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Manuscript Studies
Medieval and Early Modern

Bibliography: Manuscript Culture


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Arlinghaus, Franz-Josef, ed. The Writing Phenomenon in Medieval Society. CD-ROM [issued in two versions, one in English and one in German]. Utrecht Studies in Medieval Literacy 4. Turnhout: Brepols, 2001. [Based on a 13-year research project, "Pragmatic Literacy in the Middle Ages," at the Sonderforschungsbereich 231, Münster, this explores the idea of the "Gutenberg Galaxy" (a culture based on the written rather than the spoken word) as it existed before Gutenberg.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; orality and literacy *]

Barratt, A. Anne Bulkeley and her Book: Fashioning Female Piety in Early Tudor England. Texts and Transitions 2. Turnhout: Brepols, 2009. [Publisher's description: "This study is focused on BL MS Harley 494, a small manuscript book which can be dated between 1532 and 1535 and which has many of the features of a preces privatae volume, or private prayer book. It contains prayers in English and Latin but also a number of brief devotional treatises in English. MS Harley 494 possesses two more features of interest: it belonged to a Hampshire widow, Anne Bulkeley (and possibly later to her daughter Anne, a nun at Amesbury Priory); and it emerged from a Birgittine textual community. Barratt edits and annotates the complete manuscript to provide an accessible and informative edition of this little known manuscript. However, Anne Bulkeley and her Book is not a conventional edition of a late Middle English text. Rather, Barratt carefully contextualizes the manuscript within its historical background just before the Dissolution of the Monasteries, and meticulously investigates the varied, and often unusual, sources of many of the individual items in the book. In addition, the discussion encompasses several related manuscripts (principally Lambeth Palace MS 3600 and the so-called Burnet Psalter (Aberdeen University Library MS 25)). This broad focus enables the volume to examine not only the evolution of the manuscript as a whole, but also to answer wider questions of its owner's identity, her family connections, and her (and her book's) place in literary, cultural, and religious history."] [Contents: The Manuscript and its Ownership -- Contexts: Nuns, Holy Maids, and the Politics of Religion -- Sources: Ghostly Fathers and Approved Women -- Sources: Primers and Prayer Books -- Dominant Devotional Themes and Modulations -- Appendix: London, British Library, MS Harley 494: Annotated Transcription.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture: early modern; London, British Library, MS Harley 494; education and literacy: female; women and gender studies; authors and authorship; book ownership; religion and literature; devotional texts; lay piety *]

Baswell, Christopher. "Multilingualism on the Page." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 38-50. [* Subject Heading: Manuscript culture; Middle English literature; multilingual manuscripts, scribes *]

Bishop, Chris, ed. Text and Transmission in Medieval Europe. Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Cambridge Scholars, 2007. [A collection of essays on the complexities of medieval discourse. From the publisher's description: "The medievalist . . . faces particular constraints in interpreting . . . texts through the agencies of their transmission. Questions such as who authored these texts, when and why, intersect with problems of transcription, translation and redaction to inform a complex discourse."] [Contents: "Introduction: Text and transmission in Medieval Europe," Chris Bishop, Walter Kudrycz, John Martyn, Bronwen Neil, and Diane Speed; "The Irish birdman: kingship and liminality in Buile Suibhne," Bridgeette Slavin; "The eunuch Narses," John Martyn; "The politics of hagiography in ninth-century Rome," Bronwen Neil; "The 'lost' literature of England: text and transmission in tenth-century Wessex," Chris Bishop; "Close to the edge: The Fortunes of Men and the limits of wisdom literature," Robert DiNapoli; "Perpetual devotion: interpreting Medieval Mariology," Walter Kudrycz; "Illuminating ritual texts: text, image and the creation of sacred space in Jewish manuscripts of the Iberian peninsula," Vanessa Crosby; "A Ballad of Twelfth Day: texts and contexts," Diane Speed; "Appendix I: an edition of Twelfth Day."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; literary transmission *]

Boffey, Julia. "Bodleian Library MS Arch. Selden. B.24 and Definitions of the 'Household Book.'" In The English Medieval Book: Studies in Memory of Jeremy Griffiths. Ed. A. S. G. Edwards, Vincent Gillespie, and Ralph Hanna. British Library Studies in the History of the Book. London: British Library, 2000. Pp. 125-134. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; household miscellanies; Geoffrey Chaucer *]

Boffey, Julia. "Manuscript and Print: Books, Readers and Writers." In A Companion to Medieval Poetry. Ed. Corinne J. Saunders. Blackwell Companions to Literature and Culture 67. Chichester, and Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010. Pp. 538-554. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); early printed books: production; incunabula; literacy and education, medieval and early modern (reading and readers); authors and authorship; scribes and scribal practices; relation of manuscripts and books *]

Boffey, Julia, and A. S. G. Edwards. "Literary Texts." In The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain, Vol. 3: 1400-1557. Ed. Lotte Hellinga and J. B. Trapp. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. Pp. 555-575. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; transmission of texts; literacy and education, medieval and early modern (readers and reading) *]

"Book." In The Oxford Companion to Chaucer. Ed. Douglas Gray. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003. Pp. 59-62. [A consideration of the word "book" as a keyword in Chaucer studies and medieval literature.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; medieval books; authors and authorship; Geoffrey Chaucer *]

Bourgain, Pascale, and Laura Light. Bestsellers. Primer 4. Paris and New York: Les Enluminures, 2014. [Publisher's description: A short illustrated pamphlet which "assembles a group of manuscripts that survive in many hundreds of copies to explore the idea of the medieval 'bestseller.' Medieval 'bestsellers' were the texts considered truly important, and thus preferentially copied, during the Middle Ages. The texts in this collection include some that are still read today, alongside others, of equal significance, that are hardly known even to scholars and almost certainly seldom read."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; types of manuscripts; frequently copied works *]

Boyle, Leonard E. Integral Palaeography. Intro. F. Troncarelli. Textes et études du moyen âge 16. Turnhout: Brepols, 2001. [A collection of Father Boyle's articles on manuscripts and palaeography.] [Contents: Manuscripts and incunabula in the Library of San Clemente, Rome -- The emergence of Gothic handwriting, in the year 1200 -- Optimist and recensionist: 'common errors' or 'common variations'? -- Peciae, apopeciae, and a Toronto manuscript of the 'Sententie libri ethicorum' of Aquinas -- Pecia, apopeciae, epipecia -- 'Epistulae venerunt parum dulces': la place de la codicologie dans l'édition des textes latins médiévaux -- Tonic accent, codicology and literacy -- The ways of prayer of St. Dominic -- The 'Basilicanus' of Hilary revisited -- The Nowell Codex and the poem of Beowulf -- The 'Breviary of St. Dominic' -- The friars and reading in public.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; scribes and scribal practices; paleography; codicology *]

Brantley, Jessica. "Vision, Image, Text." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 315-334. [* Subject Heading: Manuscript culture; Middle English literature *]

Breay, Claire and Bernard Meehan, eds. The St Cuthbert Gospel: Studies on the Insular Manuscript of the Gospel of John. London: British Library, 2015. [Publisher's description: "The St. Cuthbert Gospel (formerly known as the Stonyhurst Gospel) is the earliest surviving intact European book and thus one of the world's most historically important books. Made in the late seventh century, the manuscript contains a copy of the Gospel of St. John in Latin, that was placed in the coffin of St. Cuthbert when he was re-interred at Lindisfarne in 698. Cuthbert's coffin was subsequently removed to Durham, where it was opened in September 1104 on the occasion of the translation of his remains, and the book was discovered inside. The Gospel was acquired for the collection of the British Library in 2012 after a major fundraising campaign. This new collection of essays is the most substantial study of the book since the 1960s. It includes scholarly pieces on Cuthbert in his historical context; the codicology, text, script and medieval history of the manuscript; the structure and decoration of the binding; the other relics found in Cuthbert's coffin; and the post-medieval ownership of the book."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; manuscripts, medieval; Anglo-Saxon period; Bible: New Testament; London, British Library, Additional MS 89000 *]

Brown, George Hardin, and Linda Ehrsam Voigts, eds. The Study of Medieval Manuscripts of England: Festschrift in Honor of Richard W. Pfaff. Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies 384; Arizona Studies in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance 35. Tempe, AZ, and Turnhout, Belgium: ACMRS (Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies), in collaboration with Brepols, 2010. [A collection of sixteen studies of manuscripts produced in medieval England.] [Contents: "Rebellion and perseverance: the profession of lay brothers in the Order of Sempringham and the votive mass for conversi," Janet Sorrentino; "A lost treatise by Amalarius: new evidence from the twelfth century," Christopher A. Jones; "Pembroke College 302: abbreviated Gospel book or Gospel lectionary?" Elizabeth C. Teviotdale; "Page design for the Becket vigil: making something out of nothing," Andrew Hughes; "The role of Old Sarum in the processions of Salisbury Cathedral," William Peter Mahrt; "The sanctorals of early Sarum missals and breviaries, c.1250-c.1350," Nigel Morgan; "Unexpected texts for saints in some Sarum breviary manuscripts," Sherry Reames; "Priests and pastoral care in early Anglo-Saxon England," Alan Thacker; "The Wilfridian annals in Winchester Cathedral Library MS 1 and Durham Cathedral Library MS B.ii," Joshua A. Westgard; "The Old English Boethius, the Latin commentaries, and Bede," Joseph Wittig; "The panorama of the crusades, 1096 to 1218, as seen in Yates Thompson MS 12 in the British Library," Jaroslav Folda; "William Reed, Bishop of Chichester (d. 1385), bibliophile," Rodney Thomson; "Who was Gilbert the Englishman?" Michael McVaugh; "The monks of Westminster and the peculium," Barbara F. Harvey; "Curiosities from a sermon book," Siegfried Wenzel; "Moral philosophy in England after Grosseteste: an 'underground' history," Charles F. Briggs.] [* Subject heading: Manuscript Culture: medieval England *]

Brown, Michelle P. The Book and the Transformation of Britain, c. 550-1050: A Study in Written and Visual Literacy and Orality. Sandars Lectures in Bibliography, 2009. London: British Library, 2011. [Publisher's description: "Between 550 and 1050 AD, the world of late Roman Antiquity was utterly transformed, becoming a patchwork region of independent states that eventually coalesced into empires and nations, each with distinct, emerging identities. In The Book and the Transformation of Britain, esteemed medievalist Michelle P. Brown explores the impact of this transformative era in British history by looking at the manuscripts and written records that were produced during that time. Brown's analysis of the changing of the British Isles pays particular attention to the role of the manuscript book, which was one of the greatest and most effective agents of change--one that also managed to preserve tradition. Through a close examination of written volumes and documents, Brown pieces together a fascinating and highly illustrated account of the literary culture of the time, including levels of literacy and its social perception."] [Contents: Introduction: what does 'literacy' mean in this period? -- Conversion: scribes, the sacred and social change: From pamphlet to pandect: the codex and the codification of scripture; The book as Speculum of the transition from late Antiquity to the Early Middle Ages; Visualising sound in graphic form: new ways of teaching and learning; Dissemination scripture: being the book- the scribe as evangelist -- Creating communities of reading: The rise of written vernacular languages; Women and the book in the pre-Alfredian era; Inscriptions- words to be seen and not heard?; books and other icons -- Language, literature and libraries: The impetus of incomers; Official intervention? Accessing the Alfredian contribution; Libraries: the collection and retention of cultural memory; Women and other bibliophiles; The last word.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; history of the book; medieval education and literacy; readers and reading, social aspects; illumination of books and manuscripts; early Middle Ages; Old English literature; Anglo-Saxon period *]

Brown, Michelle P. The Lindisfarne Gospels: Society, Spirituality, and the Scribe. The British Library Studies in Medieval Culture. London: British Library, 2003. [Publisher's description: "The questions of where and when the Lindisfarne Gospels were made are addressed, but just as importantly the 'why' is explored, in the context of new research concerning the technical innovation of its maker, his spiritual motivation and the needs of the society in which he worked."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; codicology; paleography (history of handwriting); Lindisfarne Gospels (London, British Library, Cotton MS Nero D.iv); early medieval England: Northumbria; Anglo-Saxon period; illuminated manuscripts *]

