[Image: Herebert page]

Manuscript Studies
Medieval and Early Modern

Bibliography: Literacy and education, medieval and early modern; Readers and reading


You are here: > Main Page > Bibliography > Literacy and education


Adamson, J. W. "The Extent of Literacy in England in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries: Notes and Conjectures." The Library 4th ser. 10 (1929-1930): 163-193. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Auerbach, Erich. Literary Language and Its Public in Late Latin Antiquity and in the Middle Ages. Trans. Ralph Manheim. New York: Pantheon, 1965. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Ayres, Harry Morgan. "Chaucer and Seneca." The Romanic Review 10 (1919): 1-15. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; Geoffrey Chaucer (reading, education) *]

Barber, Giles. Arks for Learning: A Short History of Oxford Library Buildings. Oxford: Oxford Bibliographical Society, 1995. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Baron, Frank. "The Historical Doctor Faustus at the University of Heidelberg." In The Universities in the Late Middle Ages. Ed. Jozef Ijsewijn and Jacques Paquet. Mediaevalia Lovaniensia Series 1, Studia 6. Louvain: Leuven University Press, 1978. Pp. 381-395. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Barron, Caroline M. "The Expansion of Education in Fifteenth-Century London." In The Cloister and the World: Essays in Medieval History in Honour of Barbara Harvey. Ed. John Blair and Brian Golding. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996. Pp. 219-245. [Argues that, through the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, there is a steady growth in the quantity and variety of elementary education in English literacy skills in London: "grammar masters [and school mistresses: female teachers are mentioned on pp. 225 and 244] and informal schools are ubiquitous in London by the end of the fifteenth century; free schooling was also available, and there was an expectation that boys and girls would have mastered reading and writing before embarking upon their training as apprentices" (245). "Many of these educational opportunities were also available to girls and to women, the ability of women to read and to write [in English] is frequently assumed and is not considered remarkable" (244).] [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy (female, woman, women) *]

Bennett, H[enry] S[tanley]. "The Author and His Public in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries." Essays and Studies by Members of the English Association 23 (1938): 7-24. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; reading and readers; authors and authorship *]

Bennett, H[enry] S[tanley]. English Books and Readers 1558 to 1603: Being a Study in the History of the Book Trade in the Reign of Elizabeth I. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1965. [* Subject heading: early modern education and literacy; reading and readers; early printed books *]

Bennett, H[enry] S[tanley]. English Books and Readers 1603 to 1640: Being a Study in the History of the Book Trade in the Reigns of James I and Charles I. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1970. [* Subject heading: early modern education and literacy; reading and readers; early printed books *]

Bennett, H[enry] S[tanley]. English Books and Readers 1475 to 1557: Being a Study in the History of the Book Trade from Caxton to the Incorporation of the Stationer's Company. 2nd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1969. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; Early modern education and literacy; reading and readers; early printed books; incunabula *]

Bennett, J. A. W. The Humane Medievalist and Other Essays in English Literature and Learning, from Chaucer to Eliot. Ed. Piero Boitani. Rome: Edizioni di storia e letteratura, 1982. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Bernardo, Aldo S., and Saul Levin, eds. The Classics in the Middle Ages. Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies 69. Binghamton, NY: Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies (Centre for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, SUNY), 1990. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Boas, M. "De librorum Catonianorum historia atque compositione." Mnemosyne ns 42 (1914): 17-46. [Pratt's summary of the changes to the collection of school texts grouped around the Disticha Catonis through the centuries is based (ultimately) on this.] [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Boffey, Julia. "Women Authors and Womens' Literacy in Fourteenth- and Fifteenth-Century England." In Women and Literature in Britain, 1150-1500. Ed. Carol M. Meale. Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature 17. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993. Pp. 159-182. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; reading and readers (female, woman, women); authors and authorship *]

Boyarin, Jonathan, ed. The Ethnography of Reading. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1993. [* Subject heading: modern books; modern education and literacy; reading and readers *]

