 1500." D.L.S. Diss., New York, Columbia University, 1956. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Hennessy, Marlene Villalobos, ed. Tributes to Kathleen L. Scott: English Medieval Manuscripts and their Readers. Tributes 4. Turnhout: Harvey Miller / Brepols, 2008. [Contents: Jonathan J. G. Alexander, "Two English Fifteenth-Century Manuscripts in the Biblioteca Estense with Illumination Attributable to the 'Caesar Master'"; Linda L. Brownrigg, "Bibliography of Kathleen L. Scott"; Christopher de Hamel, "The Baldry Pattern Book"; Lynda Dennison, "Penwork Decoration and its Significance in English Manuscripts of the Fourteenth Century"; A. I. Doyle, "Pen-Work Flourishing of Initials in England from c.1380"; A. S. G. Edwards, "Books Owned by Medieval Members of the Percy Family"; J. B. Friedman, "The Merda Philosophorum: An English Problem"; Phillipa Hardman, "The Mobile Page: 'Special Effects' in Some Late Medieval Manuscripts"; Marlene Villalobos Hennessy, "Introduction: A Tribute to Kathleen Scott from Her Friends"; George R. Keiser, "John Lydgate's Magnificat: Magnifying Scribal Difficulties"; Jeanne Krochalis, "The Newberry Library Stations of Rome Manuscript"; Ann Eljenholm Nichols, "'O Vernicle': Illustrations of an Arma Christi Poem"; Michael T. Orr, "Hierarchies of Decoration in Early Fifteenth-Century English Books of Hours"; Derek Pearsall, "Beyond Fidelity: The Illustration of Late Medieval Literary Texts"; P. R. Robinson, "'Lewdecalenders' from Lynn"; Lucy Freeman Sandler, "The Last Bohun Hours and Psalter"; Michael G. Sargent, "The Program of Illustration in National Library of Scotland, Advocates' Library MS 18.1.7 and Pierpont Morgan Library MS 648 of Nicholas Love's Mirror of the Blessed Life of Jesus Christ."] [* Subject Heading: Manuscript Culture; Middle Ages; England; illuminated manuscripts *]

Holzknecht, Karl Julius. Literary Patronage in the Middle Ages. Philadelphia: Collegiate Press, 1923. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers (patronage) *]

Humphreys, Kenneth W. "Some Progress towards the History of the Manuscript Book and Its Users?" In Miscellanea Codicologica F. Masai Dicata, MCMLXXIX. Ed. Pierre Cockshaw, et al. Pubs. de Scriptorium 8. Ghent: Story-Scientia, 1979. Pp. 589-595. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; history of the book *]

Jordan, William Chester. "Western Medieval Manuscripts and Teaching at Princeton." Princeton University Library Chronicle 51 (1989): 26-30. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Kelliher, Hilton, and Sally Brown. English Literary Manuscripts. London: British Library, 1986. [A brief and popular introduction to some of the manuscripts (primarily of works in the traditional English literary canon) which are preserved in the British Library.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Laistner, M. Thought and Letters in Western Europe, A.D. 500-900. 2nd ed. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1957. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Meale, Carol M., and Derek Pearsall, eds. Makers and Users of Medieval Books: Essays in Honour of A. S. G. Edwards. Cambridge, and Rochester, NY: D. S. Brewer / Boydell and Brewer, 2014. [Publisher's description: "Late medieval manuscripts and early modern print history form the focus of this volume. It includes new work on the compilation of some important medieval manuscript miscellanies and major studies of merchant patronage and of a newly revealed woman patron, alongside explorations of medieval texts and the post-medieval reception history of Langland, Chaucer and Nicholas Love. It thus pays a fitting tribute to the career of Professor A. S. G. Edwards, highlighting his scholarly interests and demonstrating the influence of his achievements."] [* Subject Heading: Manuscript Culture; patrons and patronage; manuscripts; codicology and palaeography; book production in the Middle Ages *]

Morse, Charlotte Cook, Penelope Reed Doob, and Marjorie Curry Woods, eds. The Uses of Manuscripts in Literary Studies: Essays in Memory of Judson Boyce Allen. Studies in Medieval Culture 31. Kalamazoo: Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, 1992. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; archival research *]