Brown, Michelle P. The Lindisfarne Gospels and the Early Medieval World. London: British Library, 2011. [Subject heading: manuscript culture; Lindisfarne Gospels (London, British Library, Cotton MS Nero D.iv); early medieval England: Northumbria; Anglo-Saxon period; illuminated manuscripts *]

Brown, Michelle P. Manuscripts from the Anglo-Saxon Age. 2nd ed. London: British Library; Toronto and Buffalo: University of Toronto Press, 2007. [Publisher's description: "Anglo-Saxon England was one of the most sophisticated states in the medieval West, renowned for its ecclesiastical and cultural achievements. The written word was of tremendous importance in this transformation. Within in a century of the introduction of Christianity and literacy, the book had become a central element of Anglo-Saxon society, and a rich vehicle for cultural and artistic expression. This new book by a leading expert on the period, Michelle P. Brown, provides an authoritative introduction to the art of book production in the Anglo-Saxon period and an historical overview of the period by means of its book culture. It illustrates in colour over 140 examples of the finest Anglo-Saxon books, from the British Library and other major collections."] [Contents: The Insular World: Celts, Britons and Anglo-Saxons -- Southumbria: the Rise of Mercia and Wessex -- Shaping England: from Alfred to Ælfric -- The second Viking Age: Cnut to the Conquest.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture: early Middle Ages; manuscript production; illumination of books and manuscripts; Old English manuscripts; Anglo-Saxon period *]

Brown, Michelle P. Painted Labyrinth: The World of the Lindisfarne Gospels. London: British Library, 2003. [Publisher's description: "The Lindisfarne Gospels is one of the world's greatest works of art in book form. It is an 8th-century Latin Gospelbook, with a 10th-century gloss, which is the earliest surviving translation of the Gospels into the English language. Its maker was one of the greatest artists of the Anglo-Saxon and Celtic worlds, receptive to new influences and prepared to experiment with new techniques. The book is thought to have been made around 715-720 in the island monastery of Lindisfarne (Holy Island) in the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Northumbria in north-eastern England. It is without doubt one of the great landmarks of human cultural achievement: the attempt of a gifted individual to express a whole society's identity and belief with an energy and passion that still inspire. Painted Labyrinth is a general introduction to the background and history of this breathtaking artwork and symbol of Christian faith. Highly illustrated and very readable, the book is divided into short sections, each examining an aspect of the Anglo-Saxon world, the heritage of the people who lived and ruled at this time, and how and why this great book was created."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; Lindisfarne Gospels (London, British Library, Cotton MS Nero D.iv); early medieval England: Northumbria; Anglo-Saxon period; illuminated manuscripts; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination) *]

Brown, Michelle P. Understanding Illuminated Manuscripts: A Guide to Technical Terms. "Looking at" Series: Getty Trust Publications, J. Paul Getty Museum. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (glossaries); manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination) *]

Caie, Graham D., and Denis Renevey, eds. Medieval Texts in Context. London and New York: Routledge, 2008. [Publisher's description: "This collection of essays by leading experts in manuscript studies sheds new light on ways to approach medieval texts in their manuscript context. Each contribution provides groundbreaking insight into the field of medieval textual culture, demonstrating the various interconnections between medieval material and literary traditions. The contributors' work aids reconstruction of the period's writing practices, as contextual factors surrounding the texts provide clues to the 'manuscript experience.'"] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; literacy and education, medieval and early modern; Middle English; literary transmission; reading and readers *]

Caillet, Jean-Pierre, and Marie-Pierre Laffitte, eds. Les manuscrits carolingiens: Actes du colloque de Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, le 4 mai 2007. Bibliologia 27. Turnhout: Brepols, 2009. [Papers presented at a colloquium held in conjunction with the exhibition "Trésors carolingiens," which was on display at the Bibliothèque nationale in Paris from Mar. 2 to June 24, 2007.] [Contents: "Caractères et statut du livre d'apparat carolingien: origines et affirmation," Jean-Pierre Caillet; "Les Évangiles de Saint-Denis et l'influence de l'école de la cour de Charlemagne sur les scriptoria de Francie occidentale," Fabrizio Crivello; "Entre imitation et invention: un livre d'Évangiles de style tourangeau (Paris, BnF, ms. latin 269)," Charlotte Denoël; "Jerome and Vergil in Carolingian frontispieces and the uses of translation," Herbert L. Kessler; "Le redécouverte des manuscrits carolingiens par les érudits et les collectionneurs français (VXIe-XVIIIe siècles)," Marie-Pierre Laffitte; "Early Carolingian manuscripts and ivories," Lawrence Nees; "La visibilité de Dieu dans les Bibles carolingiennes," Anne-Orange Poilpré; "Étude technique sur les décors de manuscrits carolingiennes," Patrica Roger; "Le renouvellement des études scientifiques autour des manuscrits carolingiens: de Léopold Delisle à Bernhard Bischoff," Jean Vezin.] [* Subject heading: Manuscript Culture: medieval; northern Europe: Carolingian period *]

Calabrese, Michael, and Stephen H. A. Shepherd, eds. "Yee? Baw for bokes": Essays on Medieval Manuscripts and Poetics in Honor of Hoyt N. Duggan. Los Angeles: Marymount Institute Press / Tsehai Publishers, 2013. [Festschrift for Professor Duggan, "a pioneer in matters of medieval prosody and the founder of the Piers Plowman Electronic Archive." The title is a quotation from Piers Plowman B.xi.135.] [Contents: Bibliography of works by Hoyt N. Duggan; "The B archetype of Piers Plowman as a corpus for metrical analysis," Thorlac Turville-Petre; "'The Bridges at Abingdon': An unnoticed alliterative poem," Ralph Hanna; "Some final -e's in the Hoccleve holographs," John Burrow; "Final -e in the Middle English translation of Palladius's Opus agricultura," Judith Jefferson; "John But and the problem of Langlandian authority," Thomas A. Prendergast; "Filling the gap in Piers Plowman A: Trinity College, Dublin, MS 213," Míċeál F. Vaughan; "'He is inwardly flayde': Inscription and the Wakefield Buffeting's self-incriminating Jew," Regula Meyer Evitt; "HM 128 as a medieval book," Michael Calabrese; "Text-image articulation in MS Douce 104," Stephen H. A. Shepherd; "The shadow of the book: Piers Plowman, the Ilchester prologue, and inhumane revision," D. Vance Smith; "Intellect, influence, and evidence: The elusive allure of the Ht scribe," Patricia R. Bart; "Langland as a proto-Protestant: Was Thomas Fuller right?" Robert Adams; "Audience and text: The Rylands Lydgate manuscripts," A. S. G. Edwards.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; William Langland; Thomas Hoccleve; John Lydgate; Richard Forman, poem on the bridges at Abingdon; Wakefield Master; medieval drama; Dublin, Trinity College, MS 213; San Marino, Huntington Library, MS HM 128; Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Douce 104; Manchester, John Rylands University Library, MS Eng. 1 and MS Eng. 2 *]

Chaytor, H. J. From Script to Print: An Introduction to Medieval Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1945. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); early printed books: production; incunabula; relation of manuscripts and books *]

"Chinese Manuscripts: Chinese Palaeography and Epigraphy." Imre Galambos (Reader in Chinese Studies at the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Cambridge). [<http://shahon.org>.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (China); Dunhuang studies; Tangut studies; history of Chinese writing *]

Cohen, Adam S. The Uta Codex: Art, Philosophy, and Reform in Eleventh-Century Germany. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2000. [Publisher's description: "The Uta Codex is a Gospel lectionary made in the early eleventh century for the Niedermunster convent in Regensburg (Bavaria). Created at the behest of the abbess Uta, it is not only one of the most beautiful Ottonian manuscripts but also one of the most complex. . . . In this groundbreaking study, Adam Cohen provides comprehensive explications of the codex's renowned illuminations as well as the first thorough investigation of its historical context. Cohen shows that the lavish miniatures, among the most elaborate pictures of the Middle Ages, use figures, ornaments, Latin tituli, and geometric schemata to fashion visual exegeses of great range and complexity. Through consideration of questions of function, patronage, and program, Cohen also demonstrates that the codex commemorates the abbess Uta's efforts to reform conventual life and education."] [Contents: The Historical Background: Uta and the Codex -- The Four Frontispieces -- Time, Eternity, and Virtue: The Hand of God -- Virgin of Virgins: The Dedication -- The Paradigmatic Form of the Cross: The Symbolic Crucifixion -- The Visual Polemics of Reform: Saint Erhard Celebrating the Mass -- The Evangelist Portraits -- The Harmony of Knowledge -- The Complete Manuscript --- Constructing the Illuminations -- The Historical Movement: Making and Using the Uta Codex.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; codicology; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination); Munich, Bayerischen Staatsbibliothek (Bavarian State Library), MS Clm 13601 *]

Coleman, Joyce. "Aurality." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 68-85. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; education and literacy: medieval and early modern (readers and reading); orality and literacy; transmission of texts *]

Connolly, Margaret. John Shirley: Book Production and the Noble Household in Fifteenth-Century England. Aldershot, Hants., and Brookfield, VT: Ashgate, 1998. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; manuscripts: production; reading and readers (patronage) *]

Connolly, Margaret, and Raluca Radulescu, eds. Insular Books: Vernacular Manuscript Miscellanies in Late Medieval Britain. Proceedings of the British Academy 201. Oxford: Oxford University Press, for the British Academy, 2015. [Publisher's description: "Medieval miscellanies are multi-text manuscripts, made up of varied contents, often in a mixture of languages. They might be the work of one compiler or several, and might have been put together over a short period of time or over many years (even over several generations). Such mixed manuscripts are much more common that we might imagine and indeed are a typical environment for the survival of medieval texts. . . . The essays in this volume discuss a great number of manuscript miscellanies produced in Britain in the 14th, 15th, and 16th centuries. Some of the essays offer new insights into very well-known miscellanies, whilst others draw attention to little-known volumes. Whilst previous studies of the miscellany have restricted themselves to disciplinary or linguistic boundaries, this collection uniquely draws on the expertise of specialists in the rich range of vernacular languages used in Britain in the later Middle Ages (Anglo-French, Middle English, Older Scots, Middle Welsh). As a result it has been possible to draw illuminating comparisons between miscellany manuscripts that were the products of different geographical areas and cultures. Collectively the essays in Insular Books explore the wide range of heterogeneous manuscripts that may be defined as miscellanies, and model approaches to their study that will permit a deeper and more nuanced understanding of the production of these assemblages, as well as their circulation and reception in their own age and beyond."] [Contents: Introduction, Margaret Connolly and Raluca Radulescu; "Texts in Conversation: Charlemagne Epics and Romances in Insular Plural-Text Codices," Marianne Ailes and Phillipa Hardman; "Multilingualism, the Harley Scribe, and Johannes Jacobi," Keith Busby; "Literary Scribes: The Harley Scribe and Robert Thornton as Case Studies," Susanna Fein; "The Organisation of Multilingual Miscellanies: the Contrasting Fortunes of Middle English Lyrics and Romances," Ad Putter; "John Northwood's Miscellany Revisited," Wendy Scase; "Vying for Attention: the Contents of Trinity College Dublin MS 432," Raluca Radulescu; "The Chivalric Miscellany: Classifying John Paston's 'Grete Boke,'" Andrew Taylor; "Amateur Book Production and the Miscellany in Late-Medieval East Anglia: Tanner 407 and Beinecke 365," Carol Meale; "Writing Without Borders: Multilingual Content in Welsh Miscellanies from Wales, the Marches and Beyond," Ceridwen Lloyd-Morgan; "Welsh Bardic Miscellanies," Dafydd Johnston; "Lancelot of the Laik and the Literary Manuscript Miscellany in Fifteenth- and Sixteenth-Century Scotland," Emily Wingfield; "Entertainment Networks, Reading Communities, and the Early Tudor Anthology: Bodliean Library, MS Rawlinson C. 813," Deborah Youngs; "Aberystwyth, National Library of Wales, MS Peniarth 12: The Development of a Bilingual Miscellany, Welsh and English," William Marx; "Towards a Taxonomy of Middle English Manuscript Assemblages," Julia Boffey and A. S. G. Edwards; "The Whole Book and the Whole Picture: Editions and Facsimiles of Medieval Miscellanies and their Influence," Margaret Connolly; "Afterword," Ardis Butterfield.] [* Subject heading: Manuscript culture; manuscript miscellanies, medieval and early modern (nature, types); medieval audience; social context *]