Bräuml, F. H. "Varieties and Consequences of Medieval Literacy and Illiteracy." Speculum 55 (1980): 237-265. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Brooks, Greg, and A. K. Pugh, eds. Studies in the History of Reading. [Reading]: Centre for the Teaching of Reading, University of Reading School of Education, with the United Kingdom Reading Association, 1984. [Papers presented at the first Colloquium on the History of Reading.] [* Subject heading: history of the book; reading and readers *]

Brooks, Greg, A. K. Pugh, and Nigel Hall, eds. Further Studies in the History of Reading. Widnes, Cheshire: United Kingdom Reading Association, 1993. ["Papers presented at the second Colloquium on the History of Reading which was held at the then Manchester Polytechnic, now Manchester Metropolitan University, in November 1985."] [* Subject heading: history of the book; reading and readers *]

Brusendorff, Aage. "He Knew nat Catoun for his Wit was Rude." In Studies in English Philology: A Miscellany in Honor of Frederick Klaeber. Ed. Kemp Malone and Martin B. Ruud. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1929. Pp. 320-339. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Burke, Mary, ed. Women, Writing, and the Reproduction of Culture in Tudor and Stuart Britain. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1999. [* Subject heading: early modern education and literacy; reading and readers (female, woman, women); authors and authorship *]

Burke, Peter. Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe. New York: New York University Press, 1978. [* Subject heading: history of the book; early modern education and literacy; reading and readers *]

Burke, Victoria E. "Constructing the Woman Reader in Barnabe Riche, John Lyly, and Marguerite de Navarre." In Narrative Strategies in Early English Fiction. Ed. Wolfgang Gortschacher and Holger Klein. Lewiston, NY, and Salzburg, Austria: Paul Mellen Press, 1995. Pp. 115-131. [* Subject heading: early modern education and literacy; reading and readers (female, woman, women) *]

Burke, Victoria E. "Contexts for Women's Manuscript Miscellanies: The Case of Elizabeth Lyttelton and Sir Thomas Browne." Yearbook of English Studies 33 (2003): 316-328. [* Subject heading: early modern education and literacy; manuscript production; scribes and scribal practices; reading and readers (female, woman, women); authors and authorship *]

Burke, Victoria E. "Medium and Meaning in the Manuscripts of Anne, Lady Southwell." In Women's Writing and the Circulation of Ideas: Manuscript Publication in England, 1550-1800. Ed. George L. Justice and Nathan P. Tinker. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. Pp. 94-120. [* Subject heading: early modern education and literacy; manuscript production; scribes and scribal practices; reading and readers (female, woman, women); authors and authorship *]

Burke, Victoria E. "Reading Friends: Women's Participation in 'Masculine' Literary Culture." In Early Modern Women's Manuscript Writing: Selected Papers from the Trinity/Trent Colloquium. Ed. Victoria E. Burke and Jonathan Gibson. Aldershot, Hants.: Ashgate, 2004. Pp. 75-90. [* Subject heading: early modern education and literacy; manuscript production; scribes and scribal practices; reading and readers (female, woman, women); authors and authorship *]

Burke, Victoria E. "Women and Early Seventeenth-Century Manuscript Culture: Four Miscellanies." The Seventeenth Century 12 (1997): 135-150. [* Subject heading: early modern education and literacy; manuscript production; scribes and scribal practices; reading and readers (female, woman, women); authors and authorship *]

Burke, Victoria E. "Women and Seventeenth-Century Manuscript Culture: Miscellanies, Commonplace Books, and Song Books Compiled by English and Scottish Women, 1600-1660." D.Phil. thesis, University of Oxford, 1997. [* Subject heading: early modern education and literacy; manuscript production; scribes and scribal practices; reading and readers (female, woman, women); authors and authorship *]

Burke, Victoria E., and Elizabeth Clarke. "Julia Palmer's 'Centuries': The Politics of Editing and Anthologizing Early Modern Women's Manuscript Compilations." In New Ways of Looking at Old Texts, III. Ed. W. Speed Hill. Papers of the Renaissance English Text Society, 1997-2001. Tempe, AZ: Renaissance English Text Society, with Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2004. Pp. 47-64. [* Subject heading: early modern education and literacy; manuscript production; scribes and scribal practices; reading and readers (female, woman, women); authors and authorship *]

