Related Projects

The Orlando Project differs from most of these initiatives in that we are structuring and electronically encoding scholarly work which is in the process of being written, rather than texts that are already written.

The project most closely related to Orlando is CWRC, the Canadian Writing and Research Collaboratory / Le Collaboratoire scientifique des écrits du Canada. This infrastructure project builds on Orlando’s expertise in collaborative online scholarly production and its semantic tagging of interpretative material, to provide a digital working environment for the worldwide community of Canadian humanities scholars and researchers.

Cambridge University Press is producing a series entitled Cambridge Library Collection, which makes non-fictional texts from the past available in electronic or print-on-demand format. Some texts by women are gathered in a particular section, others scattered throughout other sections. Here too Orlando provides links.

The Women Writers Project at Brown University, Providence, RI, is developing an electronic textbase of women’s writing in English before 1830, currently available by subscription. The difference between this project and Orlando is that they are editing women’s texts, while we are writing a history. Orlando will incorporate links to these texts from its passages of comment about them.

A Celebration of Women Writers provides a comprehensive listing of links to on-line information about women writers. It also develops on-line editions of works by women writers.

The Emory Women Writers Resource Project is pedagogical tool designed to allow graduate and undergraduate students to edit texts by women writing in English from the seventeenth to the nineteenth century.

The Perdita Project is producing a database guide to about 400 sixteenth- and seventeenth-century manuscript archives compiled by women in the British Isles.
The Victorian Women Writers Project is producing SGML-encoded transcriptions of literary works by nineteenth-century British women writers. Orlando hopes to incorporate links to these texts.

The Chawton House Library is a research centre in early women’s writing, opened in 2003, with a library of rare books. Some are already freely available online; the fifty rarest texts in the collection are scheduled for electronic availability. Orlando will incorporate links to these from its textbase.

Oxford Text Archive, an archive of literary texts, is maintained by Oxford University Computing Services.

The Margot Group is producing texts by Early Modern writers (particularly women), and Latin texts much used by such writers.

The Contemporary Women’s Writing Network (CWWN) is an online forum that promotes research and exchange of ideas among those interested in contemporary women’s writing.

Middlebrow: An Interdisciplinary Transatlantic Research Network, an “AHRC-funded project that provides a focus for research on th loaded and disreputable term ‘middlebrow’ and the areas of cultural production it purports to represent. The network is both transatlantic and interdisciplinary.”

    Reviews of Orlando

    Miranda Hickman in Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature

    Orlando features not only British women writers but rather a wide range of male and female writers in some way related to literature associated with the British Isles. As a modernist, I welcomed entries on American writers H. D., Djuna Barnes, and Marianne Moore (Hickman 181).

    It is inspiring to see such richly collaborative work in action in the humanities, enabled and encouraged by the Orlando framework; this reads as a real example of what Vera John Steiner calls the ‘co construction of knowledge.’ . . . I soon realized that the ground breaking (I should say pathfinding) nature of the project’s set up lay in how its structure allows one to navigate such pages [individual entries] in aggregate. . . . What Orlando allows you to do, in a spirit nicely faithful to the agility implied by Woolf’s Orlando, is to choose your own adventure. . . . When one departs from the usual technique of shuttling immediately to an individual writer’s entry, one appreciates more fully the mercurial quality of the information, uniquely susceptible of rearrangement thanks to the intricate electronic encoding system. This system of electronic tagging both indicates and enables theoretical savvy (Hickman 182).

    The rich corpus of information the Orlando team has managed to build in the project’s brief lifespan is nothing short of astonishing. In both theoretical and practical terms, this exciting project makes superb use of the implications of new technologies, and like Woolf’s Orlando, it points to the future. Like Woolf’s oak tree, may it flourish and ramify (Hickman 184).

    Miranda Hickman. Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature, 27:1 (Spring 2008), 180-86. (Available from Project MUSE).
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