Publications

Orlando papers and presentations are prepared collaboratively by the Orlando team. Where no names are given, the whole team was involved.

Electronic Textbase
Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles from the Beginnings to the Present. Cambridge University Press, June 2006. (www.cambridge.org/orlandoonline) 8 million words; thirteen hundred writers; 40,180 freestanding and embedded events. Deeply tagged SGML textbase; newly developed delivery system.

Book

Katherine Binhammer and Jeanne Wood, eds., Women and Literary History: ‘For there she was.’ Introduction on “Feminist Literary Historiography” by Katherine Binhammer, Susan Brown, Patricia Clements, Isobel Grundy and Jeanne Wood. University of Delaware Press, 2003.

This volume originated with papers given at the Orlando Project’s early planning conference, “Women and Literary History”.

Contributors: Antonia Forster, Carole Gerson, Elaine Hobby, Kathryn R. King, Sally O’Driscoll, Suzanne Raitt, Betty A. Schellenberg, Bonnie Kime Scott, Ann B. Shteir, Susan Staves, Marjorie Stone, Jo-Ann Wallace.

Articles / Book Chapters

Susan Brown, Mariana Paredes, Jeffery Antoniuk, Breanna Mroczek, Isobel Grundy. “Mapping Orlando” in Place and Space: Cultural Mapping and the Digital Sphere. Edmonton: University of Alberta Press. Forthcoming, 2014.

Susan Brown, Patricia Clements, Isobel Grundy. “’The most unaccountable of machinery': The Orlando Project produces a textbase of one’s own”; in Interdisciplinary / Multidisciplinary Woolf: Selected Papers from the Twenty-Second Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, edited by Ann Martin and Kathryn Holland (Clemson, SC: Clemson University Digital Press, 2013). Print copies of the collection can be ordered from Clemson University Press. A pdf version of the collection, including the essay, can be downloaded by clicking here.

Susan Brown. “Don’t Mind the Gap: Evolving Digital Modes of Scholarly Production across the Digital-Humanities Divide” in Retooling the Humanities: The Culture of Research in Canadian Universities. Ed. Daniel Coleman and Smaro Kamboureli. University of Alberta Press. 203-231. Open access pre-print version: http://hdl.handle.net/10402/era.25382

Susan Brown, Jana Smith Elford, Michael Bauer, Jennifer Berberich, and Jonathan Cable. “’Elevating Influence’: Victorian Literary History by Graphs.” Victorian Institute Journal Digital Annex 38 (2010). http://www.nines.org/exhibits/Elevating_Influence

Susan Brown, Stan Ruecker, Jeffery Antoniuk, Sharon Farnel, Matt Gooding, Stéfan Sinclair, Matt Patey, and Sandra Gabriele. “Reading Orlando with the Mandala Browser: A Case Study in Algorithmic Criticism via Experimental Visualization.” in Digital Studies/Le Champ Numérique 2.1 (2010).

Susan Brown, Patricia Clements, Isobel Grundy, Stan Ruecker, Jeffery Antoniuk, and Sharon Balazs. “Published Yet Never Done: The Tension Between Projection and Completion in Digital Humanities Research” in Digital Humanities Quarterly 3:2 (Spring 2009). Available at: https://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/2/000040.html”>

Ruecker, Stan, Susan Brown, Milena Radzikowska, Stéfan Sinclair, Thomas M. Nelson, Patricia Clements, Isobel Grundy, Sharon Balasz, and Jeff Antoniuk. “The Table of Contexts: A Dynamic Browsing Tool for Digitally Encoded Texts”; in The Charm of a List: From the Sumerians to Computerised Data Processing. Ed. Lucie Dolezalova. Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2009. pp. 177-187.

Brown, Susan, Stan Ruecker, Milena Radzikowska, Matt Patey, Stéfan Sinclair, Jeffery Antoniuk, Sharon Farnel, and Isobel Grundy. “Visualizing Varieties of Association in Orlando”. Proceedings of the Chicago Colloquium on Digital Humanities and Computer Science 1:1 (2009).

Isobel Grundy, Susan Brown, and Patricia Clements. “Orlando. The Marriage of Literary History and Humanities Computing” in 1650-1850: Ideas, Aesthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era, ed. Kevin J. Cope, 14, 2007, 253-279.

Susan Brown, Stan Ruecker, Jeffery Antoniuk, Sharon Balazs, Isobel Grundy, Patricia Clements. “Designing Rich-Prospect Access to a Feminist Literary History.” WWR: The Official Magazine of Women Writing and Reading 2.1 (Fall 2007):12-17.

