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Manuscript Studies
Medieval and Early Modern

Bibliography: History of the Book


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Adams, Thomas R., and Nicolas Barker. "A New Model for the Study of the Book." In A Potencie of Life: Books in Society; The Clark Lectures, 1986-1987. Ed. Nicolas Barker. The British Library Studies in the History of the Book. London: British Library, 1993. Pp. 5-43. [Whereas the historians would make the new field of the history of the book a history of people in relation to books (relegating the history of the book to a branch of social history, and thus generally dismissing and ignoring as irrelevant the work of bibliographers during the last hundred years), Adams and Barker insist that the physical object of the book--its publication, manufacturing, distribution, reception and survival--should be central to this field.] [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Allen, Charlotte. "Indecent Disposal." Lingua Franca 5.4 (May-June 1995): 44-53. [An expression of outrage aimed at Guaranteed Destruction Inc. of New Jersey, which pulps and recycles books.] [* Subject heading: history of the book; "death" of the book *]

Alston, R. C., ed. Order and Connexion: Studies in Bibliography and Book History; Selected Papers from the Munby Seminar, Cambridge, July 1994. Cambridge, and Rochester, NY: D. S. Brewer / Boydell and Brewer, 1997. [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Avrin, Leila. Scribes, Script, and Books: The Book Arts from Antiquity to the Renaissance. Illus. Malla Carl and Noah Ophir. Chicago: American Library Association; London: The British Library, 1991. [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Barker, Nicolas. Form and Meaning in the History of the Book. The British Library Studies in the History of the Book. London: British Library, 2003. [* Subject heading: history of the book; material production (typography) *]

Bell, William, ed. Where is Book History?: Essays in the Emergence of a Discipline. Fwd. Roger Chartier. London: British Library, 2002. [* Subject heading: history of the book (history of the discipline) *]

Birkerts, Sven. "The Fate of the Book." In Tolstoy's Dictaphone. Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 1996. Pp. 189-199 [* Subject heading: history of the book; "death" of the book *]

Birkerts, Sven. The Gutenberg Elegies: The Fate of Reading in an Electronic Age. London and Boston: Faber and Faber, 1994. [* Subject heading: history of the book; "death" of the book *]

Boffey, Julia. Manuscript and Print in London c.1475-1530. London: British Library, 2012. [* Subject heading: History of the book; printing, history of; early printing culture; relationship of printed books to manuscripts; London, book industries and trade; intellectual life *]

Book History 1 (1998)-. [Annual: journal of the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing (SHARP).] [* Subject heading: history of the book (journals); authors and authorship; reading and readers *]

Braswell, Laurel Nichols. Western Manuscripts from Classical Antiquity to the Renaissance: A Handbook. New York and London: Garland Publishing, 1981. [* Subject heading: history of the book; manuscript production; paleography (history of handwriting); manuscripts (codicological study); codicology *]