Burke, Victoria E., and Jonathan Gibson, eds. Early Modern Women's Manuscript Writing: Selected Papers from the Trinity/Trent Colloquium. Aldershot, Hants.: Ashgate, 2004. [* Subject heading: early modern education and literacy; manuscript production; scribes and scribal practices; reading and readers (female, woman, women); authors and authorship *]

Burke, Victoria E., and Sarah C. Ross. "Elizabeth Middleton, John Bourchier, and the Compilation of Seventeenth-Century Religious Manuscripts." The Library: The Transactions of the Bibliographical Society 2.2 (June 2001): 131-160. [* Subject heading: early modern education and literacy; manuscript production; scribes and scribal practices; reading and readers (female, woman, women); authors and authorship *]

Camille, Michael. "Seeing and Reading: Some Visual Implications of Medieval Literacy and Illiteracy." Art History 8 (1985): 26-49. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination); marginalia *]

Catto, J. I., ed. The Early Oxford Schools. Vol. 1 of The History of the University of Oxford. Gen. Ed. T. H. Aston. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1984. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Cavallo, Guglielmo, and Roger Chartier, eds. A History of Reading in the West. Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press, 1999. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; modern education and literacy; reading and readers *]

Clanchy, M. T. From Memory to Written Record: England, 1066-1307. 2nd ed. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1993. [1st ed.: London: Edward Arnold, 1979.] [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; orality and literacy *]

Clogan, Paul M. "Literary Genres in a Medieval Textbook." Medievalia et Humanistica ns 11 (1982): 199-209. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; Liber Catonianus *]

Cobban, Alan B. Medieval Universities: Their Development and Organization. London: Methuen, 1975. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Cobban, Alan B. The Medieval English Universities: Oxford and Cambridge to c. 1500. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Coleman, Janet. English Literature in History 1350-1400: Medieval Writers and Readers. English Literature in History 1. London: Hutchinson Books, 1981. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; reading and readers *]

Coleman, Joyce. Public Reading and the Reading Public in Late Medieval England and France. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; reading and readers *]

Connolly, Margaret. "A London Widow's Psalter: Beatrice Cornburgh and Alexander Turnbull Library MS MSR-01." Trivium 31 (1999): 101-116. [Vol. 31 of Trivium is a special issue: "Sources, Exemplars, and Copy-Texts: Influence and Transmission; Essays from the Lampeter Conference of the Early Book Society, 1997," ed. William Marx.] [Re: Wellington, New Zealand, Alexander Turnbull Library, MS MSR-01. The manuscript has connections with John Shirley, for he was Beatrice's brother-in-law. Includes (as Fig. 9, on p. 115) a reproduction of fol. 5r of the manuscript.] [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; reading and readers (female, woman, women) *]

Courtenay, William J. Schools and Scholars in Fourteenth-Century England. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1988. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Courtney, William J. "The Effect of the Black Death on English Education." Speculum 55 (1980): 696-714. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Cressy, David. Literacy and the Social Order: Reading and Writing in Tudor and Stuart England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1980. [* Subject heading: history of the book; early printed books; early modern education and literacy; reading and readers *]

De Lubac, Henri. Medieval Exegesis. Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans Publishing, 1998. ["Examining the prominent commentators of the Middle Ages and their writings, de Lubac discusses the medieval approach to biblical interpretation and especially the practice of attempting to uncover the allegorical meanings of scripture" (Publisher's description).] [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; hermeneutics (techniques of interpretation) *]

Doyle, A. I. "English Books In and Out of Court from Edward III to Henry VII." In English Court Culture in the Later Middle Ages. Ed. V. J. Scattergood and J. W. Sherborne. New York: St. Martin's, 1983. Pp. 163-181. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; reading and readers; libraries and repositories (historical); provenance; manuscript ownership and collecting *]