Crick, Julia, and Alexandra Walsham, ed. The Uses of Script and Print, 1300-1700. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; scribes and scribal practices; palaeography (history of handwriting); history of printing; material production (typography) *]

Crosby, Everett U., C. Julian Bishko, Robert L. Kellogg, eds. Medieval Studies: A Bibliographical Guide. Garland Reference Library of the Humanities 427. New York and London: Garland Publishing, 1983. [Includes sections on Manuscripts, the Illumination of Manuscripts, Paleography, and Medieval Libraries, among many other interesting subjects.] [* Subject heading: manuscript studies (bibliographies) *]

D'Amico, John F. "Manuscripts." In The Cambridge History of Renaissance Philosophy. Ed. Charles B. Schmitt, Quentin Skinner, Eckhard Kessler, and Jill Kraye. Cambridge, New York, New Rochelle, Melbourne, and Sydney: Cambridge University Press, 1988. Pp. 11-24. ["A comprehensive history of the role played by manuscripts in Renaissance thought is yet to be written. . . ."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); early modern manuscripts *]

Dagenais, John. The Ethics of Reading in Manuscript Culture: Glossing the "Libro de buen amor." Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1994. [Publisher's description: "Reexamining the roles played by author, reader, scribe, and text in medieval literary practice, John Dagenais argues that the entire physical manuscript must be the basis of any discussion of how meaning was made. Medievalists, he maintains, have relied too heavily on critical editions that seek to create a single, definitive text reflecting an author's intentions. In reality, manuscripts bear not only authorial texts but also a variety of elements added by scribes and readers. Using the surviving manuscripts of the fourteenth-century Libro de buen amor, Dagenais shows how consideration of the physical manuscripts and their cultural context can shed new light on interpretive issues that have puzzled modern readers."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; authors and authorship; reading and readers; medieval education and literacy; manuscript glosses and commentary *]

Daniels, Rhiannon. Boccaccio and the Book: Production and Reading in Italy, 1340-1520. Italian Perspectives 19. London: Legenda / Modern Humanities Research Association and Maney Publishing, 2009. [Publisher's description: "As a new digital era increasingly impacts on the 'age of print,' we are ever more conscious of the way in which information is packaged and received. The influence of the material form on the reading process was no less important during the gradual shift from manuscript to early print culture. Focusing on the physical structure and presentation of manuscripts and printed books containing texts by one of the most influential authors of the medieval period, Rhiannon Daniels traces the evolving social, cultural, and economic profile of Boccaccio's readership and the scribes and printers who laboured to reproduce three of his works: the Teseida, Decameron, and De mulieribus claris."] [Contents: Authorship, publication and the importance of materiality -- Teseida -- Decameron -- De mulieribus claris.] [Subject heading: manuscript culture; early modern book culture; manuscript production (material culture); codicology; literacy and education, readers and reading (medieval and early modern); authors and authorship; scribes and scribal practices; relation of manuscripts and books; Giovanni Boccaccio *]

Donaldson, E. Talbot. "The Manuscripts of Chaucer's Works and their Use." In Geoffrey Chaucer: Writers and their Background. Ed. D. S. Brewer. London: G. Bell and Sons, 1974. Pp. 85-108. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Dulac, Liliane. Une femme de lettres au moyen âge: Études autour de Christine de Pizan. Orléans: Éditions Paradigme, 1995. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; authors and authorship (female, woman, women); women's and gender studies; Christine de Pizan *]

Dwyer, R. A. "The Appreciation of Handmade Literature." Chaucer Review 8 (1974): 221-240. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Eckhardt, Joshua, and Daniel Starza Smith. Manuscript Miscellanies in Early Modern England. Material Readings in Early Modern Culture. Farnham, Surrey, and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2014. [Publisher's description: "Perhaps more than any other kind of book, manuscript miscellanies require a complex and 'material' reading strategy. This collection of essays models and refines the study of these complicated volumes. Using extensive textual and bibliographical evidence, it offers stimulating new readings of literature, politics and religion in the early modern period, and promises to make important interventions in the history of the book."] [Contents: "Introduction: the emergence of the English miscellany," Joshua Eckhardt and Daniel Starza Smith; "Before (and after) the miscellany: reconstructing Donne's Satyres in the Conway Papers," Daniel Starza Smith; "Donne, rhapsody and textual order," Piers Brown; "Early modern letter-books, miscellanies and the reading and reception of scribally copied letters," James Daybell; "The rector of Santon Downham and the Hieroglyphical Watch of Prague," Noah Millstone; "Unlocking the mysteries of Constance Aston Fowler's verse miscellany (Huntington Library MS 904): the Hand B scribe identified," Helen Hackett; "William Smith, Vere Southerne, Jesuit Missioner, and three linked manuscript miscellanies," Cedric C. Brown; "Attribution and anonymity: Donne, Ralegh and Fletcher in British Library, Stowe MS 962," Lara M. Crowley; "Copying epigrams in manuscript miscellanies," Joel Swann; "Camden's Remaines and a pair of epideictic poetry anthologies," Joshua Eckhardt; "'The disagreeable figure of a common-place' in Katherine Butler's late-seventeenth-century verse miscellany," Victoria E. Burke.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture, early modern (literary transmission); early modern manuscripts *]

Eriksen, Stefka Georgieva. Writing and Reading in Medieval Manuscript Culture: The Translation and Transmission of the Story of Elye in Old French and Old Norse Literary Contexts. Medieval Texts and Cultures of Northern Europe 25. Turnhout: Brepols, 2014. [Publisher's description: "This book relates a story about the writing, reading, and reception of one text in three different cultural and political contexts across Europe. The focus is on the story of the Christian knight Elye and his Saracen princess Rosamunde, which was translated into Old Norse in the thirteenth century. This is a study of three of the manuscripts in which the work is preserved: one Old French manuscript from Flanders (BnF, fr. 25516, c.1280) and two Old Norse manuscripts, one from Norway (DG 4-7 Fol., c.1270) and one from Iceland (Holm Perg 6 4to, c.1400). These manuscripts represent three different rhetorical and communicative situations and show how the writing and reading of the same text was conditioned by the respective cultural and political environment. The book innovatively conveys Old Norse culture as an active respondent, participant, and thus modulator of European literary tendencies. Tracing the translation, transmission, and transformation of the text throughout Europe redefines aspects of the Latin-vernacular nexus in the Middle Ages, and thus presents a new and valuable voice in the discussion of medieval European literary and cultural systems."] [Contents: Writing and Reading in the Middle Ages -- Elye de Saint-Gille in BnF, MS fr. 25516 -- Elíss saga in De La Gardie 4-7 Fol. -- Elíss saga in Holm Perg 6 4to -- The Transmission and Transformation of a Text-Work: Comparative Analysis of Three Versions.] [* Subject heading: Manuscript culture; textual transmission; literature and society; readers and reading *]

Erler, Mary C. "Devotional Literature." In The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain, Vol. 3: 1400-1557. Ed. Lotte Hellinga and J. B. Trapp. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. Pp. 495-525. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; early modern book culture; literacy and education, medieval and early modern (readers and reading); religion and literature; lay piety *]

Farr, Carol Ann. The Book of Kells: Its Function and Audience. British Library Studies in Medieval Culture 4. London: British Library, 1997. [Dublin, Trinity College Library, MS 58.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Fein, Susanna, ed. The Auchinleck Manuscript: New Perspectives. Manuscript Culture of the British Isles 7. Woodbridge, Suffolk, and Rochester, NY: York Medieval Press / Boydell and Brewer, 2016. [Publisher's description: "Created in London c.1340, the Auchinleck manuscript (Edinburgh, National Library of Scotland Advocates MS 19.2.1) is of crucial importance as the first book designed to convey in the English language an ambitious range of secular romance and chronicle. Evidently made in London by professional scribes for a secular patron, this tantalizing volume embodies a massive amount of material evidence as to London commercial book production and the demand for vernacular texts in the early fourteenth century. But its origins are mysterious: who were its makers? its users? how was it made? what end did it serve? The essays in this collection define the parameters of present-day Auchinleck studies. They scrutinize the manuscript's rich and varied contents; reopen theories and controversies regarding the book's making; trace the operations and interworkings of the scribes, compiler, and illuminators; tease out matters of patron and audience; interpret the contested signs of linguistic and national identity; and assess Auchinleck's implied literary values beside those of Chaucer. Geography, politics, international relations and multilingualism become pressing subjects, too, alongside critical analyses of literary substance."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; manuscript production; medieval English romances; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology; Auchinleck MS (Edinburgh, National Library of Scotland, Advocates MS 19.2.1) *]

Forsyth, Katherine, ed. Studies on "The Book of Deer." Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2008. [Cambridge, Cambridge University Library, MS li.6.32. Ninth-century illustrated gospels, originating in the Celtic monastery of Deer in Aberdeen.] [Contents: Part 1: The gospel book. "The biblical text of The Book of Deer: evidence for the remains of a division system from its manuscript ancestry" (Appendix: A concordance of the display initials of The Book of Deer with the Ammonian sections/Eusebian canons), Thomas O'Loughlin; "Understanding the figurative style and decorative programme of The Book of Deer," Isabel Henderson; "The sick and the dying in The Book of Deer" (Appendix: Four rites compared), Gilbert Márkus; "The Book of Deer after c.1150" (Appendix: Unpublished writings by Henry Bradshaw concerning The Book of Deer), Patrick Zutshi. Part 2: The Property records. "The property records: diplomatic edition including accents," Roibeard Ó Maolalaigh; "The property records: text and translation," Katherine Forsyth, Dauvit Broun and Thomas Clancy; "On the possible functions of the accents in the Gaelic notes in The Book of Deer," Roibeard Ó Maolalaigh (Appendix: Statistical analysis, by Heidi Ann Lazar-Meyn); "The Scotticisation of Gaelic: a reassessment of the language and orthography of the Gaelic notes in The Book of Deer," Roibeard Ó Maolalaigh; "The toponymic landscape of the Gaelic notes in The Book of Deer" (Appendix: Early forms of place-names discussed in the text), Simon Taylor; "The syntax of the place-names," Richard Cox (Sabhal Mór Ostaig); "The property records in The Book of Deer as a source for early Scottish society," Dauvit Broun. Part 3: Deer in context. "Deer and the early church in North-Eastern Scotland," Thomas Clancy; "The stones of Deer," Katherine Forsyth; "The Cistercian abbey of Deer" (Appendix: Old Deer parish church), Richard Fawcett; "Deer and its abbots in the late Middle Ages," Mark Dilworth.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; Bible; Biblical manuscripts *]

Fox, Peter, ed. The Book of Kells: MS 58, Trinity College Library, Dublin: Commentary. Lucerne: Faksimile Verlag Luzern, 1990. [Dublin, Trinity College Library, MS 58.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; Bible; Biblical manuscripts; reading and readers *]

Gellrich, Jesse M. The Idea of the Book in the Middle Ages: Language Theory, Mythology, and Fiction. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1985. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); reading and readers *]

Gerritsen, Johan. "Have with You to Lexington! The Beowulf Manuscript and Beowulf." In In Other Words: Transcultural Studies in Philology, Translation, and Lexicology Presented to Hans Heinrich Meier on the Occasion of His Sixty-Fifth Birthday. Ed. J. Lachlan Mackenzie and Richard Todd. Dordrecht: Foris, 1989. Pp. 15-34. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; "Beowulf" manuscript (London, British Library MS Cotton Vitellius A.xv) *]