The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain. Gen. ed. Lotte Hellinga. 7 vols. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998-. [Publisher's description: "The history of the book offers a distinctive form of access to the ways in which human beings have sought to give meaning to their own and others' lives. Our knowledge of the past derives mainly from texts. Landscape, architecture, sculpture, painting and the decorative arts have their stories to tell and may themselves be construed as texts; but oral tradition, manuscripts, printed books, and those other forms of inscription and incision such as maps, music and graphic images have a power to report even more directly on human experience and the events and thoughts which shaped it. The seven volumes of the History of the Book in Britain will help explain how these texts were created, why they took the forms they did, their relations with other media, and what influence they had on the minds and actions of those who heard, read or viewed them. Its range, too--in time, place and the great diversity of the conditions of text production, including reception--challenges any attempt to define its limits and give an account adequate to its complexity. It addresses, whether by period, country, genre or technology, widely disparate fields of enquiry, each of which demands and attracts its own forms of scholarship. The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain seeks to represent much of that variety. The volumes investigate the creation, material production, dissemination and reception of texts, effectively plotting the intellectual history of Britain."] [Vol. 1. 400-1100, ed. Richard Gameson; Vol. 2. 1100-1400, ed. Nigel J. Morgan and Rodney M. Thomson; Vol. 3. 1400-1557, ed. Lotte Hellinga and J. B. Trapp; Vol. 4. 1557-1695, ed. John Barnard and D. F. McKenzie, with the assistance of Maureen Bell; Vol. 5. 1695-1830, ed. Michael F. Suarez and Michael L. Turner; Vol. 6. 1830-1914, ed. David McKitterick; Vol. 7. The twentieth century, ed. Andrew Nash, Claire Squires and I. R. Willison.] [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Chartier, Roger. The Author's Hand and the Printer's Mind. Trans. Lydia G. Cochrane. Cambridge: Polity Press, 2014. [Publisher's description: "In Early Modern Europe the first readers of a book were not those who bought it. They were the scribes who copied the author's or translator's manuscript, the censors who licensed it, the publisher who decided to put this title in his catalogue, the copy editor who prepared the text for the press, divided it and added punctuation, the typesetters who composed the pages of the book, and the proof reader who corrected them. The author's hand cannot be separated from the printers' mind. This book is devoted to the process of publication of the works that framed their readers' representations of the past or of the world. Linking cultural history, textual criticism and bibliographical studies, dealing with canonical works--like Cervantes' Don Quixote or Shakespeare's plays--as well as lesser known texts, Roger Chartier identifies the fundamental discontinuities that transformed the circulation of the written word between the invention of printing and the definition, three centuries later, of what we call 'literature.'"] [Contents: Part 1: The past in the present -- Listen to the dead with your eyes -- History: reading time -- History and social science: a return to Braudel. Part 2: What is a book? -- The powers of print -- The author's hand -- Pauses and pitches -- Translation. Part 3: Texts and meanings -- Memory and writing -- Paratext and preliminaries -- Publishing Cervantes -- Publishing Shakespeare -- The time of the work.] [* Subject heading: history of the book; readers and reading; censorship; early modern books *]

Chartier, Roger, ed. The Culture of Print: Power and the Uses of Print in Early Modern Europe. Trans. Lydia G. Cochrane. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1987. [On the cultural transformation brought about by the invention of the printing press.] [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Clement, Richard W. "A Survey of Antique, Medieval, and Renaissance Book Production." In Art into Life: Collected Papers from the Kresge Art Museum Medieval Symposia. Ed. Carol Garrett Fisher and Kathleen L. Scott. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 1995. Pp. 9-28. [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

A Companion to the History of the Book. Ed. Simon Eliot and Jonathan Rose. Oxford, and Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing. 2007. [Publisher's description: "From the early Sumerian clay tablet through to the emergence of the electronic text, this Blackwell Companion provides a continuous and coherent account of the history of the book."] [* Subject heading: history of the book; history of publishing; reading and readers *]

Cope, Bill, and Angus Phillips, eds. The Future of the Book in the Digital Age. Oxford: Chandos, 2006. [* Subject heading: history of the book; "death" of the book; textual criticism and editing (use of computers) *]

Dahl, Svend. Dahl's History of the Book. 3rd English ed.; rev. by Bill [William A.] Katz. History of the Book 2. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow Press, 1995. [The first Danish edition was published in the 1950s, and many of the examples used are from Danish printing history. Contents: The Power of the Scribes -- Greece: The Classical Heritage -- The Romans To Early Christians -- The Dark Ages -- Middle Ages to the Renaissance -- Printing and the Renaissance -- Publishing: Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries -- The Great Leap Forward: Printing and Publishing from 1800 to 1920 -- The Twentieth Century and Beyond -- Added Reading A: General Histories and Bibliographies -- Added Reading B: Scribes to Printers -- Added Reading C: Gutenberg to the Twenty-first Century.] [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Darnton, Robert. "What is the History of Books?" Daedalus 111 (1982): 65-83. [This essay has been reprinted a number of times, including as part of Reading in America: Literature and Social History, ed. Cathy N. Davidson (Baltimore and London: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1989).] [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Davidson, Cathy N. "Introduction: Toward a History of Books and Readers." In Reading in America: Literature and Social History. Ed. Cathy N. Davidson. Baltimore and London: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1989. Pp. 1-26. [* Subject heading: history of the book; reading and readers *]

Delaissé, L. "Towards a History of the Medieval Book." Divinitas 11 (1967): 423-435. [* Subject heading: history of the book; manuscript culture; manuscript production *]

Diringer, David. The Book Before Printing: Ancient, Medieval, and Oriental. London: Hutchinson's Scientific and Technical Publications, 1953. Reprint: New York: Dover, 1982. [* Subject heading: history of the book; manuscript production; material production (bookbinding); material production (paper, parchment, vellum); material production (writing implements); page layout and design *]