Patricia Clements. “Ink and Air: Computing and the Research Culture of the Humanities,” in Mind Technologies: Humanities Computing and the Canadian Academic Community, ed. Ray Siemens and David Moorman. University of Calgary Press, 2006. 15 – 31.

Susan Brown, Stan Ruecker, Jeffery Antoniuk, Sharon Balazs, Isobel Grundy, Patricia Clements. “Designing Rich-Prospect Access to a Feminist Literary History.” WWR: The Official Magazine of Women Writing and Reading 2.1 (Fall 2007):12-17.

Isobel Grundy, Susan Brown, Patricia Clements, Sharon Balazs, Jeffery Antoniuk. “Archives. An Introduction to the Orlando Project” and “Innovations: The Story of the Orlando Project: Personal Reflections.” Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature, special anniversary edition (2007): 127-34 and 135-43.

“Between Markup and Delivery; or Tomorrow’s Electronic Text Today,” in Mind Technologies: Humanities Computing and the Canadian Academic Community, ed. Ray Siemens and David Moorman. University of Calgary Press, 2006. xxxiii – xlii.

“Sorting things in: Feminist knowledge representation and changing modes of scholarly production.” Feminisms and Print Culture special issue. Ed. Maria diCenzo. Women’s Studies International Forum 29:3 (May 2006): 317 – 325.

“Facing the Deep: The Orlando Project Delivery System 1.0.” TEXT Technology 14:2 (2005): 21 – 40.

“Intertextual Encoding in the Writing of Women’s Literary History,” Computers and the Humanities 38 (2004): 191 – 206.

“Dates and ChronStructs:  Dynamic Chronology in the Orlando Project,” Literary and Linguistic Computing 15:3 (2000): 265 – 289. Full text available.

“Can a Team Tag Consistently?  Experiences on the Orlando Project,” Markup Languages Theory and Practice 2:2 (Spring 2000): 111 – 125.

“Tag Team: Computing, Collaborators, and the History of Women’s Writing in the British Isles,”  Technologising the Humanities / Humanitising the Technologies. Special issue of Computing in the Humanities Working Papers, Ed. R. G. Siemens and William Winder. TEXT Technology 8 (1998): 37 – 52. Available at: http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/epc/chwp/orlando/index.html

“SGML and the Orlando Project: Descriptive Markup for an Electronic History of Women’s Writing,” Computers and the Humanities 31 (1998): 271 – 85.

“The Orlando Project: Building Digital Resources for an Integrated History of Women’s Writing in the British Isles,” The Digital Demotic: Selected Papers from DRH97, Digital Resources for the Humanities Conference. Ed. Lou Burnard, Marilyn Deegan, and Harold Short. London: Office for Humanities Communication (1998): 25 – 38.

Report
Susan Brown, Andrew Bretz and Hannah McGregor. Lasting Change: Sustaining Digital Scholarship in Canada. Report of the Sustaining Digital Scholarship for Sustainable Culture project funded by the Knowledge Synthesis on the Digital Economy program of the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada. 2010. Available at http://www.cwrc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/Lasting-Change-Knowledge-Synthesis.pdf

Abstracts
Susan Brown, Milena Radzikowska, Stan Ruecker, Geoffrey Rockwell, Luciano Frizzera and members of the Implementing New Knowledge Environment research group. “Workflows as Structured Surfaces.” Digital Humanities Conference. University of Hamburg. July 16-11 2012. Abstract of refereed paper. Digital Humanities 2012 Conference Abstracts. Hamburg University. http://www.dh2012.uni-hamburg.de/conference/programme/abstracts/workflows-as-structured-surfaces/

“Structured Surfaces for JiTR” and “The Interface of the Collection”. Paper and Panel. Susan Brown, Milena Radzikowska, Stan Ruecker, Piotr Organisciak, and members of the INKE project. Digital Humanities 2011 Conference Abstracts. Stanford University. https://www.stanford.edu/group/dh2011/cgi-bin/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/DH2011_BookOfAbs.pdf

Susan Brown, Jeffery Antoniuk, Michael Bauer, Jennifer Berberich, Milena Radzikowska, Stan Ruecker and Terence Yung. “How Do You Visualize a Million Links?” Digital Humanities 2010 Conference Abstracts. King’s College London. 105-107. http://dh2010.cch.kcl.ac.uk/academic-programme/abstracts/papers/pdf/book-final.pdf

Susan Brown, Ray Siemens, Michael Eberle-Sinatra, Lynne Siemens, Stéfan Sinclair, Meagan Timney, and Geoffrey Rockwell. Panel presentation “Understanding the ‘Capacity’ of the Digital Humanities: The Canadian Experience, Generalised”. Digital Humanities 2010 Conference Abstracts. King’s College London. 82-83.