Gillespie, Alexandra. "Books." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 86-103. [* Subject Heading: manuscript culture; the idea of the book in the Middle Ages; book history; codicology *]

Goodman, Peter. The Silent Masters: Latin Literature and its Censors in the High Middle Ages. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2000. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; literary transmission; censorship; Latin literature; high middle ages *]

Green, Richard Firth. Poets and Princepleasers: Literature and the English Court in the Late Middle Ages. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1980. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); reading and readers *]

Hall, Thomas N., and Donald Scragg, eds. Anglo-Saxon Books and Their Readers: Essays in Celebration of Helmut Gneuss's "Handlist of Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts." Publication of the Richard Rawlinson Center. Kalamazoo, MI: Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, 2008. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; Old English manuscripts; Anglo-Saxon period; readers and reading *]

Hamburger, Jeffrey. "Medieval Self-Fashioning: Authorship, Authority, and Autobiography in Suso's Exemplar." In Christ Among the Medieval Dominicans. Ed. K. Emery Jr. and J. Wawrykow. Notre Dame, IN: Notre Dame University Press, 1998. Pp. 430-461. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; medieval education and literacy; authors and authorship *]

Hand, Joni M. Women, Manuscripts and Identity in Northern Europe, 1350-1550. Farnham, Surrey, and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2013. [Publisher's description: ". . . Hand sheds light on the reasons women of the Valois courts from the mid-fourteenth to the mid-sixteenth century commissioned devotional manuscripts. Visually interpreting the non-text elements--portraits, coats of arms, and marginalia--as well as the texts, Hand explores how the manuscripts were used to express the women's religious, political, and/or genealogical concerns. This study is arranged thematically according to the method in which the owner is represented. Recognizing the considerable influence these women had on the appearance of their books, Hand interrogates how the manuscripts became a means of self-expression beyond the realm of devotional practice. She reveals how noblewomen used their private devotional manuscripts as vehicles for self-definition, to reflect familial, political, and social concerns, and to preserve the devotional and cultural traditions of their families. Drawing on documentation of women's book collections that has been buried within the inventories of their fathers, husbands, or sons, Hand explores how these women contributed to the cultural and spiritual character of the courts, and played an integral role in the formation and evolution of the royal libraries in Northern Europe."] [Contents: Introduction -- Female book collectors in the Valois courts -- Women and religious manuscripts: identity expressed through patronage -- Visual demonstrations of identity -- Women and legacy: the generational transference of identity -- Conclusion.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; women and gender studies; art history; patrons and patronage; ownership and collecting; libraries and repositories; religion and literature; devotional texts *]

Hanly, Michael. "Courtiers and Poets: An International System of Literary Exchange in Fourteenth-Century Italy, France, and England." Viator 28 (1997): 305-332. [On Chaucer's imitation of Italian vernacular literature (including some consideration of how much he knew directly, including some consideration of the production and dispersal of manuscripts of Italian literature, or how much he relied upon French translations), by considering the careers of several continental "diplomats" with careers similar to that of Chaucer.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; literacy and education, medieval and early modern (readers and reading); Geoffrey Chaucer; literary transmission *]

Hanna, Ralph, III. "Lambeth Palace Library MS 487: Some Problems of Early Thirteenth-Century Textual Transmission." In Texts and Traditions of Medieval Pastoral Care: Essays in Honour of Bella Millett. Ed. Cate Gunn and Catherine Innes-Parker. Woodbridge, Suffolk: York Medieval Press / Boydell and Brewer, 2009. Pp. 78-88. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; literary transmission; medieval education and literacy; London, Lambeth Palace Library, MS 487 (the Lambeth Homilies) *]

Hanna, Ralph, III. "Middle English Manuscripts and Readers." In A Companion to Medieval Poetry. Ed. Corinne J. Saunders. Blackwell Companions to Literature and Culture 67. Chichester, and Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010. Pp. 196-215. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; readers and reading; literary transmission *]

Hanna, Ralph, III. "Middle English Manuscripts and the Study of Literature: Analytical Survey 4." New Medieval Literatures 4 (2001): 243-264. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; readers and reading; medieval education and literacy *]

Hanna, Ralph, III. Pursuing History: Middle English Manuscripts and Their Texts. Figurae: Reading Medieval Culture. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1995. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Harrington, John Henry. "The Production and Distribution of Books in Western Europe to the Year 1500." D.L.S. Diss., New York, Columbia University, 1956. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Henderson, George. From Durrow to Kells: The Insular Gospel-Books, 650-800. London: Thames and Hudson, 1987. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture: early Middle Ages; manuscript production; Bible; Insular Gospels; Northumbrian Renaissance; Irish manuscripts; Old English manuscripts; Anglo-Saxon period; Book of Kells (Dublin, Trinity College Library, MS 58); Book of Durrow (Dublin, Trinity College Library, MS 57) *]

Hennessy, Marlene Villalobos, ed. Tributes to Kathleen L. Scott: English Medieval Manuscripts: Readers, Makers and Illuminators. Tributes 4. London: Harvey Miller, 2008. [Contents: "Introduction: A Tribute to Kathleen Scott from Her Friends," Marlene Villalobos Hennessy; "Bibliography of Kathleen L. Scott," Linda L. Brownrigg; "Two English Fifteenth-Century Manuscripts in the Biblioteca Estense with Illumination Attributable to the 'Caesar Master,'" Jonathan J. G. Alexander; "The Baldry Pattern Book," Christopher de Hamel; "Penwork Decoration and its Significance in English Manuscripts of the Fourteenth Century," Lynda Dennison; "Pen-Work Flourishing of Initials in England from c.1380," A. I. Doyle; "Books Owned by Medieval Members of the Percy Family," A. S. G. Edwards; "The Merda Philosophorum: An English Problem," John Block Friedman; "The Mobile Page: 'Special Effects' in Some Late Medieval Manuscripts," Phillipa Hardman; "John Lydgate's Magnificat: Magnifying Scribal Difficulties," George R. Keiser; "The Newberry Library Stations of Rome," Jeanne Krochalis; "'O Vernicle': Illustrations of an Arma Christi Poem," Ann Eljenholm Nichols; "Hierarchies of Decoration in Early Fifteenth-Century English Books of Hours," Michael T. Orr; "Beyond Fidelity: The Illustration of Late Medieval Literary Texts," Derek Pearsall; "'Lewdecalenders' from Lynn," P. R. Robinson; "The Last Bohun Hours and Psalter," Lucy Freeman Sandler; "The Program of Illustration in National Library of Scotland, Advocates' Library MS 18.1.7 and Pierpont Morgan Library MS 648 of Nicholas Love's Mirror of the Blessed Life of Jesus Christ," Michael G. Sargent.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; manuscript production; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination); illuminated manuscripts; scribes and scribal practices; reading and readers *]

Hindman, Sandra. Book of Hours: A Medieval Bestseller. Paris and New York: Les Enluminures, 2008. [Publisher's description: "This catalogue presents 25 books of hours with pictures and short descriptions. It also provides an informative tutorial that illustrates their structure section by section."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; catalogues and finding aids (thematic) *]

Høgel, C., and E. Bartoli, eds. Medieval Letters: Between Fiction and Document. Utrecht Studies in Medieval Literacy 33. Turnhout: Brepols, 2015. [Publisher's description: "In this volume, which draws on the proceedings of the 'Medieval Letters between Fiction and Document' conference held in Siena in 2013, scholars . . . analyse the historical value of medieval letters in both Latin and other European languages and explore different disciplinary approaches to the field. Comprising contributions on methodology, Latin literature up to the fifteenth century, Byzantine and Romance literature, and courtly letters, this unique book also documents the debate on unedited texts--including women's love letters--and on celebrated cases of disputed authorship such as the Epistolae duorum amantium and Dante's Epistola to Cangrande. It thus offers a significant re-evaluation of the huge and partly unpublished heritage of medieval letters across Europe, and provides important insights into the use of these unique sources in social, literary, and legal history."] [Contents: Part 1: Methods. "Epistolary Voices and the Fiction of History," Wim Verbaal; "Medieval Letters and Letter Collections as Historical Sources: Methodological Questions, Reflections, and Research Perspectives (Sixth-Fifteenth Centuries)," Walter Ysebaert; "Lettere fittizie e lettere autentiche nel medioevo italiano (secoli XII-XIV)," Paolo Cammarosano. Part 2: Before ars dictaminis: The Early Middle Ages. "La lettera di Ermenrico tra finzione e realtà," Francesco Mosetti Casaretto; "Un precedente del ars dictaminis medieval: las epistolae de Eginardo," Carlos Pérez González. Part 3: The Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries: Ars dictaminis and the "epistolary turn." "Il valore sociale dell'ars dictaminis e il self-fashioning dei dettatori communali," Florian Hartmann; "Da Maestro Guido a Guido Faba: autobiografismo e lettera d'amore tra la seconda e la terza generazione di dettatori," Elisabetta Bartoli; "Il Registrum di Paolo Camaldolese: elementi contenutistici e stilistici," Vito Sivo; "Aegidius of Paris and His Two Letters to Bishop Odo," Greti Dinkova-Bruun; "Powerful Women in the Epistles of Hildebert of Lavardin," Roberto Angelini. Part 4: Women and Love Letters. "What Really Matters in Medieval Women's Correspondence," Joan M. Ferrante; "Il pubblico della Rota Veneris di Boncompagno di Signa," Paolo Garbini; "Women's Love Letters from Tegernsee," Peter Dronke; "The Play of Ambiguity in the Medieval Latin Love Letters of the Ovidian Age (Baudri of Bourgeuil and Gerald of Wales)," Marek Thue Kretschmer; "Queen Kunhuta's Epistles to Her Husband," Francesca Battista; "Irony and Subtext in Latin Letters of the Eleventh and Twelfth Century," C. Stephen Jaeger. Part 5: Documents, Literary Letters and Collections in Byzantium and Beyond. "From Letter to Literature: A Byzantine Story of Transformation," Michael Grünbart; "The Actual Words of Theodore Graptos: A Byzantine Saint's Letter as Inserted Document," Christian Høgel; "'If It Looks Like a Letter, Reads Like a Letter, and Talks Like a Letter': The case of Nikephoros Gregoras' Letter Collection," Divna Manolova; "La lettre et ses adresses," Sylvie Lefèvre. Part 6: The Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries and the Diffusion of Epistolary Rhetoric. "Ars Dictaminis: Victim of Ars Notarie?" Ronald Witt; "Indagine su un disguido epistolare: l'Epistola a Cangrande fra Verona e Padova," Thomas Ricklin; "Essential Issues Concerning the Epistle to Cangrande," Alberto Casadei; "Dalle lettere cancelleresche ai dictamina: processi di finzionalizzazione e tradizione testuale," Fulvio Delle Donne; "From Letters to Dictamina and Back: Recycling Texts and Textual Collections in Late Medieval Europe (Thirteenth-Fourteenth Centuries)," Benoît Grévin; "Brown Ink, Red Blood: The Plotting of the Sicilian Vespers," Julia Bolton Holloway. Part 7: Late Medieval Court Letters. "Tra resoconto della quotidianità e progetto di futuro: la lettera come strumento pedagogico nella corte sforzesca della seconda metà del Quattrocento," Monica Ferrari e Federico Piseri; "Christine de Pizan in Correspondence: The Epistolary Exchange Waxes Poetic with Eustache Deschamps," Maria A. Soleti; "Memorial de Agravios: Letters of Grievances as Documents in Fifteenth-Century Castilian Historiography," Sacramento Roselló-Martínez.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; letters; diplomatics; ars dictaminis *]

Holzknecht, Karl Julius. Literary Patronage in the Middle Ages. Philadelphia: Collegiate Press, 1923. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers (patronage) *]