Eden, Kathy. Hermeneutics and the Rhetorical Tradition: Chapters in the Ancient Legacy and its Humanist Reception. Yale Studies in Hermeneutics. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1997. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; hermeneutics (techniques of interpretation) *]

Edwards, Kathleen. The English Secular Cathedrals in the Middle Ages. 2nd ed. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1967. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Elliott, Ralph W. V. "Chaucer's Reading." In Chaucer's Mind and Art. Ed. A. C. Cawley. Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd, 1969. Pp. 46-68. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; reading and readers *]

Esposito, Mario. Latin Learning in Mediaeval Ireland. Collected Studies Series 285. London: Variorum Reprints, 1988. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Fentress, James, and Chris Wickham. Social Memory. New Perspectives on the Past. Oxford: Blackwell, 1992. [On "social memory" and tradition (oral memory, oral tradition), including those of class and gender groups in western societies, with particular chapters on "Medieval Memories" (using examples from "Song of Roland," Icelandic sagas, etc.), and another on "The Mafia and the Myth of Sicilian National Identity."] [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; orality and literacy *]

Finnegan, Ruth. Literacy and Orality. Oxford: Blackwell, 1988. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Fletcher, J. M. "The Faculty of Arts." In The Early Oxford Schools. Ed. J. I. Catto. Vol. 1 of The History of the University of Oxford. Gen. Ed. T. H. Aston. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1984. Pp. 369-399. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Flint, K. The Woman Reader. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; early modern education and literacy; reading and readers (female, woman, women) *]

Galbraith, V. H. "The Literacy of the Medieval English Kings." Proceedings of the British Academy 21 (1936): 201-238. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Gallacher, Patrick J., and Helen Damico, eds. Hermeneutics and Medieval Culture. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1989. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; hermeneutics (techniques of interpretation) *]

Gellrich, Jesse M. Discourse and Dominion in the Fourteenth Century: Oral Contexts of Writing in Philosophy, Politics, and Poetry. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995. ["This wide-ranging study of language and cultural change in fourteenth-century England argues that the influence of oral tradition is much more important to the advance of literacy than previously supposed. Informed by recent discussions in critical theory, philosophy, and anthropology, the book speaks directly to postmodern debate about the politics of historicism today."] [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Goody, Jack, ed. Literacy in Traditional Societies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1968. [* Subject heading: history of the book; medieval education and literacy; early modern education and literacy; reading and readers *]

Goody, Jack. The Logic of Writing and the Organization of Society: Studies in Literacy, Family, Culture and the State. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986. [* Subject heading: history of the book; medieval education and literacy; early modern education and literacy; reading and readers *]

Grafton, A. T. "Renaissance Readers and Ancient Texts." Renaissance Quarterly 38 (1985): 615-649. [* Subject heading: early modern education and literacy; reading and readers; the classics *]

Grafton, Anthony. "The Availability of Ancient Works." In The Cambridge History of Renaissance Philosophy. Ed. Charles B. Schmitt, Quentin Skinner, Eckhard Kessler, and Jill Kraye. Cambridge, New York, New Rochelle, Melbourne, and Sydney: Cambridge University Press, 1988. Pp. 767-791. [* Subject heading: early modern education and literacy; reading and readers; the classics *]

Grafton, Anthony, and Lisa Jardine. From Humanism to the Humanities: Education and the Liberal Arts in Fifteenth- and Sixteenth-Century Europe. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1986. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; early modern education and literacy; reading and readers; the classics *]

Green, D. H. "Orality and Reading: The State of Research in Medieval Studies." Speculum 65 (1990): 267-280. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; reading and readers *]

Grendler, Paul F. "Printing and Censorship." In The Cambridge History of Renaissance Philosophy. Ed. Charles B. Schmitt, Quentin Skinner, Eckhard Kessler, and Jill Kraye. Cambridge, New York, New Rochelle, Melbourne, and Sydney: Cambridge University Press, 1988. Pp. 25-53. [* Subject heading: early printed books; early modern education and literacy; reading and readers; history of publishing (censorship) *]