Susan Brown, Piotr Organisciak, Kamal Ranaweera, Geoffrey Rockwell, and Stan Ruecker. “Mashing Texts: Supporting Collections Level Text Analysis.” Digital Humanities 2009 Conference Abstracts. University of Maryland.

“Delivering the Depths: Representing the Orlando Project’s Interpretive Markup,” ALLC/ACH Conference Abstracts. Athens: University of Georgia, 2003, 33 – 35. “Extending the Collaboration,” ALLC/ACH Conference Abstracts. Athens: University of Georgia, 2003, 124 – 25.

“Orlando on the Web: From Development System to Web-based Delivery of a Content-Encoded Textbase,” ALLC/ACH Conference Abstracts. Athens: University of Georgia, 2003, 158 – 59.

“Can a Team Tag Consistently?  Experiences on the Orlando Project,”  ALLC/ACH 99 Conference Abstracts. Charlottesville: University of Virginia, 1999. Abstract of refereed paper. Available at http://www.ach.org/abstracts/1999/butler.html

“Developing a Dynamic and Complex Chronology within a History of Women’s Writing in the British Isles,” ALLC/ACH ’98 Conference Abstracts. Debrecen, Hungary: Lajos Kossuth University, 1998, 20 – 22. Abstract of refereed paper. “The Orlando Project: Humanities Computing in Conversation with Literary History,” ALLC/ACH ‘97 Conference Abstracts. Kingston: Queen’s University, 1997, 83 – 89. Abstract of refereed paper.

Lectures and Conference Papers

Susan Brown, Patricia Clements, and Isobel Grundy. “‘The most unaccountable of machinery’: The Orlando Project Produces a Textbase of One’s Own”, plenary at “Interdisciplinary / Multidisciplinary Woolf”, the 22nd annual International Virginia Woolf Conference at Saskatoon, SK. 9 June 2012.

Susan Brown, Isobel Grundy, Mariana Paredes-Olea, Jeffery Antoniuk, and Breanna Mroczek. “Geographical Analysis of Writer Trajectories and Subject Matter Trends in Orlando.” CWRC2 Canadian Women Writers: Space / Place / Play conference. Ryerson University, Toronto. 28 October 2011.

Susan Brown. “Mobilizing markup for critical digital humanities: cultural formation in Orlando.” Nebraska Digital Workshop. University of Nebraska-Lincoln. 15 October 2011.

Susan Brown. “Digging the Poetess: Exploring Social Networks in Orlando.” ACCUTE-SDH/SEMI Joint Session at Congress of the HSSFC. Concordia University. Montreal. 31 May 2010.

Susan Brown, Blair Nonnecke, Stan Ruecker, and Claire Warwick. “Studying Orlando’s Interfaces.” Paper presented at the Society for Digital Humanities/ Société pour l’étude des médias interactifs annual conference, 2009 Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities, Carleton University. May 25-27, 2009.

Orlando‘s Digital Literary History: New Ways to Study Authors, Readers, and Publishing” paper at annual conference of SHARP, the Society for the History of Authorship, Readers and Publishing, at Brookes University, Oxford, UK. 26 June 2008.

Orlando, Women’s Writing in the British Isles: online exploration of women’s lives and works”. Plenary at Aphra Behn Society annual conference. University of New Mexico. 26 October 2007.

“Indexing in an Information Environment.” Presented at NFAIS (National Federation of Abstracting and Information Services) Humanities Roundtable V. The Graduate Center of the City University of New York, 16 October 2006.

Isobel Grundy. Demonstration of Orlando. Presented at Not Drowning but Waving: Women, Feminism, and the Liberal Arts Conference. University of Alberta, 13 October 2006.

Isobel Grundy. “Encountering Women’s Literary History Online: Orlando, a Newly Published Resource”, at “Boundaries in the Eighteenth Century / Frontières au dix-huitième siècle”, annual meeting of ISECS, the International Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Svartå, Finland. 1 September 2006.