Donaldson, Ian. "The Destruction of the Book." Book History 1 (1998): 1-10. [Offers a response to Charlotte Allen, "Indecent Disposal," declaring that the demise of the book (individual or collective) is not horrific, though it remains unlikely that we will see the forecast "end" of the book anytime soon. (I am reminded of an essay entitled "Too Many Books," written early in the twentieth century, though I cannot remember the author's name, which celebrated the burning of the library at Alexandria as a great boon to mankind.)] [* Subject heading: history of the book; "death" of the book *]

Dupont, Florence. The Invention of Literature: From Greek Intoxication to the Latin Book. Trans. Janet Lloyd. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999. [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Edwards, A. S. G. "Books and Manuscripts." In The Oxford Handbook of Medieval Literature in English. Ed. Elaine M. Treharne and Greg Walker. Oxford Handbooks of Literature. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. Pp. 17-32. [* Subject Heading: History of the Book; Middle Ages; paleography; codicology; manuscript studies *]

Edwards, A. S. G., and Vincent Gillespie, eds. The English Medieval Book: Studies in Memory of Jeremy Griffiths. British Library Studies in the History of the Book. London: British Library, 2000. [* Subject heading: history of the Book; manuscripts; medieval; England; book industries and trade *]

Feather, John. "The Book in History and the History of the Book." In The History of Books and Libraries: Two Views. Ed. John Y. Cole. Washington, DC: Library of Congress, 1986. Pp. 1-16. [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Feather, John. "The History of Books as a Field of Study: A Review Essay." The Journal of Library History 17 (1982): 463-467. [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Feather, John. A Dictionary of Book History. New York: Oxford University Press; London: Croom Helm, 1986. [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Febvre, Lucien, and Henri-Jean Martin. The Coming of the Book: The Impact of Printing, 1450-1800. Trans. David Gerard. The Foundations of History Library. London: NLB, 1976. [Rpt. London: Verso, 1990.] [* Subject heading: history of the book; early printed books; incunabula; history of printing *]

Finkelstein, David, and Alistair McCleery, eds. The Book History Reader. London and New York: Routledge, 2002. [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Finkelstein, David, and Alistair McCleery. An Introduction to Book History. London and New York: Routledge, 2005. [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Ganz, Peter, ed. The Role of the Book in Medieval Culture: Proceedings of the Oxford International Symposium, 26 September - 1 October 1982. 2 vols. Bibliologia 3 and 4. Turnhout: Brepols, 1986. [* Subject heading: history of the book; medieval education and literacy; reading and readers *]

Gillespie, Vincent, and Susan Power, eds. A Companion to the Early Printed Book in Britain, 1476-1558. Cambridge, and Rochester, NY: D. S. Brewer / Boydell and Brewer, 2014. [Publisher's description: "The history of the book is now recognized as a field of central importance for understanding the cultural changes that swept through Tudor England. This companion aims to provide a comprehensive guide to the issues relevant to the early printed book, covering the significant cultural, social and technological developments from 1476 (the introduction of printing to England) to 1558 (the death of Mary Tudor). Divided into thematic sections (the printed book trade; the book as artefact; patrons, purchasers and producers; and the cultural capital of print), it considers the social, historical, and cultural context of the rise of print, with the problems as well as advantages of the transmission from manuscript to print; the printers of the period; the significant Latin trade and its effect on the English market; paper, types, bindings, and woodcuts and other decorative features which create the packaged book; and the main sponsors and consumers of the printed book: merchants, the lay clientele, secular and religious clergy, and the two Universities, as well as secular colleges and chantries. Further topics addressed include humanism, women translators, and the role of censorship and the continuity of Catholic publishing from that time. The book is completed with a chronology and detailed indices."] [Contents: Introduction, Vincent Gillespie; "From Manuscript to Print: Continuity and Change," Julia Boffey; "Printers, Publishers and Promoters to 1558," Tamara Atkin and A. S. G. Edwards; "The Latin Trade in England and Abroad," Alan Coates; "Materials: Paper and Type," Pamela Robinson; "Bookbinding and Early Printing in England," Alexandra Gillespie; "Woodcuts and Decorative Techniques," Martha W. Driver; "Merchants," Anne F. Sutton; "The Laity," Mary C. Erler; "The Secular Clergy," Susan Powell; "The Regular Clergy," James G. Clark; "Universities, Colleges and Chantries," James Willoughby; "Humanism and Printing," Daniel Wakelin; "Women Translators and the Early Printed Book," Brenda M. Hosington; "The Printed Book Trade in response to Luther: English Books Printed Abroad," Andrew Hope; "Thomas More, Print and the Idea of Censorship," Thomas Betteridge; "Catholicism, the Printed Book and the Marian Restoration," Lucy Kostyanovsky.] [* Subject heading: history of the book; early printed books: production; incunabula; book illustration (woodcuts); material production (bookbinding, paper); reading and readers (patronage); relationship of manuscripts and books *]