Nix, Linda. "Early Medieval Book Design in England: The Influence of Manuscript Design on the Transmission of Texts." In A Millennium of the Book: Production, Design and Illustration in Manuscript and Print, 900-1900. Ed. Robin Myers, and Michael Harris. Publishing Pathways. Winchester: St Paul's Bibliographies; New Castle, DE: Oak Knoll Press, 1994. Pp. 1-21. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Ogilvy, Jack D. A. Books Known to Anglo-Latin Writers from Aldhelm to Alcuin (670-804). Mediaeval Academy of America, Studies and Documents 2. Cambridge, MA: Mediaeval Academy of America, 1936. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Ogilvy, Jack D. A. Books Known to the English, 597-1066. Cambridge, MA: Mediaeval Academy of America, 1967. [Rev. Helmut Gneuss, Anglia 89 (1971): 129-134; Gneuss considers the book unreliable.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Olson, Glending. Literature as Recreation in the Later Middle Ages. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1982. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); reading and readers *]

Parkes, M. B. Scribes, Scripts and Readers: Studies in the Communication, Presentation and Dissemination of Medieval Texts. London: Hambledon Press, 1991. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; scribes and scribal practices; paleography (history of handwriting); reading and readers *]

Pearsall, Derek, ed. Manuscripts and Readers in Fifteenth-Century England. Cambridge: D. S. Brewer / Boydell and Brewer, 1983. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Pearsall, Derek. "Texts, Textual Criticism, and Fifteenth Century Manuscript Production." In Fifteenth-Century Studies: Recent Essays. Ed. Robert F. Yeager. Hamden, CT: Archon Books, 1984. Pp. 121-136. [On the importance to the student of literature of the study of manuscripts.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; textual criticism and editing *]

Pearsall, Derek. "The Uses of Manuscripts: Late Medieval English." Harvard Library Bulletin ns 4.4 (Winter 1993-1994): 30-36. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; archival research *]

Perry, Curtis, ed. Material Culture and Cultural Materialisms in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Arizona Studies in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance 5. Turnhout: Brepols Publishers, 2000. [* Subject heading: history of the book; manuscript culture; manuscript production *]

Powicke, (Sir) Frederick Maurice. The Medieval Books of Merton College. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1931. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); reading and readers; libraries and repositories (historical); provenance; manuscript ownership and collecting *]

Reynolds, L. D., and N. G. Wilson. Scribes and Scholars: A Guide to the Transmission of Greek and Latin Literature. 3rd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; scribes and scribal practices *]

Robbins, Rossell Hope. Introduction. Secular Lyrics of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries. Ed. Rossell Hope Robbins. 2nd ed. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1955. Pp. xvii-lv. [The Introduction is very useful on the history, types, and transmission of Middle English lyrics generally. On pp. xvii-xxx, Robbins describes in some detail ten broad types of manuscripts in which Middle English lyrics appear.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Robertson, Kellie. "Authorial Work." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 441-458. [Legal and moral discussions of work, working, labour, and their relationship to authorial "labour."] [* Subject Heading: Manuscript culture; Middle English literature; authors and authorship; writing as labour (work, working) *]

Root, Robert Kilburn. "Publication before Printing." PMLA 28 (1913): 417-431. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Rouse, Mary A., and Richard H. Rouse. Authentic Witnesses: Approaches to Medieval Texts and Manuscripts. Publications in Medieval Studies 27. Notre Dame, IN: The Medieval Institute, University of Notre Dame Press, 1991. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; libraries and repositories (historical); provenance *]

