Related Projects

The Orlando Project differs from most of these initiatives in that we are structuring and electronically encoding scholarly work which is in the process of being written, rather than texts that are already written.

The project most closely related to Orlando is CWRC, the Canadian Writing and Research Collaboratory / Le Collaboratoire scientifique des écrits du Canada. This infrastructure project builds on Orlando’s expertise in collaborative online scholarly production and its semantic tagging of interpretative material, to provide a digital working environment for the worldwide community of Canadian humanities scholars and researchers.

Cambridge University Press is producing a series entitled Cambridge Library Collection, which makes non-fictional texts from the past available in electronic or print-on-demand format. Some texts by women are gathered in a particular section; others, scattered throughout other sections, are provided with links to Orlando entries.

The Women Writers Project, now at Northeastern University, is an electronic textbase of women’s writing in English before 1830, currently available by subscription. The difference between this project and Orlando is that they are editing women’s texts, while we are writing a history. Orlando incorporates links to many of these texts from its passages of comment about them.

A Celebration of Women Writers provides a comprehensive listing of links to online information about women writers. It also develops online editions of works by women writers.

Chawton House Library is a research centre in early women’s writing at Chawton, UK, opened in 2003, with a library of rare books. Some are already freely available online; the fifty rarest texts in the collection are scheduled for electronic availability. Orlando incorporates links to these from its textbase.

The Emory Women Writers Resource Project is a collection of edited and unedited texts by women writing from the seventeenth century through the early twentieth century.

The Perdita Project produced a database guide to about 400 sixteenth- and seventeenth-century manuscript archives compiled by women in the British Isles.

The Victorian Women Writers Project offers TEI-encoded transcriptions of literary works by nineteenth-century women writers, mostly British and primarily the lesser-known.

The Oxford Text Archive, an archive of literary texts, is maintained by Oxford University Computing Services.

The Margot Group at the University of Waterloo is producing texts from the French Middle Ages and Early Modern writers (particularly women), and Latin texts much used by such writers.

The Contemporary Women’s Writing Network (CWWN) is an online forum that promotes research and exchange of ideas among those interested in contemporary women’s writing.

Middlebrow: An Interdisciplinary Transatlantic Research Network, an “AHRC-funded project that provides a focus for research on the loaded and disreputable term ‘middlebrow’ and the areas of cultural production it purports to represent. The network is both transatlantic and interdisciplinary.”

The Stainforth Library of Women Writers is creating a digital model of the Rev. Francis John Stainforth’s collection of books by women writers: the largest private library of such books in the nineteenth century.

Developed by scholars at the Universities of Barcelona, Cambridge, Glasgow, Leiden, Rouen and Uppsala, Producing Change: Gender and Work in Early Modern Europe is a Leverhulme International Network project that is hosting events and compiling a database along with principles for dataset design and data collection.

The Women’s Studies Group, 1558-1837 is an informal, London-based multidisciplinary initiative hosting seminars and other initiatives since its inception in the early 1980s.

Based at Texas A&M University and with a focus on the years 1500-1800, the Women in Book History project comprises “a hub where scholarship and resources on women’s writing and labor is made visible.” Its bibliography “ameliorates the absence of mainstream attention by providing a venue where the breadth and depth of scholarship on women’s lives and labor can be explored.”

Sponsored by the Leverhulme Trust and based at the University of Surrey, Diane Watt’s Women’s Literary Culture Before the Conquest “offers the first sustained exploration of the literary culture of women in early medieval England. It explores both the conditions that enabled a rich and varied culture to thrive, and the reasons why that remarkable culture is almost invisible today.”

All Things Georgian a blog by Joanne Major and Sarah Murden, includes plentiful material on women’s lives including details from their recent book about courtesan memoirist Grace Dalrymple Elliott.

Reviews of Orlando

Matthew Reisz in Times Higher Education

[T]he possibilities offered by “interpretive tagging,”… enable the information about an individual writer’s life and work to be searched by time, place, genre and occupation. One can look at all the authors who were nuns or librarians; who wrote agit-prop, anthems or art criticism, who had links with Scarborough or South Africa. The biographers can also be interrogated in multiple further ways. Such options enable kinds of research quite impossible in a book. But they also indirectly help generate alternatives to more “mainstream” perspectives (50).

Matthew Reisz. “In search of a good companion: Matthew Reisz weighs up the role of weighty tomes of literary reference in the digital age,” Times Higher Education, 928:1 (December – January 2009), 48-51. Digital version available from Times Higher Education online.
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