Griffiths, Paul J. Religious Reading: The Place of Reading in the Practice of Religion. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; hermeneutics (techniques of interpretation) *]

Hazelton, Richard. "Chaucer and Cato." Speculum 35 (1960): 357-380. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; Geoffrey Chaucer (reading, education) *]

Hazelton, Richard. "The Christianization of 'Cato': The Disticha Catonis in the Light of Late Mediaeval Commentaries." Mediaeval Studies 19 (1957): 157-173. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Hexter, Ralph J. Ovid and Medieval Schooling: Studies in Medieval School Commentaries on Ovid's "Ars Amatoria," "Epistulae ex Ponto," and "Epistulae Heroidum." Münchener Beiträge zur Mediävistik und Renaissance-Forschung 38. Munich: Arbeo-Gesellschaft, 1986. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Hoffman, Richard L. "The Influence of the Classics on Chaucer." In Companion to Chaucer Studies. Ed. Beryl Rowland. 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1979. Pp. 185-201. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; Geoffrey Chaucer (reading, education) *]

Hull, Suzanne W. Chaste, Silent and Obedient: English Books for Women 1475-1640. San Marino: Huntington Library, 1982. [* Subject heading: early modern education and literacy; reading and readers (female, woman, women) *]

Hunt, Tony. Teaching and Learning Latin in Thirteenth-Century England. Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell and Brewer, 1991. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Ijsewijn, Jozef, and Jacques Paquet, eds. The Universities in the Late Middle Ages. Mediaevalia Lovaniensia Series 1, Studia 6. Louvain: Leuven University Press, 1978. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Jones, Leslie W. "The Influence of Cassiodorus on Medieval Culture." Speculum 20 (1945): 433-442. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Ker, Neil R. "Oxford College Libraries before 1500." In The Universities in the Late Middle Ages. Ed. Jozef Ijsewijn and Jacques Paquet. Mediaevalia Lovaniensia Series 1, Studia 6. Louvain: Leuven University Press, 1978. Pp. 293-311. [The book owning institutions at Oxford University before 1500 were the ten secular colleges, the religious colleges, the friaries and other church institutions. Only the secular colleges still exist, and Queen's especially managed to keep a number of its medieval MSS. Thus we have a selection of library books to examine which may have been kept as reference books in the library or lent out in electione sociorum for a year or longer. The new colleges received foundation grants of books from various sources which were meant, if nothing else, to make a room look like it was filled with books. A good many humanistic books, and some more lavish editions, were donated to the library through the times of the big grants. During this same period, book purchases by the universities fell off sharply. Printed books began to displace the MS collections after 1500.] [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Kerby-Fulton, Kathryn, and Steven Justice. "Langlandian Reading Circles and the Civil Service in London and Dublin, 1380-1427." New Medieval Literatures 1 (1997): ??. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; reading and readers; William Langland *]

Kibre, Pearl. Scholarly Privileges in the Middle Ages. Mediaeval Academy Books 72. Cambridge, MA: Mediaeval Academy of America, 1962. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Kibre, Pearl. The Nations in the Mediaeval Universities. Mediaeval Academy of America Publications 49. Cambridge, MA: Mediaeval Academy of America, 1948. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Le Goff, Jacques. Les intellectuels au Moyen Age. Paris: Seuil, 1985. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Leclercq, Jean. "The Exposition and Exegesis of Scripture, 2: From Gregory the Great to St. Bernard." In The Cambridge History of the Bible, Vol. 2: The West from the Fathers to the Reformation. Ed. G. W. H. Lampe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1969. Pp. 183-197. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; hermeneutics (techniques of interpretation) *]

Lerer, Seth. Literacy and Power in Anglo-Saxon Literature. Regents Studies in Medieval Culture. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1991. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Lewry, P. Osmund. "Grammar, Logic and Rhetoric 1220-1320." In The Early Oxford Schools. Ed. J. I. Catto. Vol. 1 of The History of the University of Oxford. Gen. Ed. T. H. Aston. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1984. Pp. 401-433. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Lowes, John Livingstone. Chaucer and the Development of his Genius. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1934. [Several lectures, the third of which is on Chaucer and his reading.] [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; Geoffrey Chaucer (reading, education) *]