Horobin, Simon, and Aditi Nafde, eds. Pursuing Middle English Manuscripts and their Texts: Essays in Honour of Ralph Hanna. Texts and Transitions 10. Turnhout: Brepols, 2017. [Publisher's description: "This volume brings together essays by leading authorities on the production, reception, and editing of medieval English manuscripts in honour of Ralph Hanna, on the occasion of his retirement as Professor of Palaeography at the University of Oxford. Ralph Hanna has made an enormous contribution to the study of Middle English manuscripts; his numerous essays and books have discussed the development of London literature, alliterative poetry (especially Piers Plowman), regionalism, and the production and circulation of manuscripts. The essays included in this volume are arranged into four major sections corresponding to Ralph Hanna's core areas of interest: Manuscript production; Dialect; Regionalism; Reading and Editing manuscripts. These essays, written by leading scholars in their fields, offer new insights into the manuscripts of major Middle English writers and on scribal practice, as well as studies of individual codices. Essays cover a wide regional and chronological range, stretching from the beginnings of London literature traced in the works of Peter of Cornwall to the circulation of John Lydgate's Troy Book, and encompassing manuscripts and texts composed and circulated outside the capital. Dialectal studies offer reconsiderations of the evidence for a Wycliffite orthography, the dialect of William Langland, and the vocabulary of the alliterative Morte Arthure. A final section on reading and editing investigates the structure and divisions in the manuscripts of the A Version of Piers Plowman, and examines specific readings in the Prick of Conscience and the Canterbury Tales. The volume also includes a tribute to Ralph Hanna and a list of his extensive publications."] [Contents: Introduction, Simon Horobin and Aditi Nafde; "The Tribulations of Scribes," Derek Pearsall; "A Scribe of Lydgate's Troy Book and London Book Production in the First Half of the Fifteenth Century," Linne R. Mooney; "The Vocabulary of the Alliterative Morte Arthure," Thorlac Turville-Petre; "Langland's Dialect Reconsidered," Simon Horobin; "Observations on the 'Wycliffite Orthography'," Anne Hudson; "Cambridge University Library Ms Ll.1.18: A Southwell Miscellany," Richard Beadle; "The Migration of a Fifteenth-Century Miscellany," A. I. Doyle; "'I Saw a Dead Man Won the Field': The Genesis of The Battle of Otterburn," Richard Firth Green; "The Prick of Conscience and the Imagination of Paradise," Alastair Minnis; "Peter of Cornwall's Booktongue and the Invention of London Literature," Andrew Galloway; "The Prologues and Ends of Piers Plowman A," Anne Middleton; "Three Troublesome Lines in Chaucer's General Prologue: 11 (So Priketh Hem Nature), 176 (The Space), 739 (Crist Spak Himself Ful Brode)," Traugott Lawler; Ralph Hanna's Publications.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; manuscript production; scribes and scribal practices; transmission of texts; textual criticism and editing; Geoffrey Chaucer; William Langland; John Lydgate *]

Humphreys, Kenneth W. "Some Progress towards the History of the Manuscript Book and Its Users?" In Miscellanea Codicologica F. Masai Dicata, MCMLXXIX. Ed. Pierre Cockshaw, et al. Pubs. de Scriptorium 8. Ghent: Story-Scientia, 1979. Pp. 589-595. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; history of the book *]

Hutchinson, A. M. "Devotional Reading in the Monastery and in the Late Medieval Household." In De cella in seculum: Religious and Secular Life and Devotion in Late Medieval England; An Interdisciplinary Conference in Celebration of the Eighth Centenary of the Consecration of St. Hugh of Avalon, Bishop of Lincoln, 20-22 July, 1986. Ed. Michael G. Sargent. Cambridge, and Wolfeboro, NH: D. S. Brewer / Boydell and Brewer, 1989. Pp. 215-227. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; medieval education and literacy; reading and readers *]

Jayatilaka, Rohinin. "Old English Manuscripts and Readers." In A Companion to Medieval Poetry. Ed. Corinne J. Saunders. Blackwell Companions to Literature and Culture 67. Chichester, and Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010. Pp. 51-64. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture: early Middle Ages; literacy and education, medieval and early modern; readers and reading; Old English literature; Anglo-Saxon period *]

Jensen, Kristian. "Text-Books in the Universities: The Evidence from the Books." In The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain, Vol. 3: 1400-1557. Ed. Lotte Hellinga and J. B. Trapp. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. Pp. 354-379. [* Subject Heading: medieval education and literacy; history of the book; readers and reading *]

Jones, Claire. "An Assortment of Doctors: The Readers of Medical Books in Late Medieval England." Journal of the Early Book Society 3 (2000): 136-151. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; medieval medicine; medieval education and literacy; reading and readers *]

Johnston, Michael, and Michael Van Dussen, eds. The Medieval Manuscript Book: Cultural Approaches. Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature 94. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015. [Publisher's description: "Traditional scholarship on manuscripts has tended to focus on issues concerning their production and has shown comparatively little interest in the cultural contexts of the manuscript book. The Medieval Manuscript Book redresses this by focusing on aspects of the medieval book in its cultural situations. Written by experts in the study of the handmade book before print, this volume combines bibliographical expertise with broader insights into the theory and praxis of manuscript study in areas from bibliography to social context, linguistics to location, and archaeology to conservation. the focus of the contributions ranges widely, from authorship to miscellaneity, and from vernacularity to digital facsimiles of manuscripts. Taken as a whole, these essays make the case that to understand the manuscript book it must be analyzed in all its cultural complexity, from production to transmission to its continued adaptation."] [Contents: "Introduction: Manuscripts and Cultural History," Michael Johnston and Michael Van Dussen; "Bibliographical Theory and the Textuality of the Codex: Towards a History of the Pre-Modern Book," Seth Lerer; "What is a Manuscript Culture?: Technologies of the Manuscript Matrix," Stephen G. Nichols; "Decoding the Material Book: Cultural Residue in Medieval Manuscripts," Erik Kwakkel; "Organizing Manuscript and Print: From Compilatio to Compilation," Jeffrey Todd Knight; "Containing the Book: The Institutional Afterlives of Medieval Manuscripts," Siân Echard; "Medieval Manuscripts: Media Archaeology and the Digital Incunable," Martin K. Foys; "The Circulation of Texts in Manuscript Culture," Pascale Bourgain; "Multilingualism and Late Medieval Manuscript Culture," Lucie Doležalová; "Miscellaneity and Variance in the Medieval Book," Arthur Bahr; "Vernacular Authorship and the Control of Manuscript Production," Andrew Taylor; "Medieval French and Italian Literature: Towards a Manuscript History," Keith Busby and Christopher Kleinhenz; "Afterword: Social History of the Book and Beyond," Kathryn Kerby-Fulton.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; book history; transmission of texts; literacy and education, medieval and early modern (readers and reading) *]

Jordan, William Chester. "Western Medieval Manuscripts and Teaching at Princeton." Princeton University Library Chronicle 51 (1989): 26-30. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Keiser, George R. "Practical Books for the Gentleman." In The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain, Vol. 3: 1400-1557. Ed. Lotte Hellinga and J. B. Trapp. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. Pp. 470-494. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; literacy and education, medieval and early modern (readers and reading); early printed books: ownership and collecting *]

Kelliher, Hilton, and Sally Brown. English Literary Manuscripts. London: British Library, 1986. [A brief and popular introduction to some of the manuscripts (primarily of works in the traditional English literary canon) which are preserved in the British Library.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Kelly, Stephen, and John J. Thompson. Imagining the Book. Medieval Texts and Cultures of Northern Europe 7. Turnhout: Brepols, 2005. [Publisher's description: "All fourteen essays in this volume question the status of the book in a predominantly manuscript culture. Some focus on the practical politics of book production and local circumstances; others focus on the visual experience of early readers. In this volume, the idea of the pre-modern vernacular book is pursued in terms of its miscellaneity and its association with localised writing projects undertaken by (and occasionally also for) a polyglot and sometimes also socially-aware English readership. Such investigation is valuable since it enables us to recognise the textual networks, the sources and the readership that mark the pre-modern codex as an important medium of social and literary exchange quite distinct from printed books."] [Contents: "Imagined Histories of the Book: Current Paradigms and Future Directions," Stephen Kelly and John J. Thompson; "The Whole Book: Late Medieval English Manuscript Miscellanies and their Modern Interpreters," Derek Pearsall; "Imagining X: A Lost Early Vernacular Miscellany," Neil Cartlidge; "Imagining Book Production in Fourteenth-Century Herefordshire: The Scribe of British Library, MS Harley 2253 and his 'Organizing Principles,'" Jason O'Rourke; "Imagining the Compiler: Guy of Warwick and the Compilation of the Auchinleck Manuscript," Alison Wiggins; "Leofric of Exeter and the Practical Politics of Book Collecting," Joyce Hill; "Ælfric's Lives of Saints and Cotton Julius E.vii: Adaptation, Appropriation and the Disappearing Book," Hugh Magennis; "A Fresh Look at the Reconstructed Carmelite Missal: London, British Library, MS Additional 29704-05," Valerie Edden; "John Dygon, Fifth Recluse of Sheen: His Career, Books, and Acquaintance," Ralph Hanna; "Imagining a Readership for Post-Conquest Old English Manuscripts," Mary Swan; "Constructing Audiences for Contemplative Texts: The Example of a Mystical Anthology," Barry Windeatt; "EB and his Two Books: Visual Impact and the Power of Meaningful Suggestion: 'Reading' the Illustrations in MSS Douce 261 and Egerton 3132A," Maldwyn Mills; "Deixis and the Untransferable Text: Anglo-Saxon Colophons, Verse-Prefaces and Inscriptions," Peter Orton; "A Portrait of the Reader: Secular Donors and their Books in the Art of the English Parish Church," David Griffith; "Imagining Alternatives to the Book: The Transmission of Political Poetry in Late Medieval England," Wendy Scase.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; manuscript production; literary transmission; readers and reading; the idea of the book; London, British Library, Harley MS 2253 (the Harley Lyrics); Edinburgh, National Library of Scotland, Advocates MS 19.2.1 (Auchinleck Manuscript); London, British Library, Cotton MS Julius E.vii (Ælfric); London, British Library, Addit. MSS 29704, 29705 (Carmelite Missal); Edward Banyster of Idsworth (possible identification of "EB"); London, British Library, Egerton MS 3132A; Oxford, Bodleian Library, Douce MS 261; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination); religion and literature; politics and literature *]

