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Manuscript Studies
Medieval and Early Modern

Bibliography: Forgeries / bibliographic fraud


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Baughman, Roland Orvil. Some Victorian Forged Rarities. [San Marino, CA: Huntington Library, 1936]. [Rpt. from the Huntington Library Bulletin no. 9 (1936). On the copies of Wise forgeries in the Huntington Library.] [San Marino, CA, Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery.] [* Subject heading: bibliographic forgeries *]

Blades, William. The Fortsas Hoax. Ed. James Moran. London: Aborfield Products, 1961. [* Subject heading: bibliographic forgeries *]

Bordier, Henri, and Emile Mabille. Prince of Forgers. Trans. Joseph Rosenblum. New Castle, DE: Oak Knoll Books, 1998. [A translation, with a new introduction, of Une fabrique de faux autographes: Ou recit de l'affaire Vran Lucas (Paris, 1870). On Vrain-Denis Lucas, nineteenth-century forger of some 27,000 letters, mostly to and from famous historical figures: he became very wealthy, until 1870 when he was exposed and imprisoned for "the most colossal literary fraud ever perpetrated." "When he produced a host of letters written by Mary Magdelene to Lazarus, Cleopatra to Caesar, Pompey to Cato, all in French no less, and boldly sold them to one of France's leading collectors, Lucas's shameless audacity had reached new heights."] [* Subject heading: bibliographic forgeries; authorial copies (autographs, holographs) *]

Brooke, C. N. L. "Approaches to Medieval Forgery." Journal of the Society of Archivists 3 (1965-1969): 377-386. [* Subject heading: bibliographic forgeries; paleography (history of handwriting); scribes and scribal practices *]

Carter, John, and Graham Pollard. An Enquiry into the Nature of Certain Nineteenth-Century Pamphlets. London: Constable and Co.; New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1934. [The original exposé of the Thomas J. Wise forgeries, published while Wise was still alive (some reviewers wondered aloud about defamation of character). Thomas Wise, book collector and bibliographer, with easy access to British Museum copies of first editions of nineteenth-century poets like the Brownings, repeatedly "discovered" editions of these poets which were earlier than the known "first edition." These fraudulent "first editions" are now highly valued even though the fraud is well known, and a "Wise forgery" commands a very high price when it comes on the market.] [* Subject heading: bibliographic forgeries *]

Carter, John, and Graham Pollard. An Enquiry into the Nature of Certain Nineteenth-Century Pamphlets. 2nd ed. Ed. Nicolas Barker and John Collins. 2 vols. London and Berkeley: Scolar Press, 1983. [The first volume reprints the 1934 Enquiry; the second volume is A Sequel to An Enquiry into the Nature of Certain Nineteenth-Century Pamphlets by John Carter and Graham Pollard, by Nicolas Barker and John Collins (1983).] [* Subject heading: bibliographic forgeries; Thomas Wise *]

Chambers, E. K. The History and Motives of Literary Forgeries, Being the Chancellor's English Essay for 1891. 1891; rpt. Essays in Literature and Criticism 71; Burt Franklin Research and Source Works Series 508. New York: Burt Franklin, [1970]. [On literary forgeries generally.] [* Subject heading: bibliographic forgeries *]

Collins, John. The Two Forgers. London: Scolar Press, 1992. [* Subject heading: bibliographic forgeries; Thomas Wise *]

Davis, Tom. "Forged Handwriting." In Fakes and Frauds: Varieties of Deception in Print and Manuscript. Ed. Robin Myers and Michael Harris. Publishing Pathways 3. Winchester: St. Paul's Bibliographies; Detroit: Omnigraphics, 1989. Pp. 125-137. [Proceedings of the tenth annual conference on book trade history, at the Centre for Extra-Mural Studies, Birkbeck College, University of London, Nov. 1988.] [* Subject heading: bibliographic forgeries; paleography (history of handwriting); scribes and scribal practices *]

Freeman, Arthur, and Janet Ing Freeman. John Payne Collier: Scholarship and Forgery in the Nineteenth Century. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2004. [* Subject heading: history of the book; modern books; forgers and forgery *]

Haggerty Museum of Art. The Spanish Forger: Master of Deception. Milwaukee: Haggerty Museum of Art, 1987. [A catalogue of an exhibition of his work. The "Spanish Forger" (so called after the subject of one of his earliest detected works, though later evidence suggests that he was French, working in Paris in the late 19th cent. and early 20th cent.) produced some 150 "medieval" miniatures, some as framed single leaves, but at least 5 full-sized manuscripts (he took actual medieval manuscripts with incomplete series of miniatures and "finished" them).] [See also Voelkle, William.] [* Subject heading: bibliographic forgeries *]

Hector, L. C. Paleography and Forgery. St. Anthony's Hall Publications 15. London and New York: St. Anthony's Press, 1959. [* Subject heading: bibliographic forgeries; paleography (history of handwriting); scribes and scribal practices *]

Hiatt, Alfred. The Making of Medieval Forgeries: False Documents in Fifteenth-Century England. London: British Library; Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2003. [Hiatt focuses on forgery in fifteenth-century England and provides a survey of the practice from the Norman Conquest through to the early sixteenth century, considering the function and context in which the forgeries took place. Hiatt discusses the impact of the advent of humanism on the acceptance of forgeries and stresses the importance of documents to medieval culture, offering a discussion of the relation of the various versions of the chronicle of John Hardyng to the documents he forged, as well as documents pertaining to the charters of Crowland Abbey and various bulls and charters connected with the University of Cambridge. A considerable portion of the book concerns the Donation of Constantine, which involves many continental writers, German, French, and Italian. The Making of Medieval Forgeries further discusses the 'multiplicity of audiences' for forgeries: those that produce, those that approve, and those that are hostile.] [* Subject heading: bibliographic forgeries *]