Gilmont, Jean-François, ed. The Reformation and the Book. Trans. Karin Maag. Aldershot, Hants., and Brookfield, VT: Ashgate Publishing, 1998. [A collection of essays exploring the connections between the invention of printing and the Protestant Reformation. The individual sections cover most of Europe, country by country; some of the sections are on individual cities. Includes Peter G. Bietenholz, "Books and the English Reformation Prior to 1558."] [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Hanna, Ralph, III. Introducing English Medieval Book History: Manuscripts, their Producers and their Readers. Exeter Medieval Texts and Studies. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2013. [Publisher's description: "This book offers an introduction to medieval English book-history through a sequence of exemplary analyses of commonplace book-historical problems. Rather than focus on bibliographical particulars, the volume considers a variety of ways in which scholars use manuscripts to discuss book culture, and it provides a wide-ranging introductory bibliography to aid in the study. All the essays try to suggest how the study of surviving medieval books might be useful in considering medieval literary culture more generally. Subjects covered include authorship, genre, discontinuous production, scribal individuality and community, the history of libraries and the history of book provenance."] [* Subject Heading: history of the book (medieval); manuscript culture; manuscript production; reading and readers *]

Harthan, John. The History of the Illustrated Book: The Western Tradition. London: Thames and Hudson, 1981. [* Subject heading: history of the book; book illustration *]

Hindman, Sandra, ed. The Early Illustrated Book: Essays in Honor of Lessing J. Rosenwald. Washington, DC: Library of Congress, 1982. [A collection of papers in celebration of the Rosenwald Collection of Illustrated Books donated to the Library of Congress; the collection includes some illuminated medieval manuscripts and is especially strong in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Dutch and Flemish incunabula and early printed books.] [* Subject heading: history of the book; early printed books; incunabula; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination); book illustration *]

Hindman, Sandra, ed. Printing the Written Word: The Social History of Books, circa 1450-1520. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1991. [* Subject heading: history of the book; history of printing *]

The History of the Book in the West (A Library of Critical Essays), Vol. 1: 400 A.D.-1455. Ed. Jane Roberts and Pamela Robinson. Aldershot, Hants., and Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing, 2010. [Publisher's description: "This selection of papers by major scholars introduces students to the history of the book in the West from late Antiquity to the publication of the Gutenberg Bible and the beginning of the print revolution. The collection opens with wide-ranging papers on handwriting and the physical make-up of the book. In the second group of papers the emphasis is on the 'look' of the book, complemented by a third group dealing with scribes, readers and the availability of books."] [Contents: "The history of the manuscript book, 400 A.D.-1455: An overview." Part 1: Introductory. "Aspects of palaeography," T. Julian Brown; "The bibliography of the manuscript-book," G. S. Ivy. Part 2: The Look of the Book. "From 'above top line' to 'below top line': A change in scribal practice," N. R. Ker; "The circulation of glossed books of the Bible," Christopher de Hamel; "The influence of the concepts of ordinatio and compilatio on the development of the book," M. B. Parkes; "The 'booklet': A self-contained unit in composite manuscripts," P. R. Robinson; "Describing medieval bookbindings," Graham Pollard. Part 3: Copying, Dissemination and Readership. "The preconditions for Caroline minuscule," David Ganz; "How fast did scribes write?: Evidence from Romanesque manuscripts," Michael Gullick; "French Bibles c. 1200-30: A new look at the origin of the Paris Bible," Laura Light; "University jurisdiction over the booktrade: The family of Guillaume de Sens," R. H. and M. A. Rouse; "Printing, mass communication, and religious reformation: The Middle Ages and after," David d'Avray; "The Book of Hours," Roger S. Wieck; "The production of copies of the Canterbury Tales and the Confessio Amantis in the early fifteenth century," A. I. Doyle and M. B. Parkes; "A new type of book for a new type of reader: The emergence of paper in vernacular book production," Erik Kwakkel; "Vespasiano da Bisticci as producer of classical manuscripts in fifteenth-century Florence," Albinia C. de la Mare; "Literacy, reading and writing in the medieval West," Charles F. Briggs; "Regulations for the operation of a medieval library," Robert D. Taylor-Vaisey.] [* Subject heading: history of the book; manuscript culture; codicology; manuscript production; transmission of texts; Geoffrey Chaucer; John Gower; education and literacy; readers and reading *]