Kerby-Fulton, Kathryn, John J. Thompson, and Sarah Baechle, eds. New Directions in Medieval Manuscript Studies and Reading Practices: Essays in Honor of Derek Pearsall. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 2014. [Papers presented at the first Robert M. Conway Notre Dame London Center Conference, held at the Notre Dame Center in London on October 20-22, 2011. Publisher's description: "This volume gathers the contributions of senior and junior scholars--all indebted to the pathbreaking work of Derek Pearsall--to showcase new research prompted by his rich and ongoing legacy as a literary critic, editor, and seminal founder of Middle English manuscript studies."] [Contents: "A Brief Biographical Sketch of Derek Pearsall," Linne Mooney. Part 1: Celebrating Pearsallian Reading Practices (Foreword, Christopher Cannon). "Narrative and Freedom in Troilus and Criseyde," A. C. Spearing; "How Good is the Outspoken South English Legendary Poet?: A New Edition of the Prologue to the Conception of Mary," Oliver Pickering; "Derek Pearsall, Secret Shakespearean," Martha W. Driver. Part 2: England and International: Studies in Courtly Verse and Affectivity Inspired by the Work of Elizabeth Salter and Derek Pearsall at York (Foreword, William Marx). "The Tongues of the Nightingale: 'Hertely redying' at English Courts," Jocelyn Wogan-Browne; "Wings, Wingfields, and Wynnere and Wastoure," Susan Powell; "The Author of the Italian Meditations on the Life of Christ," Sarah McNamer; "Handling The Book of Margery Kempe: The Corrective Touches of the Red Ink Annotator," Katie Ann-Marie Bugyis. Part 3: The Making of a Field: York's 1981 Manuscripts and Readers Thirty Years Later (Foreword, John J. Thompson). "Assessing Manuscript Context: Visible and Invisible: Evidence in a Copy of the Middle English Brut," Julia Boffey; "Books with Marginalia from St. Mark's Hospital, Bristol," A. I. Doyle; "John Colyns, Mercer and Bookseller of London, and Cuthbert Tunstall's 'Second Monition' of 1526," Carol M. Meale; "Selling Lydgate Manuscripts in the Twentieth Century," A. S. G. Edwards. Part 4: Newer Directions in Manuscript Studies I: Regional and Scribal Identities (Foreword, Siân Echard). "'And fer ouer þe French flod': A Look at Cotton Nero A.x from an International Perspective," Hannah Zdansky; "Langlandian Economics in James Yonge's Gouernaunce: Translation and Ethics in Fifteenth-Century Dublin," Hilary E. Fox; "Manuscript Creation in Dublin: The Scribe of Bodleian e. Museo MS 232 and Longleat MS 29," Theresa O'Byrne. Part 5: Newer Directions in Manuscript Studies II: Women, Children, and Literacy at Work in Late Medieval and Early Tudor England (Foreword, Phillipa Hardman). "The Romance of History: Lambeth Palace MS 491 and its Young Readers," Nicole Eddy; "Langland in the Early Modern Household: Piers Plowman in Oxford, Bodleian Library MS Digby 145, and its Scribe-Annotator Dialogues," Karrie Fuller; "Playing as Literate Practice: Humanism and the Exclusion of Women Performers by the London Professional Stages," Maura Giles-Watson. Part 6: Chaucerian and Post-Chaucerian Reading Practices (Foreword, Edward Wheatley). "Quoting Chaucer: Textual Authority, the Nun's Priest, and the Making of the Canterbury Tales," Elizabeth Scala; "Chaucer, the Continent, and the Characteristics of Commentary," Sarah Baechle; "Hoccleve in Canterbury," Peter Brown; "The Legacy of John Shirley: Revisiting Houghton MS Eng 530," Stephen Partridge. Part 7: What a Poet is "Entitled to be Remembered By": Editorial Philosophies and the Langlandian Legacy of Derek Pearsall (Foreword, Nicolette Zeeman). "Was the C-Reviser's Manuscript Really So Corrupt?" Jill Mann; "Emending Oneself: Compilatio and Revisio in Langland, Usk, and Higden," Melinda Nielsen; "Confronting the Scribe-Poet Binary: The Z Text, Writing Office Redaction, and the Oxford Reading Circles," Kathryn Kerby-Fulton.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; literature and society (medieval and early modern); transmission of texts; Margery Kempe; "Gawain-poet"; William Langland; Geoffrey Chaucer; John Lydgate; Thomas Hoccleve; Thomas Usk; Ranulf Higden; early modern drama *]

Kingshirn, William E., and Linda Safran. The Early Christian Book. Intro. Philip Rousseau. CUA Studies in Early Christianity. Washington, DC: Catholic Press of America, 2007. [Publisher's description: "From the very beginning Christianity was a religion of books--a lived, but also a written faith. The essays in this collection focus on the ways in which books were produced, used, treasured and conceptualized in the early Christian centuries (AD 100-600)."] [* Subject heading: history of the book (late antiquity and early Middle Ages); the Bible; literary transmission; reading and readers; reception history *]

L'Engle, Susan, and Ariane Bergeron-Foote. Law. Primer 3. Paris and New York: Les Enluminures, 2014. [Publisher's description: A short illustrated pamphlet which "provides an overview of one of the most complex genre of codices of the Middle Ages. The twelve manuscripts present a coherent collection tracking the development of western European law--civil and canon--from Justinian to the sixteenth century."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; types of manuscripts; legal manuscripts *]

Laistner, M. Thought and Letters in Western Europe, A.D. 500-900. 2nd ed. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1957. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Lerer, Seth, ed. Reading from the Margins: Textual Studies, Chaucer, and Medieval Literature. A special issue of Huntington Library Quarterly 58 (1996). [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; Ellesmere Manuscript of the Canterbury Tales (San Marino, Huntington Library, MS EL 26.C.9); Geoffrey Chaucer *]

Light, Laura. Sermons. Primer 1. Paris and New York: Les Enluminures, 2013. [Publisher's description: A short illustrated pamphlet which introduces the genre of sermon manuscripts.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; types of manuscripts; homiletic works *]

Light, Laura. Women and the Book in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Intro. Anne Winston-Allen. TextManuscripts 5. Paris and New York: Les Enluminures, 2015. [Publisher's description: "This catalogue showcases 36 manuscripts that demonstrate the important role that women played as authors, artists, scribes, patrons and book-owners throughout the Middle Ages and the Renaissance."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; catalogues and finding aids (thematic); reading and readers (female, woman, women); female patronage *]

Light, Laura, and Susan Boynton. Sacred Song: Chanting the Bible in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. TextManuscripts 4. Paris and New York: Les Enluminures, 2014. [Publisher's description: This catalogue "brings together thirty-two manuscripts from the fourteenth to the nineteenth centuries that represent different aspects of the chant tradition, as well as other forms of sacred music."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; catalogues and finding aids (thematic) *]

Lionarons, Joyce Tally, ed. Old English Literature in its Manuscript Context. Medieval European Studies 5. Morgantown: West Virginia University Press, 2004. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; paleography (history of handwriting); Old English manuscripts; Anglo-Saxon period *]

Mann, Jill, and Maura Nolan, eds. The Text in the Community: Essays on Medieval Works, Manuscripts, Authors, and Readers. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 2006. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; literature; medieval manuscripts, social contexts; authors and authorship; readers and reading *]

Meale, Carol M., and Derek Pearsall, eds. Makers and Users of Medieval Books: Essays in Honour of A. S. G. Edwards. Cambridge, and Rochester, NY: D. S. Brewer / Boydell and Brewer, 2014. [Publisher's description: "Late medieval manuscripts and early modern print history form the focus of this volume. It includes new work on the compilation of some important medieval manuscript miscellanies and major studies of merchant patronage and of a newly revealed woman patron, alongside explorations of medieval texts and the post-medieval reception history of Langland, Chaucer and Nicholas Love. It thus pays a fitting tribute to the career of Professor A. S. G. Edwards, highlighting his scholarly interests and demonstrating the influence of his achievements."] [* Subject Heading: Manuscript Culture; patrons and patronage; manuscripts; codicology and palaeography; book production in the Middle Ages *]

Moore, D. L. Medieval Anglo-Irish Troubles: A Cultural Study of BL MS Harley 913. Texts and Transitions 8. Turnhout: Brepols, 2016. [Publisher's description: "British Library MS Harley 913 is an early fourteenth-century trilingual manuscript whose paradoxically devotional and ribald contents display many distinct aspects of the Anglo-Irish socio-political reality of the day. However, several of its texts have, in the past, suffered from repeated scholarly misreadings, in part because scholars have not taken the time to seriously consider the manuscript's contents as a whole, and in part because fluctuations in the political, social, and religious climate between Ireland and England have prejudiced how some scholars have approached these works. This book examines these texts, as well as their subsequent misinterpretations, in the order in which they occur in the manuscript and reveals the pattern of politicized discourse surrounding this important medieval Anglo-Irish cultural artefact that has hitherto obscured, rather than elucidated, the very personal interactions of some of the era's key figures. For the first time, this volume allows readers to visualize the manuscript in its entirety and complexity. Texts touching on the taboos of incest, regicide, and witchcraft, together with the clandestine manoeuvrings of the power-hungry and influential, reveal a surprisingly complicated interlacing of events across medieval Ireland, England, and the Continent."] [Contents: The Significance of British Library Manuscript Harley 913 -- The Contents of BL MS Harley 913 -- The Works of BL MS Harley 913 now only extant in BL MS Lansdowne 418 -- Conclusion -- Appendix: Texts of BL MS Harley 913 copied into BL MS Lansdowne 418.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture: Ireland; transmission of texts; London, British Library, MS Harley 913 *]

Morse, Charlotte C., Penelope Reed Doob, and Marjorie Curry Woods, eds. The Uses of Manuscripts in Literary Studies: Essays in Memory of Judson Boyce Allen. Studies in Medieval Culture 31. Kalamazoo: Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, 1992. [Contents: "Dante's Comedy, the codex, and the margin of error," R. Allen Shoaf; "In a nutshell: Verba and Sententia and matter and form in medieval composition theory," Marjorie Curry Woods; "How was the ars praedicandi taught in England?" Marianne G. Briscoe; "Contradictory paradigms: the labyrinth in art and literature," Penelope Reed Doob; "'Bothe text and gloss': manuscript form, the textuality of commentary, and Chaucer's dream poems," Martin Irvine; "Talking back to the text: marginal voices in medieval secular literature," Christopher Baswell; "Authors in love: the exegesis of late-medieval love-poets," Alastair J. Minnis; "Nimrod, the commentaries on Genesis, and Chaucer," John M. Fyler; "John of Cornwall's innovations and their possible effects on Chaucer," Cynthia Renee Bland; "Langland's reading: some evidence from mss. containing religious prophecy," Kathryn Kerby-Fulton; "What to call Petrarch's Griselda," Charlotte Cook Morse; "'Thys ys my mystrys boke': English women as readers and writers in late medieval England," Josephine Koster Tarvers.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; archival research; Geoffrey Chaucer; William Langland; education and literacy (female, woman, women) *]

Nix, Linda. "Early Medieval Book Design in England: The Influence of Manuscript Design on the Transmission of Texts." In A Millennium of the Book: Production, Design and Illustration in Manuscript and Print, 900-1900. Ed. Robin Myers, and Michael Harris. Publishing Pathways. Winchester: St Paul's Bibliographies; New Castle, DE: Oak Knoll Press, 1994. Pp. 1-21. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Ogilvy, Jack D. A. Books Known to Anglo-Latin Writers from Aldhelm to Alcuin (670-804). Mediaeval Academy of America, Studies and Documents 2. Cambridge, MA: Mediaeval Academy of America, 1936. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Ogilvy, Jack D. A. Books Known to the English, 597-1066. Cambridge, MA: Mediaeval Academy of America, 1967. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Olson, Glending. Literature as Recreation in the Later Middle Ages. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1982. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); reading and readers *]

Owen-Crocker, Gale R., ed. Working with Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts. Exeter Medieval Texts and Studies. Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 2009. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; manuscripts (catalogues: thematic [English poetry]); Old English manuscripts; Anglo-Saxon period.*]

Parkes, M. B. Scribes, Scripts and Readers: Studies in the Communication, Presentation and Dissemination of Medieval Texts. London, and Rio Grande, OH: Hambledon Press, 1991. [A broad and general study of scribes, manuscript production, and literary transmission. The book includes some consideration (pp. 19-33) of the medieval development of abbreviations and shorthand notation.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); scribes and scribal practices; manuscript production; abbreviations (tachygraphy; Tironian notae [Tiro the scribe, notes], etc.); paleography (history of handwriting); reading and readers *]

Partridge, Stephen. "Questions of Evidence: Manuscripts and the Early History of Chaucer's Works." In Writing after Chaucer: Essential Readings in Chaucer and the Fifteenth Century. Ed. Daniel J. Pinti. Basic Readings in Chaucer and His Time 1; Garland Reference Library of the Humanities 2040. New York: Garland Publishing, 1998. Pp. 1-26. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; Geoffrey Chaucer Works; literary transmission *]

Pearsall, Derek, ed. Manuscripts and Readers in Fifteenth-Century England. Cambridge: D. S. Brewer / Boydell and Brewer, 1983. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Pearsall, Derek. "Texts, Textual Criticism, and Fifteenth Century Manuscript Production." In Fifteenth-Century Studies: Recent Essays. Ed. Robert F. Yeager. Hamden, CT: Archon Books, 1984. Pp. 121-136. [On the importance to the student of literature of the study of manuscripts.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; textual criticism and editing *]

Pearsall, Derek. "The Uses of Manuscripts: Late Medieval English." Harvard Library Bulletin ns 4.4 (Winter 1993-1994): 30-36. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; archival research *]