Kahans, Jeffrey, ed. Shakespeare Imitations, Parodies and Forgeries. London and New York: Routledge, 2004. [* Subject heading: bibliographic forgeries *]

Klinefelter, Walter. The Fortsas Bibliohoax. New York: Carteret Book Club, 1941. [* Subject heading: bibliographic forgeries *]

Myers, Robin, and Michael Harris, eds. Fakes and Frauds: Varieties of Deceptions in Print and Manuscript. Winchester: St. Paul's Bibliographies; Detroit: Omnigraphics, 1989. [* Subject heading: bibliographic forgeries; history of the book; manuscript culture *]

Ramsay, Nigel. "Forgery and the Rise of the London Scriveners' Company." In Fakes and Frauds: Varieties of Deception in Print and Manuscript. Ed. Robin Myers and Michael Harris. Publishing Pathways 3. Winchester: St. Paul's Bibliographies; Detroit: Omnigraphics, 1989. Pp. 99-108. [Proceedings of the tenth annual conference on book trade history, at the Centre for Extra-Mural Studies, Birkbeck College, University of London, Nov. 1988.] [The growing reliance in the later Middle Ages on written documents as legal evidence led to an increase in falsification of documents. Ramsay studies false seals on twelfth-century forged documents.] [* Subject heading: bibliographic forgeries; sigillography; scribes and scribal practices *]

Rendell, Kenneth W. Forging History: The Detection of Fake Letters and Documents. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 1994. [* Subject heading: bibliographic forgeries *]

Rosenblum, Joseph. Practice to Deceive: The Amazing Stories of Literary Forgery's Most Notorious Practitioners. New Castle, DE: Oak Knoll Press, 2000. [* Subject heading: bibliographic forgeries *]

Ryan, Judith, and Alfred Thomas. Cultures of Forgery: Making Nations, Making Selves. CultureWork: A Book Series from the Center for Literacy and Cultural Studies at Harvard. New York: Routledge, 2003. [Publisher's description: "This collection of eleven essays by leading literary studies and cultural studies scholars examines the double meaning of the word 'forge'--to create or to form, on the one hand, and to make falsely, on the other. These notable scholars take on a broad range of topics, including falsified Hitler diaries, the creation of national identity in Bohemia, and Jean-Etienne Liotard's fraudulent 'Turkish' identity. Each essay asks how forgery--at once the work of a criminal and a 'master'--has shaped modern culture and challenged our understandings of authorship and value."] [Contents: Forging truth in Medieval England -- Forging a past: the Sibylline books and the making of Rome -- Forging Czechs: the reinvention of national identity in the Bohemian lands -- Eclectic fabrication: St. Petersburg and the problem of Imperial architectural style -- The blankness of Dali, or forging Catalonia -- The art of forging music and musicians: of lighthearted musicologists, ambitious performers, narrow-minded brothers, and creative aristocrats -- Jean-Etienne Liotard's envelopes of self -- Wrestling with representation: reforging images of the artist and art in the Russian avant-garde -- After the "death of the author": the fabrication of Helen Demidenko -- Facts, writing, and problems of memory in memoir: the Wilkomirski case -- The fascination of a fake: the Hitler diaries.] [* Subject heading: bibliographic forgeries; art history; Salvador Dali; Jean-Etienne Liotard *]

Voelkle, William; assisted by Roger S. Wieck. The Spanish Forger. New York: Pierpont Morgan Library, 1978. [A catalogue raisonné of his known works, with lots of reproductions, some of them in colour. The "Spanish Forger" (so called after the subject of one of his earliest detected works, though later evidence suggests that he was French, working in Paris in the late 19th cent. and early 20th cent.) produced some 150 "medieval" paintings (miniatures framed as single leaves, and panels), copied (with substantial enough alteration to render them almost unrecognizable) from reproductions published in a handful of (French) books of the 1870s and 1880s. There are also 5 full-size MSS, of 50-150 folios each, with decoration and miniatures (Graduals, Antiphonaries, etc.); he took actual medieval manuscripts with incomplete series of miniatures and "finished" them.] [See also Haggerty Museum of Art.] [* Subject heading: bibliographic forgeries *]



Bibliography: [ Some basic resources ] | [ General bibliography ] | [ History of the book ] | [ Literacy and education, medieval and early modern (readers and reading) ] | [ Archival research ] | [ Forgeries / bibliographic fraud ] | [ Dictionaries (historical) ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: Early Modern book culture ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: production ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: catalogues ] | [ Early printed books and incunabula: facsimiles ] | [ Diplomatics: the study of historical documents ] | [ Printing, history of ] | [ Publishing, history of ] | [ Libraries and repositories, history of; book collecting ] | [ Manuscript culture ] | [ Manuscript culture: patronage ] | [ Manuscripts: codicology ] | [ Manuscripts: paleography ] | [ Manuscript production ] | [ Manuscript production: scribes and scribal practices ] | [ Manuscript production: decoration and illustration ] | [ Manuscript production: material culture (paper, bindings, etc.) ] | [ Manuscripts: catalogues and finding aids ] | [ Manuscripts: facsimiles and facsimile editions ] | [ Sigillography (the study of seals) ] | [ Textual criticism and editing ] | [ Keyword search of entire bibliography ]


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© 1998, 2015 Stephen R. Reimer
English; University of Alberta; Edmonton, Canada
All rights reserved.
Created: 29 Oct. 1998; Last revised: 17 Sept. 2015

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