McFarlane, K. B. The Nobility of Later Medieval England. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1978. [Includes sections on literacy and on literary patronage, etc.] [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; manuscript production; reading and readers (patronage); manuscript ownership and collecting; provenance *]

McKitterick, Rosamond, ed. The Uses of Literacy in Early Medieval Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Meale, Carol M., and Julia Boffey. "Gentlewomen's Reading." In The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain, Vol. 3: 1400-1557. Ed. Lotte Hellinga and J. B. Trapp. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. Pp. ??. [On female owners of manuscripts.] [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; reading and readers (female, woman, women) *]

Miner, J[ohn] N. "The Teaching of Latin in Later Medieval England." Mediaeval Studies 23 (1961): 1-20. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Miner, John N. The Grammer Schools of Medieval England: A. F. Leach in Historiographical Perspective. Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1989. [Attempts to rehabilitate Leach who, at the turn of the century, had presented arguments that there had been secular schools in medieval England--that the monks were not the only ones operating schools, but there were some run by secular clerics as well.] [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Moran, Jo Ann Hoeppner. The Growth of English Schooling, 1340-1548: Learning, Literacy, and Laicization in Pre-Reformation York Diocese. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1985. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Mostert, Marco, ed. New Approaches to Medieval Communication. Utrecht Studies in Medieval Literacy 1. Turnhout: Brepols, 1999. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Mostert, Marco, ed. Organizing the Written Word: Scripts, Manuscripts and Texts: Proceedings of the First Utrecht Symposium on Medieval Literacy, 5-7 June 1997. Utrecht Studies in Medieval Literacy 2. Turnhout: Brepols, 2000. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Murphy, James J. "Rhetoric in Fourteenth-Century Oxford." Medium Ævum 34 (1965): 1-20. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

O'Keeffe, Katherine O'Brien. Visible Song: Transitional Literacy in Old English Verse. Cambridge Studies in Anglo-Saxon England 4. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Oldfather, William Abbott. "New Manuscript Material for the Study of Avianus." Transactions and Proceedings of the American Philological Association 42 (1911): 105-121. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Ong, Walter J., SJ. Orality and Literacy: The Technologizing of the Word. New Accents. London: Routledge, 1982. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Orme, Nicholas. "Chaucer and Education." Chaucer Review 16 (1981): 38-59. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; Geoffrey Chaucer (reading, education) *]

Orme, Nicholas. "Langland and Education." History of Education 11 (1982): 251-266. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; William Langland *]

Orme, Nicholas. "Schoolmasters, 1307-1509." In Profession, Vocation, and Culture in Later Medieval England: Essays Dedicated to the Memory of A. R. Myers. Ed. Cecil H. Clough. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1982. Pp. 218-241. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Orme, Nicholas. Education in the West of England, 1066-1548. Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 1976. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Orme, Nicholas. English Schools in the Middle Ages. London: Methuen, 1973. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Parkes, M. B. "The Literacy of the Laity." In The Mediaeval World. Vol. 3 of Literature and Western Civilization. Ed. David Daiches and Anthony Thorlby. London: Aldus Books, 1973. Pp. 555-577. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Pratt, Robert A. "Chaucer and the Hand that Fed Him." Speculum 41 (1966): 619-642. [Chaucer's indebtedness to the Friars for some of his material: mendicant preaching handbooks, like the Communiloquium of John of Wales. (Article in need of revision now, but still basically useful.)] [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; Geoffrey Chaucer (reading, education) *]

Pratt, Robert A. "Chaucer's Claudian." Speculum 22 (1947): 419-429. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; Geoffrey Chaucer (reading, education) *]

Pratt, Robert A. "Karl Young's Work on the Learning of Chaucer." In A Memoir of Karl Young. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1946. Pp. 45-56. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; Geoffrey Chaucer (reading, education) *]