Perry, Curtis, ed. Material Culture and Cultural Materialisms in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Arizona Studies in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance 5. Turnhout: Brepols Publishers, 2000. [* Subject heading: history of the book; manuscript culture; manuscript production *]

Powicke, (Sir) Frederick Maurice. The Medieval Books of Merton College. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1931. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); reading and readers; libraries and repositories (historical); provenance; manuscript ownership and collecting *]

Pratt, Karen, Bart Besamusca, Ad Putter, and Matthias Meyer, eds. The Dynamics of the Medieval Manuscript: Text Collections from a European Perspective. Göttingen V&R unipress / Vandenhoeck and Ruprecht, 2017. [Publisher's description: "This collection of essays examines the various dynamic processes by which texts are preserved, transmitted, and modified in medieval multi-text codices, focusing on the meanings generated by new contexts and the possible reader experiences provoked by novel configurations and material presentation. Containing essays on text collections from many different European countries and in a wide range of medieval languages, this volume sheds new light on common trends and regional differences in the history of book production and reading practices."] [* Subject headings: manuscript culture; miscellanies and anthologies; transmission of texts *]

Principe, Lawrence, and Laura Light. Alchemy. Primer 2. Paris and New York: Les Enluminures, 2013. [Publisher's description: A short illustrated pamphlet which "presents ten manuscripts from the collection of Joost R. Ritman in the Bibliotheca Philosophica Hermetica in Amsterdam. Professor Principe's contributions to this volume present a useful up-to-date guide to the often misunderstood subject and argue for the rightful position of alchemy in the development of modern science."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; types of manuscripts; alchemical works *]

Pulsiano, Phillip, and Elaine M. Treharne, eds. Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts and Their Heritage. Aldershot, Hants., and Brookfield, VT: Ashgate, 1998. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; scriptoria; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination); Old English manuscripts; Anglo-Saxon period *]

Reynolds, L. D., and N. G. Wilson. Scribes and Scholars: A Guide to the Transmission of Greek and Latin Literature. 3rd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; scribes and scribal practices *]

Richards, Mary P., ed. Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts: Basic Readings. Garland Reference Library of the Humanities 1434; Basic Readings on Anglo-Saxon England 2. New York and London: Garland Publishing, 1993; New York: Routledge, 2001. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture: early Middle Ages; reading and readers; Old English manuscripts; Anglo-Saxon period *]

Riddy, Felicity, ed. Prestige, Authority and Power in Late Medieval Manuscripts and Texts. York Manuscripts Conferences, Proceedings 4. Woodbridge, Suffolk, and Rochester, NY: York Medieval Press / Boydell and Brewer, in association with the Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York, 2000. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; authors and authorship; power and authority; *]

Robbins, Rossell Hope. Introduction. Secular Lyrics of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries. Ed. Rossell Hope Robbins. 2nd ed. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1955. Pp. xvii-lv. [The Introduction is very useful on the history, types, and transmission of Middle English lyrics generally. On pp. xvii-xxx, Robbins describes in some detail ten broad types of manuscripts in which Middle English lyrics appear.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Robertson, Kellie. "Authorial Work." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 441-458. [Legal and moral discussions of work, working, labour, and their relationship to authorial "labour."] [* Subject Heading: Manuscript culture; Middle English literature; authors and authorship; writing as labour (work, working) *]

Root, Robert Kilburn. "Publication before Printing." PMLA 28 (1913): 417-431. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Rouse, Mary A., and Richard H. Rouse. Authentic Witnesses: Approaches to Medieval Texts and Manuscripts. Publications in Medieval Studies 27. Notre Dame, IN: The Medieval Institute, University of Notre Dame Press, 1991. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; libraries and repositories (historical); provenance *]

Rust, Martha Dana. Imaginary Worlds in Medieval Books: Exploring the Manuscript Matrix. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. [Publisher's description: "This book envisions the confines of medieval manuscripts as the potential territory of many virtual worlds: realms that readers call forth through their imaginative interactions with a book's material features."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; medieval books; manuscript production; reception history; reading and readers; Middle English; scribes and scribal practices *]

Scase, Wendy, ed. Essays in Manuscript Geography: Vernacular Manuscripts of the English West Midlands from the Conquest to the Sixteenth Century. Medieval Texts and Cultures of Northern Europe 10. Turnhout: Brepols, 2007. [Publisher's description: "The medieval English West Midlands has long been associated with the production of vernacular texts, in Old and Middle English, and with the making of several famous manuscripts. The aim of this volume is to re-think assumptions about medieval literature and the region in the light of new research in medieval book history."] [Contents: "Bishops and their texts in the later eleventh century: Worcester and Exeter," Elaine Treharne; "Mobile libraries: Old English manuscript production in Worcester and the West Midlands, 1090-1215," Mary Swan; "The pastoral context of the Trinity and Lambeth homilies," Bella Millett; "Compilation and purpose in MS Harley 2253," Susanna Fein; "Oppositional thematics and metanarrative in MS Harley 2253, quires 1-6," Carter Revard; "Mapping points west of West Midlands manuscripts and texts: Irishness(es) and Midle English literary culture," John J. Thompson; "The Clopton manuscript and the Beauchamp affinity: patronage and reception issues in a West Midlands reading community," Ryan Perry; "Inventing visual history: re-presenting the legends of Warwickshire," Martha W. Driver; "Owners and copyists of John Rous's armorial rolls," David Griffith; "The manuscripts of the West Midlands Catalogue Project," Rebecca Farnham; "Middle English romance and the West Midlands," Alison Wiggins; "Fingerprinting paper in West Midlands medieval manuscripts," Orietta Da Rold.] [* Subject heading: Manuscript Culture; vernacular texts; Old English; Middle English; West Midlands(England); Harley Lyrics (London, British Library, MS Harley 2253); John Rous *]

Scattergood, V[incent] John. Manuscripts and Ghosts: Essays on the Transmission of Medieval and Early Renaissance Literature in England. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2006. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; literary transmission; early modern manuscripts; relation of manuscripts and books *]

Schieberle, Misty. Feminized Counsel and the Literature of Advice in England. Disputatio 26. Turnhout: Brepols, 2014. [Publisher's description: "The term 'feminized counsel' denotes the advice associated with and spoken by women characters. This book demonstrates that rather than classify women's voices as an opposite against which to define masculine authority, late medieval vernacular poets embraced the feminine as a representation of their subordination to kings, patrons, and authorities. The works studied include Gower's Confessio Amantis, Chaucer's Legend of Good Women and Melibee, and English translations of Christine de Pizan's Epistre Othea. To advise readers, these texts draw on the politicized genre of mirrors for princes. Whereas Latin mirrors such as the Secretum secretorum and Giles of Rome's De regimine principum represented women as inferior, weak, and detrimental to masculine authority, these vernacular texts break traditional expectations and portray women as essential and authoritative political counsellors. By considering Latin and French sources, historical models of queens' intercessions, and literary models of authoritative female personifications, this study explores the woman counsellor as a literary topos that enabled poets to criticize, advise, and influence powerful readers. Feminized Counsel elucidates the manner in which vernacular poets concerned with issues of counsel, mercy, and power identified with fictional women's struggles to develop authority in the political sphere. These women counsellors become enabling models that paradoxically generate authority for poets who also lack access to traditionally recognized forms of intellectual or literary authority."] [* Subject Heading: manuscript culture; English poetry; Middle English literature; women in literature *]

Schleif, Corine, and Volker Schier, eds. Manuscripts Changing Hands. Wolfenbütteler Mittelalter-Studien 31. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag in Kommission, 2016. ["Papers presented at a workshop held by the Herzog August Bibliothek in Wolfenbüttel in 2012."] [Contents: "Haptic communities: hands joined in and on manuscripts," Corine Schleif; "Textual communities: die frühmittelalterliche Regula solitariorum und die Waldbrüder und -schwestern im spätmittelalterlichen St. Gallen," Gabriela Signori; "Altering the printed page: reception and change in some French liturgical and civic manuscripts, thirteenth-fourteenth centuries," Alison Stones; "Too many cooks?: the multiple hands in a German convent homilary (Oxford, Bodleian Library, Ms. Douce 185)," Judith Oliver; "From hand to hand: transfers of liturgical books in the diocese of Cambrai in the Late Middle Ages," Barbara Haggh-Huglo; "An editor inserts himself: the case of Johannes in Wolfenbüttel, Herzog August Bibliothek, Cod. Guelf. 38 Helmst.," Volker Schier; "Bücher in den Händen von Klosterbibliothekaren: Befunde aus dem 15. und frühen 16. Jahrhundert am Beispiel der Kartause und des Benediktinerklosters in Erfurt," Matthias Eifler; "Where's Muri?: the progress of a manuscript collection with a destiny of dissolution," Nancy van Deusen; "An early eighteenth-century attempt to publish a facsimile of two Sachsenspiegel manuscripts," Madeline H. Caviness and Hiram Kümper.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; transmission of texts; scribes and scribal practices ; readers and reading *]

Sharpe, John, and Kimberly Van Kampen, eds. The Bible as Book: The Manuscript Tradition. London: British Library, 1997. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; Bible, history of *]

Shonk, Timothy A. "A Study of the Auchinleck Manuscript: Bookmen and Bookmaking in the Early Fourteenth Century." Speculum 60 (1985): 71-91. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; Auchinleck MS (Edinburgh, National Library of Scotland, Advocates MS 19.2.1) *]

Smith, Kathryn A. The Taymouth Hours: Stories and the Construction of the Self in Late Medieval England. London: British Library; Toronto and Buffalo: University of Toronto Press, 2012. [Publisher's Description: "The Taymouth Hours is one of the most fascinating and enigmatic English manuscripts of the later medieval period. In this, the first comprehensive study of the manuscript, Kathryn A. Smith argues that the Taymouth Hours was commissioned in 1331 by Philippa of Hainault, queen of Edward III, for Edward's sister, the 13-year old Eleanor of Woodstock, on the occasion of her betrothal to Reinald II of Guelders. Through detailed analysis of the manuscript's programme, particularly the relationship between its marginal imagery and the devotional texts which they border, and by embedding the manuscript within the dynamic context of historical, political, religious, cultural and artistic developments in early 14th-century northern Europe, this groundbreaking study explores the ways in which the stories pictured in the Taymouth Hours shaped and affirmed the self of their royal female viewer. (A DVD of the complete manuscript is also included.)"] [Subject heading: manuscript culture; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination); manuscripts (facsimiles and facsimile editions); Books of Hours; religion and literature; London, British Library, Yates Thompson MS 13 *]

Snijders, T. Manuscript Communication: Visual and Textual Mechanics of Communication in Hagiographical Texts from the Southern Low Countries, 900-1200. Utrecht Studies in Medieval Literacy 32. Turnhout: Brepols, 2015. ["[T]his book argues that the High Middle Ages witnessed a fundamental process of manuscript diversification and specialisation, which was at the basis of the thirteenth-century revolution in manuscript layout. . . ."] [* Subject heading: Manuscript culture; manuscript composition and layout *]

Steiner, Emily. "Authority." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 142-159. [* Subject Heading: Manuscript culture; Middle English literature *]

Steiner, Emily. "Medieval Documentary Poetics and Langland's Authorial Identity." In Crossing Boundaries: Issues of Cultural and Individual Identity in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Ed. Sally McKee. Arizona Studies in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance 3. Turnhout: Brepols, 1999. Pp. 79-105. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; William Langland; authors and authorship *]

Symes, Carol. "Manuscript Matrix, Modern Canon." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 7-22. [* Subject Heading: Manuscript Culture; manuscript contexts of literary works; canon creation; transmission and reception of literary works; medieval *]