Susan Brown, Patricia Clements, Isobel Grundy. “Literary History – with a Difference”. Plenary at annual meeting of SDH/SEMI (Society for Digital Humanities / Société pour l’étude des médias interactifs), Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities, York University, Toronto. 31 May 2006.

Susan Brown, Patricia Clements, Isobel Grundy. “Humanities and Computing: Orlando” at interdisciplinary symposium, “The Computer: The Once and Future Medium for the Humanities and Social Sciences”, at annual meeting of SDH/SEMI, York University, Toronto. 30 May 2006.

Isobel Grundy. “Eighteenth-Century Women and the Digital Turn.” Presented for the annual Clifford Lecture at the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies conference, Montreal. 31 March 2006.

Susan Brown, Patricia Clements, Isobel Grundy. “Orlando Abroad: Scholarship and Transformation”. Presented at Digital Humanities 2006, Sorbonne, Paris

“Starting from Scratch: the Orlando Project and the Challenges of Literary History,” IC Forum, Computing in the Arts. University of Alberta, 24 January 2005.

The Orlando Project: the Delivery System.” Image, Text, Sound & Technology: A Symposium on Digital Text Editing. University of Saskatchewan, May 2004.

“Extending the Collaboration,” paper presented to the annual meeting of ACH/ALLC (Association for Computing in the Humanities/Association of Literary and Linguistic Computing), Athens, Georgia, 2 June 2003.

“The Augmented Intelligence,” paper presented to COCH/COSH, Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, Dalhousie University, Halifax, 27 May 2003.

“Creativity, Culture, and Computing,” keynote address, Brock University Humanities Symposium, 28 April 2003.

“Between  Markup and Delivery; or, Tomorrow’s Electronic Text Today.” At plenary session, “Inter/Disciplinary Models, Disciplinary Boundaries: Humanities Computing and Emerging Mind Technologies.” COCH/COSH 2002 Meeting, Toronto, 27 May 2002.

Orlando Session, “Diverse Encoding and Encoding Diversity: Conceptual Markup on The Orlando Project“. Three papers as follows: “The Hard and the Soft: Encoding Literary History,” “Risking E-Race-Sure/Erasure: Encoding Cultural Formations,” and “The Anxiety of Encoding: Intertextuality and Feminist Literary History.” Digital Research in the Humanities Conference, School of African and Oriental Studies, London University, 9 July 2001.

“Text and Intertext in Electronic Documents.” Annual ALLC/ACH Conference, New York, June 2001.

“Between the Lines: Encoding Our Orlando.” The Eleventh Virginia Woolf Conference. University of Wales at Bangor, 14 June 2001.

“Women’s Literary History by Electronic Means: the Creation and Communication of Meaning on the Orlando Project.” 7 June 2001. Annual Donald F. McKenzie Lecture, Oxford University.

“Finding New Pathways Through Literary History.” McKenzie Seminar, 8 June 2001, Oxford University.

“Solutions for the Delivery of Thematically Tagged Text.” Joint International Conference of the Association for Literary and Linguistic Computing and the Association for Computing in the Humanities. University of Glasgow, July 2000.

“Electronic Literary History and some Bibliographical Issues.” Meeting of the Bibliographical Society of Canada. University of Alberta, June 2000.

“Collaboration and Possibility in the Orlando Project.” Workshop with FACT Group (Feminism and Cultural Texts). University of Calgary, April 2000.

“The End of the Book? Going Electronic.” Victorian Studies Association of Western Canada 28th Annual Conference. University of Victoria, October 1999.

“Electronic Archives: The Orlando Project.” Turning the Centuries: The Ninth Annual Virginia Woolf Conference. University of Delaware, Newark, June 1999.

“Developing a Dynamic Chronology of Women’s Writing,” invited panel presentation at Turning the Centuries: The Ninth Annual Virginia Woolf Conference. University of Delaware, Newark, June 1999.

“Can a Team Tag Consistently? Experiences on the Orlando Project.” Joint International Conference of the Association for Literary and Linguistic Computing and the Association for Computing in the Humanities. Charlottesville, VA, June 1999. See the abstract or download our power point conference presentation.

“Smartening Up: The Orlando Project.” Special Session on “Making Electronic Texts Smarter.” 114th Convention of the Modern Language Association, San Francisco, December 1998.

“The Orlando Project: Issues when Moving from SGML to XML for Delivery of Content-Rich Encoded Text” Markup Technologies ’98, Chicago, November 1998.