Pratt, Robert A. "The Importance of Manuscripts for the Study of Medieval Education, as Revealed by the Learning of Chaucer." In Progress of Medieval and Renaissance Studies in the United States and Canada, Bulletin no. 20. Ed. S. Harrison Thomson. Boulder: University of Colorado, 1949. Pp. 43-51. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Pucci, Joseph. The Full-Knowing Reader: Allusion and the Power of the Reader in the Western Literary Tradition. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1998. [* Subject heading: reading and readers *]

Rashdall, Hastings. The Universities of Europe in the Middle Ages. 2nd ed. Ed. F. M. Powicke and A. B. Emden. 3 Vols. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1936. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Reynolds, Suzanne. Medieval Reading: Grammar, Rhetoric and the Classical Text. Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature 27. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; reading and readers *]

Rosenthal, J. T. "English Medieval Education since 1970--So Near and Yet so Far." History of Education Quarterly 22 (1982): 499-511. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Saenger, Paul. "Silent Reading: Its Impact on Late Medieval Script and Society." Viator 13 (1982): 367-414. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; reading and readers *]

Saenger, Paul. Space between Words: The Origins of Silent Reading. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1997. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; reading and readers *]

Sanford, Eva Matthews. "The Use of Classical Latin Authors in the Libri Manuales." Transactions and Proceedings of the American Philological Association 55 (1924): 190-248. [Includes a brief catalogue of over 400 medieval MSS (with an index) of Classical and Pseudo-classical works: Pratt cited this article as a useful guide to which works tended to appear together in the same manuscripts.] [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Sebastian, Harry Francis. "William of Wheteley's (fl. 1309-1316) Commentary on the Pseudo-Boethius' Tractate De disciplina scolarium and Medieval Grammar School Education." Diss. Columbia, 1970. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Sheehan, M. W. "The Religious Orders 1220-1370." In The Early Oxford Schools. Ed. J. I. Catto. Vol. 1 of The History of the University of Oxford. Gen. Ed. T. H. Aston. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1984. Pp. 193-223. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Smalley, Beryl. "The Exposition and Exegesis of Scripture, 3: The Bible in the Medieval Schools." In The Cambridge History of the Bible, Vol. 2: The West from the Fathers to the Reformation. Ed. G. W. H. Lampe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1969. Pp. 197-220. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; hermeneutics (techniques of interpretation) *]

Smith, Lesley, and Jane H. M. Taylor, eds. Women, the Book, and the Worldly. Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell and Brewer, 1995. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; reading and readers (female, woman, women) *]

Southern, R. W. (Sir). "From Schools to University." In The Early Oxford Schools. Ed. J. I. Catto. Vol. 1 of The History of the University of Oxford. Gen. Ed. T. H. Aston. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1984. Pp. 1-36. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Stevenson, W. H. "The Introduction of English as the Vehicle of Instruction in English Schools." In An English Miscellany, Presented to Dr. [F. J.] Furnivall in Honour of his Seventy-Fifth Birthday. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1901. Pp. 421-429. [Rpt. New York: B. Blom, 1969.] [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Stock, Brian. Listening for the Text: On the Uses of the Past. Parallax: Re-visions of Culture and Society. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1989. ["Brian Stock ponders the creation of the past as text, considering equally the past that is written about and the writing that brings it to life. Listening for a wide range of medieval and modern texts, he shows how the growth of interest in language in the Middle Ages forms the background to the contemporary study of oral and literate culture."] [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Stock, Brian. The Implications of Literacy: Written Language and Models of Interpretation in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1983. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; hermeneutics (techniques of interpretation) *]