Tavormina, M. Teresa, ed. Sex, Aging, and Death in a Medieval Medical Compendium: Trinity College Cambridge MS R.14.52; Its Text, Language, and Scribe. 2 vols. Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies 292. Tempe, AZ: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2006. [An edition of the various texts found in Trinity College MS $.14.52, accompanied by several introductory essays: "Description of the Manuscript," Päivi Pahta; "Contents, Unique Treatises, and Related Manuscripts," Patricia Deery Kurtz and Linda Ehrsam Voigts; "The Scribe," Linne R. Mooney; "The Dialect of the Hammond Scribe," Lister M. Matheson; "Translation Strategies: De spermate and De humana natura," Päivi Pahta and María José Carrillo Linares.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; manuscript production; medical miscellanies; Cambridge, Trinity College, MS R.14.52 (James Cat. MS 922) *]

Taylor, Andrew. "Authors, Scribes, Patrons, and Books." In The Idea of the Vernacular: An Anthology of Middle English Literary Theory, 1280-1520. Ed. Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, Nicholas Watson, Andrew Taylor, and Ruth Evans. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1999. Pp. 353-365. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; manuscript production; scribes and scribal practices; reading and readers; patrons and patronage; authors and authorship; the idea of the book in the Middle Ages *]

Taylor, Andrew. "The Myth of the Minstrel Manuscript." Speculum 66 (1991): 43-73. [Includes refs. to various lyric collections which include items by Lydgate and Chaucer, etc. The codicological category of "Minstrel Manuscript" has a long history (here traced) but remains dubious as a classification for existing manuscripts. Chansons de geste, Middle English romances, and Middle English lyrics are generally preserved in late manuscripts, intended for private libraries in an age of growing lay literacy. Even existing manuscripts which might have been owned by "minstrels" were probably not used by them on their travels but read at home. True minstrel copies of minstrel repertory pieces have probably not survived the hard treatment to which they would have been subjected.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); manuscript production; reading and readers; manuscripts (codicological study); codicology; libraries and repositories (historical); provenance; manuscript ownership and collecting *]

Taylor, Jane H. M. The Making of Poetry: Late-Medieval French Poetic Anthologies. Texts and Transitions 1. Turnhout: Brepols, 2007. [Publisher's description: "In this ground-breaking book, Jane H. M. Taylor explores some late-medieval lyric anthologies. Taking a cue from the French sociologist, Pierre Bourdieu, she sets poetic creation in the context of an understanding of the structures of court society, and sketches the range of social, intellectual and aesthetic positions available to the poet and the patron. Her primary focus is on a series of manuscripts which, she argues, reveal much about the socioliterary dynamics of particular poems, and about the way in which they are vessels for the participation by individuals in a common culture of literary exchange: Charles d'Orléans's personal manuscript, BNF français 25458, in which, she argues, the poets leave implicit or explicit traces of their social interactions; his duchess Marie's album, Carpentras 375, which is interestingly different from the Duke's; BNF fr. 9223 and n.a.f. 15771, 'coterie' manuscripts which allow us to see how social milieu determines shared literary forms and conventions; Marguerite d'Autriche's Album poétique, Brussels BR 10572, an anthology which is a cultural commodity allowing a princely court to recognise stylistic expertise and control of form. She finishes by examining the first great French poetic anthology, Antoine Vérard's Jardin de Plaisance (1501), which seeks to recreate, knowingly and imaginatively, via rubrics, illustrations, and choice of texts, the elite sociability for which the other anthologies are evidence."] [Contents: Introduction: Ditties of Pleasure -- Courtiers and Crafts Men: The Social and Manuscript Context of Fifteenth-Century Lyric -- Preserved as in a Violl: Charles d'Orléans' Circle and his Personal Manuscript -- Sundrie Occasions, Sundrie Gentlemen: The Coterie Manuscript -- A Priest of Poetry to the People: Antoine Vérard and the Anthology -- Conclusion: Wounding the Text.] [* Subject heading: Manuscript culture (literary transmission): medieval France; literature and society: French; lyric poetry; readers and reading *]

Toswell, M. J. The Anglo-Saxon Psalter. Medieval Church Studies 10. Turnhout: Brepols, 2014. [Publisher's description: "The first comprehensive analysis of the use of the psalms in Anglo-Saxon England, this book particularly addresses the manuscripts and texts in which the psalms appeared, and the use of those manuscripts and texts in Anglo-Saxon England and later. The psalms are at the heart of Christian devotion, in the Middle Ages and still today. Learned early and sung weekly by every medieval monastic and cleric, the psalms were the language Christ and his ancestor David used to speak to God. Powerful and plaintive, angry and anguished, laudatory and lamenting: the psalms expressed the feelings and thoughts of the individuals who devised them and those who sang them privately or publicly in Anglo-Saxon England many generations later. Psalters from Anglo-Saxon England are the largest surviving single group of manuscripts, and also form a very significant percentage of the fragments of manuscripts extant from the period. Psalters were central to the liturgy, particularly for the daily Office, and were the first schoolbooks for the learning of Latin and Christian doctrine. Moreover, from Anglo-Saxon England comes the earliest complex of vernacular psalter material, including glossed and bilingual psalters, complete psalter translations, and poems based on individual psalms and on psalmic structures. The lament psalms are remarkably similar to the Old English elegies in both form and imagery, and the freedom with which vernacular adaptors of the psalms went about their work in Anglo-Saxon England suggests an appropriation of the psalter not as the sacred and unchanging Word but as words that could be turned to use for meditation, study, reading, and private prayer. Worth investigation are both individual figures who used the psalms such as Bede, Alfred, and Ælfric, and also the unknown compilers and scribes who developed new layouts for psalter manuscripts and repurposed earlier or Continental manuscripts for use in Anglo-Saxon England. In Latin and in the vernacular, these codices were central to Anglo-Saxon spirituality, while some of them also continued to be used well into the later Middle Ages."] [Contents: Introduction: Roles and Functions of the Psalms in Anglo-Saxon England -- The Psalms in the Lives of Individuals in Anglo-Saxon England: Bede, Alfred, Ælfric -- Psalter Manuscripts in Conception and Use: Three Case Studies -- The Psalms in the Material Culture of Anglo-Saxon England -- The Bilingual Psalters -- The Psalms in Old English Texts: Allusion and Adaptation -- The Psalms in Old English Texts: Source and Structure -- Afterlife: An Anglo-Saxon Perspective on Some Anglo-Norman Psalters.] [* Subject heading: Manuscript Culture; Anglo-Saxon England; psalters; medieval devotional literature *]

Trapp, J. B., ed. Manuscripts in the Fifty Years after the Invention of Printing: Some Papers Read at a Colloquium at the Warburg Institute on 12-13 March 1982. London: Warburg Institute, University of London, 1983. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); early printed books: production; incunabula; relation of manuscripts and books *]

Treharne, Elaine, and Orietta Da Rold, eds. Cambridge Companion to Medieval British Manuscripts. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, [forthcoming]. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; manuscript production *]

Turville-Petre, Thorlac. "Texts and Manuscripts." Chap. 2 of his Reading Middle English Literature. Blackwell Introductions to Literature 15. Oxford, and Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2006. Pp. 35-58. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; textual transmission *]

Van Duzer, Chet, and Ilya Dines. Apocalyptic Cartography: Thematic Maps and the End of the World in a Fifteenth-Century Manuscript. Leiden: Brill, 2016. [Publisher's description: "Chet Van Duzer and Ilya Dines analyse Huntington Library HM 83, an unstudied manuscript produced in Lübeck, Germany. The manuscript contains a rich collection of world maps produced by an anonymous but strikingly original cartographer. These include one of the earliest programs of thematic maps, and a remarkable series of maps that illustrate the transformations that the world was supposed to undergo during the Apocalypse. The authors supply detailed discussion of the maps and transcriptions and translations of the Latin texts that explain the maps. Copies of the maps in a fifteenth-century manuscript in Wolfenbüttel prove that this unusual work did circulate."] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; Bible; Book of Revelation; Apocalypse manuscripts; images of the Apocalypse (apocalyptic); maps and mapping; cartography; San Marino, Huntington Library, MS HM 83 *]

Vulić, Kathryn R., Susan Uselmann, and C. Annette Grisé, eds. Devotional Literature and Practice in Medieval England: Readers, Reading, and Reception. Disputatio 29. Turnhout: Brepols, 2016. [Publisher's description: "This work offers a collection of essays examining the reading and reception of devotional texts in medieval England, from representations of readers and reading in devotional texts, to manuscripts and early books as devotional objects. It also recognises that religious writings care deeply about how devotional reading takes place, providing models for improving reading as a way of improving one's ability to worship."] [Contents: Introduction. "Devotional reading in late medieval England: problems of definition," Susan Uselmann; "'Þe lettere sleeþ': Lollards, literalism, and the definition of bad readers," Anna Lewis; "Speculum vitae and 'lewed' reading," Kathryn Vulić; "Representing reading in Dives and pauper," Elizabeth Schirmer; "Meditative reading and the vespers antiphon in the monastic office for Saint Cuthbert," Karmen Lenz; "Lectio divina and scriptural reading in Syon's vernacular printed books," C. Annette Grisé; "A matter of convenience: Nicholas Love's Mirror of private devotional reading," Susan Uselmann; "Printing, propaganda, and profit: Richard Pynson and the Life of St. Radegund," Christina M. Carlson; "'For the prouffyte of other': Lady Margaret Beaufort and the female reader as translator in The mirrour of golde to the synfull soule," Stephanie Morley; "Bodleian Library MS Holkham Miscellany 41 and the modelling of women's devotion," Catherine Innes-Parker; "Afterword: Adaption, negotiation and transformation," C. Annette Grisé.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; literacy and education (readers and reading); female literacy and reading; women and gender studies; religion and literature; lay piety; Nicholas Love; Richard Pynson *]

Warren, Michelle R. "Translation." In Middle English. Ed. Paul Strohm. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 51-67. [* Subject Heading: Manuscript culture; Middle English literature *]

Watson, Nicholas. "The Politics of Middle English Writing." In The Idea of the Vernacular: An Anthology of Middle English Literary Theory, 1280-1520. Ed. Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, Nicholas Watson, Andrew Taylor, and Ruth Evans. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1999. Pp. 331-352. [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; use of vernacular language; Middle English literature *]

Wilson, R. M. The Lost Literature of Medieval England. London: Methuen, 1952. [An account, based on the study of references to books in wills and similar documents, of works which were known in the Middle Ages but of which there are no longer any known extant copies.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture (literary transmission); reading and readers; libraries and repositories (historical); provenance; manuscript ownership and collecting *]

Wranovix, Matthew P. "Parish Priests and Their Books: Reading, Writing, and Keeping Accounts in the Late Medieval Diocese of Eichstätt." Ph.D. diss., Yale University, 2007. [This dissertation examines the acquisition and use of texts by the parish clergy in the diocese of Eichstätt between 1400 and 1520 and argues that the late medieval parish clergy enjoyed much greater access to non-liturgical literature than has been previously thought.] [* Subject heading: manuscript culture; medieval education and literacy; book ownership and collecting; readers and reading; religion and literature *]



Bibliography: [ Some basic resources ] | [ General bibliography ] | [ History of the book ] | [ Literacy and education, medieval and early modern (readers and reading) ] | [ Archival research ] | [ Forgeries / bibliographic fraud ] | [ Dictionaries (historical) ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: Early Modern book culture ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: production ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: catalogues ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: facsimiles ] | [ Diplomatics: the study of historical documents ] | [ Printing, history of ] | [ Publishing, history of ] | [ Libraries and repositories, history of; book collecting ] | [ Manuscript culture ] | [ Manuscript culture: patronage ] | [ Manuscripts: codicology ] | [ Manuscripts: paleography ] | [ Manuscript production ] | [ Manuscript production: scribes and scribal practices ] | [ Manuscript production: decoration and illustration ] | [ Manuscript production: material culture (paper, bindings, etc.) ] | [ Manuscripts: catalogues and finding aids ] | [ Manuscripts: facsimiles and facsimile editions ] | [ Sigillography (the study of seals) ] | [ Textual criticism and editing ] | [ Keyword search of entire bibliography ]


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© 1998, 2017 Stephen R. Reimer
English; University of Alberta; Edmonton, Canada
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Created: 29 Oct. 1998; Last revised: 27 Nov. 2017
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