Scase, Wendy, ed. Essays in Manuscript Geography: Vernacular Manuscripts of the English West Midlands from the Conquest to the Sixteenth Century. Medieval Texts and Cultures of Northern Europe 10. Turnhout: Brepols, 2007. [Publisher's description: "The medieval English West Midlands has long been associated with the production of vernacular texts, in Old and Middle English, and with the making of several famous manuscripts. The aim of this volume is to re-think assumptions about medieval literature and the region in the light of new research in medieval book history."] [Contents: Bishops and their texts in the later eleventh century: Worcester and Exeter / Elaine Treharne -- Mobile libraries: Old English manuscript production in Worcester and the West Midlands, 1090-1215 / Mary Swan -- The pastoral context of the Trinity and Lambeth homilies / Bella Millett -- Compilation and purpose in MS Harley 2253 / Susanna Fein -- Oppositional thematics and metanarrative in MS Harley 2253, quires 1-6 / Carter Revard -- Mapping points west of West Midlands manuscripts and texts: Irishness(es) and Midle English literary culture / John J. Thompson -- The Clopton manuscript and the Beauchamp affinity: patronage and reception issues in a West Midlands reading community / Ryan Perry -- Inventing visual history: re-presenting the legends of Warwickshire / Martha W. Driver -- Owners and copyists of John Rous's armorial rolls / David Griffith -- The manuscripts of the West Midlands Catalogue Project / Rebecca Farnham -- Middle English romance and the West Midlands / Alison Wiggins -- Fingerprinting paper in West Midlands medieval manuscripts / Orietta Da Rold.] [* Subject Heading: Manuscript Culture; vernacular texts; Old English; Middle English *]

Schieberle, Misty. Feminized Counsel and the Literature of Advice in England. Disputatio 26. Turnhout: Brepols, 2014. [Publisher's description: "The term 'feminized counsel' denotes the advice associated with and spoken by women characters. This book demonstrates that rather than classify women's voices as an opposite against which to define masculine authority, late medieval vernacular poets embraced the feminine as a representation of their subordination to kings, patrons, and authorities. The works studied include Gower's Confessio Amantis, Chaucer's Legend of Good Women and Melibee, and English translations of Christine de Pizan's Epistre Othea. To advise readers, these texts draw on the politicized genre of mirrors for princes. Whereas Latin mirrors such as the Secretum secretorum and Giles of Rome's De regimine principum represented women as inferior, weak, and detrimental to masculine authority, these vernacular texts break traditional expectations and portray women as essential and authoritative political counsellors. By considering Latin and French sources, historical models of queens' intercessions, and literary models of authoritative female personifications, this study explores the woman counsellor as a literary topos that enabled poets to criticize, advise, and influence powerful readers. Feminized Counsel elucidates the manner in which vernacular poets concerned with issues of counsel, mercy, and power identified with fictional women's struggles to develop authority in the political sphere. These women counsellors become enabling models that paradoxically generate authority for poets who also lack access to traditionally recognized forms of intellectual or literary authority."] [* Subject Heading: manuscript culture; English poetry; Middle English literature; women in literature *]

Snijders, T. Manuscript Communication: Visual and Textual Mechanics of Communication in Hagiographical Texts from the Southern Low Countries, 900-1200. Utrecht Studies in Medieval Literacy 32. Turnhout: Brepols, 2015. ["[T]his book argues that the High Middle Ages witnessed a fundamental process of manuscript diversification and specialisation, which was at the basis of the thirteenth-century revolution in manuscript layout. . . ."] [* Subject heading: Manuscript culture; manuscript composition and layout *]

Steiner, Emily. "Authority." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 142-159. [* Subject Heading: Manuscript culture; Middle English literature *]

Symes, Carol. "Manuscript Matrix, Modern Canon." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 7-22. [* Subject Heading: Manuscript Culture; manuscript contexts of literary works; canon creation; transmission and reception of literary works; medieval *]

Taylor, Andrew. "The Myth of the Minstrel Manuscript." Speculum 66 (1991): 43-73. [Includes refs. to various lyric collections which include items by Lydgate and Chaucer, etc. The codicological category of "Minstrel Manuscript" has a long history (here traced) but remains dubious as a classification for existing manuscripts. Chansons de geste, Middle English romances, and Middle English lyrics are generally preserved in late manuscripts, intended for private libraries in an age of growing lay literacy. Even existing manuscripts which might have been owned by "minstrels" were probably not used by them on their travels but read at home. True minstrel copies of minstrel repertory pieces have probably not survived the hard treatment to which they would have been subjected.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology; libraries and repositories (historical); provenance; manuscript ownership and collecting *]