“Developing a Dynamic and Complex Chronology within a History of Women’s Writing in the British Isles.” Joint International Conference of the Association for Literary and Linguistic Computing and the Association for Computing in the Humanities, Lajos Kossuth University, Debrecen, Hungary, July 1998.

“The Orlando Project and SGML.” Joint International Conference of the Association for Literary and Linguistic Computing and the Association for Computing in the Humanities, Lajos Kossuth University, Debrecen, Hungary, July 1998.

“Orlando Furioso.” Symposium on Reading and Teaching Early Modern Women Writers. Brock University, May 1998.

“The Orlando Project: Doing Women’s Literary History Electronically.” Seventh Annual 18th- and 19th-Century British Women Writers Conference, Chapel Hill, March 1998.

“The Orlando Project: Computing and the Collaborative Production of Literary History.” Special Forum titled “Revolution or Evolution?: Electronic Resources in the Humanities.” Modern Language Association, Toronto, December 1997.

“The Orlando Project: Building Digital Resources for an Integrated History of Women’s Writing in the British Isles.” Digital Resources for the Humanities, St Anne’s College, Oxford, September 1997.

“Describing Orlando.” Women and Literary History Conference, University of Alberta, September 1997.

“The Orlando Project: An Integrated History of Women’s Writing.” Keynote Address. Breaking the Myths Conference, Open University, London, September 1997.

“Tag Team: Computing, Collaborators, and the History of Women’s Writing in the British Isles.” Plenary at joint session sponsored by the Canadian Consortium for Computing in the Humanities as well as by the Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English, at the meeting of the Learned Societies of Canada, Memorial University of Newfoundland, June 1997.

“Orlando Project: Humanities Computing in Conversation with Literary History.” Joint International Conference of the Association for Literary and Linguistic Computing and the Association for Computing in the Humanities, Queen’s University, June 1997.

Patricia Clements. “Canadian Women’s Writing: Writing the Country,” as invited Canadian Studies Lecturer, Chiba University, Japan, February 1997.

Orlando Symposium, History Department, University of Alberta, 1996.

Orlando Panel, English Department, University of Alberta, 1996.

“A Textbase for a Literary Critical History: Defining the Elements.” Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English, Brock University, May 1996.

Poster Presentation. Joint International Conference of the Association for Literary and Linguistic Computing and the Association for Computing in the Humanities, 1995.

Other Papers Related to Orlando
Isobel Grundy, “‘Everything Interlinked': Putting Feminist Knowledge In Touch Across Centuries, Across The World.” Feminist Research Speakers Series, University of Alberta, 18 March 2009.

Stan Ruecker, “Conceptual Levels of SGML Tags:  a proposed taxonomy based on the tagging in the Orlando Project.”  Web Information Systems Engineering 2000 conference. Hong Kong, June 2000. (Article in pdf format. Get Adobe Acrobat Reader – free download)

Link to “Delivering Childbirth: Orlando Project Encoding.” This paper was given by Isobel Grundy, in a shorter version entitled “Childbirth Encoded: Women give birth and write about it,” at the British Eighteenth – and Nineteenth- Century Women Writers conference. Lawrence, Kansas, 16 March 2001.

Isobel Grundy, “Day Jobs for Women Writers.” Annual American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies conference. New Orleans, 19 April 2001.

Patricia Clements, “New Horizons for the Social Sciences,” discussant in session at a joint SSHRC/OECD Conference on Social Sciences for A Digital World: Building Infrastructure for the Future. Ottawa, 6 – 8 October 1999.

Patricia Clements, “Innovation and the Social Sciences and Humanities,” invited address to the AUCC meeting of Vice-Presidents Research on “Innovation: Same Realities, New Language?”. Montreal, 18 June 1999.

 

Reviews of Orlando

Matthew Reisz in Times Higher Education

[T]he possibilities offered by “interpretive tagging,”… enable the information about an individual writer’s life and work to be searched by time, place, genre and occupation. One can look at all the authors who were nuns or librarians; who wrote agit-prop, anthems or art criticism, who had links with Scarborough or South Africa. The biographers can also be interrogated in multiple further ways. Such options enable kinds of research quite impossible in a book. But they also indirectly help generate alternatives to more “mainstream” perspectives (50).

Matthew Reisz. “In search of a good companion: Matthew Reisz weighs up the role of weighty tomes of literary reference in the digital age,” Times Higher Education, 928:1 (December – January 2009), 48-51. Digital version available from Times Higher Education online.
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