Strohm, Paul. "Jean of Angoulême: A Fifteenth Century Reader of Chaucer." Neuphilologische Mitteilungen 72 (1971): 69-76. [On MS. Paris, Bibliothèque nationale, Fonds angl. 39; a copy of Chaucer made for Jean of Angoulême (brother of Charles d'Orleans and, like his brother, sometime prisoner in England), which, in his selection of tales and in his marginal notes, indicates something of the 15th c. taste. Chaucer's "Knight's Tale" is labeled "extremely good"; tales of Squire and Canon's Yeoman both marked "absurd"; "Sir Thopas" and "Monk's Tale" curtailed (Jean, presumably, did not appreciate the humour of the first, and the second is marked "too sad"). "Melibee" and "Parson's Tale" are missing, but not because Jean had no taste for them: he owned a copy of the Somme des Vices et des Vertus which is marked up appreciatively. Pp. 74-76 include some comments on John Shirley as a reader/anthologizer of Chaucer, quoting one of his rubrics (to the Canterbury Tales) from Harley 7333 (on p. 75). Conclusion: Jean's tastes and appreciation of Chaucer far from the modern, but this should not discourage us since "even in his own day Chaucer must have had a mixed audience with mixed reasons for enjoying his work" (p. 76).] [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; reading and readers *]

Sturges, Robert S. Medieval Interpretation: Models of Reading in Literary Narrative, 1100-1500. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 1991. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; hermeneutics (techniques of interpretation) *]

Taylor, Andrew. "Into his Secret Chamber: Reading and Privacy in Late Medieval England." In The Practice and Representation of Reading in England. Ed. James Raven, Helen Small, and Naomi Tadmor. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996. Pp. 41-61. [On "private" forms of reading in the later Middle Ages (such as the meditational techniques incorporated into the Meditationes vitae Christi: reading as a form of prayer, etc.), including an account of Margaret Beaufort's devotional practices and of her collection of devotional texts.] [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; reading and readers *]

Taylor, Jane, and Lesley Smith. Women and the Book: Assessing the Visual Evidence. British Library Studies in Medieval Culture. London: British Library, 1997. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy (female, woman, women) *]

Thomas, Paul R. "Cato on Chauntecleer: Chaucer's Sophisticated Audience." Neophilologus 72 (1988): 278-283. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; reading and readers *]

Waddell, Helen. The Wandering Scholars. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1989. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Wagner, David L., ed. The Seven Liberal Arts in the Middle Ages. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1984. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Weisheipl, J. A. "Curriculum of the Faculty of Arts at Oxford in the Early Fourteenth Century." Mediaeval Studies 26 (1964): 143-185. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Weisheipl, J. A. "Developments in the Arts Curriculum at Oxford in the Early Fourteenth Century." Mediaeval Studies 28 (1966): 151-175. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Wenzel, Siegfried. "Two Notes on Chaucer and Grosseteste." Notes and Queries 215 (1970): 449-451. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy *]

Windeatt, Barry A. "Julian of Norwich and her Audience." RES ns 28 (1977): 1-17. [* Subject heading: medieval education and literacy; reading and readers *]



Bibliography: [ Some basic resources ] | [ General bibliography ] | [ History of the book ] | [ Literacy and education, medieval and early modern (readers and reading) ] | [ Archival research ] | [ Forgeries / bibliographic fraud ] | [ Dictionaries (historical) ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: production ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: catalogues ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: facsimiles ] | [ Diplomatics: the study of historical documents ] | [ Printing, history of ] | [ Publishing, history of ] | [ Libraries and repositories, history of; book collecting ] | [ Manuscript culture ] | [ Manuscript culture: patronage ] | [ Manuscripts: codicology ] | [ Manuscripts: paleography ] | [ Manuscript production ] | [ Manuscript production: scribes and scribal practices ] | [ Manuscript production: decoration and illustration ] | [ Manuscript production: material culture (paper, bindings, etc.) ] | [ Manuscripts: catalogues and finding aids ] | [ Manuscripts: facsimiles and facsimile editions ] | [ Sigillography (the study of seals) ] | [ Textual criticism and editing ] | [ Keyword search of entire bibliography ]


[Button: Back to Main page] [Button: Course Notes] [Button: People]
[Button: Bibliography] [Button: Links] [Button: Site Index]


© 1998 Stephen R. Reimer
English; University of Alberta; Edmonton, Canada
All rights reserved.
Created: 29 Oct. 1998; Last revised: 20 June 2009

email: Stephen.Reimer@UAlberta.Ca
URL: http://www.ualberta.ca/~sreimer/ms-course.htm