The History of the Book in the West (A Library of Critical Essays), Vol. 2: 1455-1700. Ed. Ian Gadd. Aldershot, Hants., and Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing, 2010. [Publisher's description: "Beginning with one of the crucial technological breakthroughs of Western history--the development of moveable type by Johann Gutenberg--The History of the Book in the West 1455-1700 covers the period that saw the growth and consolidation of the printed book as a significant feature of Western European culture and society. The volume collects together seventeen key articles, written by leading scholars during the past five decades, that together survey a wide range of topics, such as typography, economics, regulation, bookselling, and reading practices. Books, whether printed or in manuscript, played a major role in the religious, political, and intellectual upheavals of the period, and understanding how books were made, distributed, and encountered provides valuable new insights into the history of Western Europe in the fifteenth, sixteenth, and seventeenth centuries."] [Contents: Introduction. Part 1: Typography. "Temporary matrices and elemental punches in Gutenberg's DK type," Blaise Agüera y Arcas; "The Aldine italic," Nicolas Barker. Part 2: The Impact of Print. "Some conjectures about the impact of printing on Western society and thought: A preliminary report," Elizabeth L. Eisenstein; "The importance of being printed," Anthony T. Grafton; "The Roman Inquisition and the Venetian press 1540-1605," Paul F. Grendler; "Printing at the dawn of the sixteenth century," Jean-François Gilmont; "The Reformation and the book: A reconsideration," Andrew Pettegree and Matthew Hall; "Orality lost: Text and voice in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries," Roger Chartier. Part 3: Practice. "A trade union in sixteenth-century France," Natalie Zemon Davis; "Inquisitional trials and printing-workers in sixteenth-century Spain," Clive Griffin; "Printers of the mind: Some notes on bibliographical theories and printing-house practices," D. F. McKenzie. Part 4: Selling. "'Omnium totius orbis emporiorum compendium': The Frankfurt book fair in the early modern period," John L. Flood; "The market for scholarly books and conceptions of genre in Northern Europe, 1570-1630," Ian Maclean; "Bibliographical note: The survival and loss rates of Psalms, ABCs, Psalters and Primers from the Stationers' stock 1660-1700," John Barnard. Part 5: Reading. "The impact of the early printed page on the history of reading," Paul Saenger; "'Studied for action': How Gabriel Harvey read his Livy," Lisa Jardine and Anthony Grafton; "Books as totems in seventeenth-century England and New England," David Cressy.] [* Subject heading: history of the book; manuscript culture; early printed books and incunabula; readers and reading *]

Hodnett, Edward. Five Centuries of English Book Illustration. Aldershot, Hants.: Scolar Press, 1988. [* Subject heading: history of the book; early printed books: production; incunabula; book illustration *]

Howard, Nicole. The Book: The Life Story of Technology. Greenwood Technographies. Westport, CN: Greenwood Press, 2005. [Contents: Ancestors: Books before print -- Infancy: The earliest printed books, 1450-1500 -- Youth: Books in the sixteenth century -- Adulthood: Early-modern books, 1600-1800 -- Maturity: Books in the age of automation, 1800-1900 -- The future of books: Twentieth century and beyond.] [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Isaac, Peter, and Barry McKay, eds. The Reach of Print: Making, Selling and Using Books. Print Network. Winchester: St. Paul's Bibliographies; New Castle, DE: Oak Knoll Books, 1998. [Papers from the 1997 conference on Book Trade History.] [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Jones, Philip Henry, and Eiluned Rees, eds. A Nation and its Books: A History of the Book in Wales. Aberystwyth: National Library of Wales, in association with the Aberystwyth Centre for the Book, 1998. [* Subject heading: history of the book; literary transmission *]