Toswell, M. J. The Anglo-Saxon Psalter. Medieval Church Studies 10. Turnhout: Brepols, 2014. [Publisher's description: "The first comprehensive analysis of the use of the psalms in Anglo-Saxon England, this book particularly addresses the manuscripts and texts in which the psalms appeared, and the use of those manuscripts and texts in Anglo-Saxon England and later. The psalms are at the heart of Christian devotion, in the Middle Ages and still today. Learned early and sung weekly by every medieval monastic and cleric, the psalms were the language Christ and his ancestor David used to speak to God. Powerful and plaintive, angry and anguished, laudatory and lamenting: the psalms expressed the feelings and thoughts of the individuals who devised them and those who sang them privately or publicly in Anglo-Saxon England many generations later. Psalters from Anglo-Saxon England are the largest surviving single group of manuscripts, and also form a very significant percentage of the fragments of manuscripts extant from the period. Psalters were central to the liturgy, particularly for the daily Office, and were the first schoolbooks for the learning of Latin and Christian doctrine. Moreover, from Anglo-Saxon England comes the earliest complex of vernacular psalter material, including glossed and bilingual psalters, complete psalter translations, and poems based on individual psalms and on psalmic structures. The lament psalms are remarkably similar to the Old English elegies in both form and imagery, and the freedom with which vernacular adaptors of the psalms went about their work in Anglo-Saxon England suggests an appropriation of the psalter not as the sacred and unchanging Word but as words that could be turned to use for meditation, study, reading, and private prayer. Worth investigation are both individual figures who used the psalms such as Bede, Alfred, and Ælfric, and also the unknown compilers and scribes who developed new layouts for psalter manuscripts and repurposed earlier or Continental manuscripts for use in Anglo-Saxon England. In Latin and in the vernacular, these codices were central to Anglo-Saxon spirituality, while some of them also continued to be used well into the later Middle Ages."] [Contents: Introduction: Roles and Functions of the Psalms in Anglo-Saxon England; 1. The Psalms in the Lives of Individuals in Anglo-Saxon England: Bede, Alfred, Ælfric; 2. Psalter Manuscripts in Conception and Use: Three Case Studies; 3. The Psalms in the Material Culture of Anglo-Saxon England; 4. The Bilingual Psalters; 5. The Psalms in Old English Texts: Allusion and Adaptation; 6. The Psalms in Old English Texts: Source and Structure; 7. Afterlife: An Anglo-Saxon Perspective on Some Anglo-Norman Psalters.] [* Subject Heading: Manuscript Culture; Anglo-Saxon England; psalters; medieval devotional literature *]

Trapp, J. B., ed. Manuscripts in the Fifty Years after the Invention of Printing: Some Papers Read at a Colloquium at the Warburg Institute on 12-13 March 1982. London: Warburg Institute, University of London, 1983. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); early printed books: production; incunabula; relation of manuscripts and books *]

Warren, Michelle R. "Translation." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 51-67. [* Subject Heading: Manuscript culture; Middle English literature *]

Wilson, R. M. The Lost Literature of Medieval England. London: Methuen, 1952. [An account, based on the study of references to books in wills and similar documents, of works which were known in the Middle Ages but of which there are no longer any known extant copies.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); reading and readers; libraries and repositories (historical); provenance; manuscript ownership and collecting *]



Bibliography: [ Some basic resources ] | [ General bibliography ] | [ History of the book ] | [ Literacy and education, medieval and early modern (readers and reading) ] | [ Archival research ] | [ Forgeries / bibliographic fraud ] | [ Dictionaries (historical) ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: production ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: catalogues ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: facsimiles ] | [ Diplomatics: the study of historical documents ] | [ Printing, history of ] | [ Publishing, history of ] | [ Libraries and repositories, history of; book collecting ] | [ Manuscript culture ] | [ Manuscript culture: patronage ] | [ Manuscripts: codicology ] | [ Manuscripts: paleography ] | [ Manuscript production ] | [ Manuscript production: scribes and scribal practices ] | [ Manuscript production: decoration and illustration ] | [ Manuscript production: material culture (paper, bindings, etc.) ] | [ Manuscripts: catalogues and finding aids ] | [ Manuscripts: facsimiles and facsimile editions ] | [ Sigillography (the study of seals) ] | [ Textual criticism and editing ] | [ Keyword search of entire bibliography ]


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© 1998, 2015 Stephen R. Reimer
English; University of Alberta; Edmonton, Canada
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Created: 29 Oct. 1998; Last revised: 7 June 2015

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