Journal of the Early Book Society 1 (1997)-. [Quarterly: journal of the Early Book Society.] [* Subject heading: manuscripts (journals); early printed books (journals); incunabula; manuscripts (codicological study) *]

Kilgour, Frederick G. The Evolution of the Book. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1998. [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Lyons, Martyn. A History of Reading and Writing in the Western World. Basingstoke, Hants., and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. [Publisher's description: "Martyn Lyons surveys the changing relationships enjoyed by men and women with the written word, from early times to the present day. He provides a highly-readable account of the social history of reading and writing, relating it to key historical moments such as the Renaissance, the Reformation and the Enlightenment. Offering a fresh history centred on the reactions and experiences of ordinary readers and writers, Lyons deals with key turning points that occurred throughout the centuries, such as the invention of the codex, the transition from scribal to print culture, the reading revolution and the industrialisation of the book. Tracing the major historical developments across Europe and North America which revolutionised our relationship with texts, this book provides an engaging and invaluable overview of the history of scribal and print culture."] [Contents: What is the history of reading and writing? -- Reading and writing in the ancient and medieval world -- Was there a printing revolution? -- Print and the Protestant Reformation -- Renaissance books and humanist readers -- Print and popular culture -- The rise of literacy in the early modern West, c. 1600-c.1800 -- Censorship and the reading public in pre-revolutionary France -- The reading fever, 1750-1830 -- The age of the mass reading public -- New readers and reading cultures -- The democratisation of writing, 1800 to the present -- Readers and writers in the digital age.] [* Subject heading: history of the book; literacy and education, medieval and early modern (readers and reading); history of reading; relation of manuscripts and printed books *]

Maclean, Ian. Learning and the Market Place: Essays in the History of the Early Modern Book. Library of the Written Word 9. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2009. [Contents: The market for scholarly books and conceptions of genre in Northern Europe, 1570-1630 -- The readership of philosophical fictions in France in the sixteenth century: the bibliographical evidence -- Mediations of Zabarella in northern Germany, 1586-1623 -- The diffusion of learned medicine in the sixteenth century through the printed book -- The reception of medieval practical medicine in the sixteenth century: the case of Arnau de Vilanova -- Melanchthon at the book fairs, 1560-1601: editors, markets and religious strife -- Cardano and his publishers, 1534-1663 -- André Wechel at Frankfurt, 1572-1581 -- Murder, debt and retribution in the Italico-Franco-Spanish book trade: the Beraud-Michel-Ruiz affair, 1586-1591 -- Competitors or collaborators?: Sebastian Gryphius and his colleagues in Lyon, 1528-1556 -- Alberico Gentili, his publishers, and the vagaries of the book trade between England and Germany, 1580-1614 -- English books on the continent, 1570-1630 -- 'Lusitani periti': Portuguese medical authors, national identity and bibliography in the late Renaissance -- Louis Jacob de Saint-Charles (1608-1670) and the development of specialist bibliography.] [* Subject heading: History of the book; book production; publishers and publishing *]

Mann, Peter H. From Author to Reader: A Social Study of Books. London and Boston: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1982. [* Subject heading: History of the book; literacy and education, medieval and early modern (reading and readers); authors and authorship *]

Manuscripta: A Journal Devoted to Manuscript Studies 1 (1957)-. [Issued three times per year.] [* Subject heading: manuscripts (journals) *]

McKenzie, D. F. "History of the Book." In The Book Encompassed: Studies in Twentieth-Century Bibliography. Ed. Peter Davison. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1992. Pp. 290-301. [Rpt. Winchester: St. Paul's Bibliographies; New Castle, DE: Oak Knoll Books, 1998.] [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

McKenzie, D. F. "Speech-Manuscript-Print." Library Chronicle of the University of Texas, Austin 20.1 (1990): 86-109. [* Subject heading: history of the book; orality and literacy; literary transmission *]

Myers, Robin, and Michael Harris, eds. A Millennium of the Book: Production, Design and Illustration in Manuscript and Print, 900-1900. Publishing Pathways. Winchester: St Paul's Bibliographies; New Castle, DE: Oak Knoll Press, 1994. ["[T]his volume . . . consists of papers presented at the 16th annual conference on book-trade history held at the Centre for Extra-Mural Studies, Birkbeck College, University of London" (Introduction, p. vii).] [* Subject heading: history of the book; manuscript production; manuscript decoration and illustration (illumination); early printed books: production; incunabula; book illustration *]

Perkin, Michael, ed. Illustration Processes and Binding in the Provinces: Aspects of the Provincial Book Trade in Southeast England. Reading: University of Reading, Department of Typography and Communication, 1993. [* Subject heading: history of the book; book illustration *]

Pittion, J.-P. Le livre à la Renaissance: Introduction à la bibliographie historique et matérielle. Nugæ humanisticæ sub signo Erasmi. Turnhout: Brepols, 2013. [* Subject Heading: History of the Book; early modern; historical and material bibliography *]

Ratcliffe, F. W. "The Contribution of Book-Trade Studies to Scholarship." In Six Centuries of the Provincial Book Trade in Britain. Ed. Peter Isaac. Winchester: St. Paul's Bibliographies, 1990. Pp. 1-11. ["The papers published in this volume were presented at the Eighth Seminar on the British Book Trade, Durham, July 1990, the silver jubilee of the History of the Book Trade in the North."] [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Rota, Anthony. Apart from the Text. Pinner, Middlesex: Private Libraries Association; New Castle, DE: Oak Knoll Books, 1998. [On the economics and technology of book production in the last two centuries, based on a study of changes in the appearance of printed books; the greatest changes in the printed book have occurred since 1955 and the invention of photo-typesetting.] [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Scriptorium: Revue Internationale des Etudes Relatives aux Manuscrits / International Review of Manuscript Studies 1 (1946)-. [* Subject heading: manuscripts (journals) *]

Stillwell, Margaret Bingham. Beginning of the World of Books, 1450-1470. New Castle, DE: Oak Knoll Books, 1972. [* Subject heading: early printed books; incunabula; history of printing (fifteenth-century) *]

Tanselle, G. Thomas. The History of Books as a Field of Study. Second Hanes Lecture, Hanes Foundation. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina, 1981. [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Tanselle, G. Thomas. Literature and Artifacts. Charlottesville: Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia, 1998. [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Vale, Malcolm. "Manuscripts and Books." In The New Cambridge Medieval History, Vol. 7: c.1415-c.1500. Ed. Christopher Allmand. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998. Pp. 278-286. [* Subject heading: history of the book; literary transmission; relation of manuscripts and books *]

Vervliet, Hendrick D. L., ed. The Book Through Five Thousand Years: A Survey. London: Phaidon, 1972. [* Subject heading: history of the book *]

Winckler, Paul A., ed. Reader in the History of Books and Printing. Readers in Librarianship and Information Science 26. Englewood, CO: Information Handling Services, 1978. [An anthology of previously published papers by various authors.] [* Subject heading: history of the book; history of printing *]



Bibliography: [ Some basic resources ] | [ General bibliography ] | [ History of the book ] | [ Literacy and education, medieval and early modern (readers and reading) ] | [ Archival research ] | [ Forgeries / bibliographic fraud ] | [ Dictionaries (historical) ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: Early Modern book culture ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: production ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: catalogues ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: facsimiles ] | [ Diplomatics: the study of historical documents ] | [ Printing, history of ] | [ Publishing, history of ] | [ Libraries and repositories, history of; book collecting ] | [ Manuscript culture ] | [ Manuscript culture: patronage ] | [ Manuscripts: codicology ] | [ Manuscripts: paleography ] | [ Manuscript production ] | [ Manuscript production: scribes and scribal practices ] | [ Manuscript production: decoration and illustration ] | [ Manuscript production: material culture (paper, bindings, etc.) ] | [ Manuscripts: catalogues and finding aids ] | [ Manuscripts: facsimiles and facsimile editions ] | [ Sigillography (the study of seals) ] | [ Textual criticism and editing ] | [ Keyword search of entire bibliography ]


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© 1998, 2017 Stephen R. Reimer
English; University of Alberta; Edmonton, Canada
All rights reserved.
Created: 29 Oct. 1998; Last revised: 13 Nov. 2017
URLs verified: 27 Nov. 2017

email: Stephen.Reimer@UAlberta.Ca
URL: https://sites.ualberta.ca/~sreimer/ms-course.htm